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2022 FIFA World Cup and human rights
Pointing the finger at Qatar's rulers is not enough
As Qatar prepares to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, the country has come under fire for its treatment of migrant workers, with some nations calling for a boycott of the contest. But this simply misreads the realities of the situation and the underlying problems associated with international migration. By Sebastian SonsRead more
World Cup 2022 and Qatari reforms: So much hot air
Gulf State economies: The expat bonus
Oil and development in the Middle East: A two-edged sword
Sebastian Sons′ ″Auf Sand gebaut″: Saudi Arabia – a difficult ally
POLITICS
Turkey and northern Syria
Recep Tayyip Erdogan's deadly serious colonial project
The neo-Ottomanism propagated by Erdogan has long been more than rhetoric and symbolic politics. This can be seen from recent developments in parts of northern Syria, where Turkey is in the process of permanently securing its sphere of influence. Joseph Croitoru reportsMore
Erdogan and Turkish foreign policy: Neo-Ottoman rumblings
Turkey's Syria offensive: Burying the Kurdish autonomy project
U.S. withdrawal from Syria: The U.S. is still needed in Syria
One hundred years of Jordan
"A land for all Arabs" turned Middle East anchor of stability
Founded in 1921 as a temporary solution, Jordan managed to establish itself as one of the most stable countries in the Middle East. The inclusive and flexible approach taken by the state’s founder Abdullah and his successors doubtless contributed to this stability. But the centennial celebrations of the Hashemite Kingdom are overshadowed by an economic crisis and deadlock over political reform. By Edmund RatkaMore
The Levant: Jordan's fragile stability
Interview with Middle East expert Andre Bank: "Jordan consistently hedges its bets"
The crisis of the Arab nation state: Reconstructed reality
Historical roots of the current Middle East crisis: The end of an artificial construct
2022 FIFA World Cup and human rights
Pointing the finger at Qatar's rulers is not enough
As Qatar prepares to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, the country has come under fire for its treatment of migrant workers, with some nations calling for a boycott of the contest. But this simply misreads the realities of the situation and the underlying problems associated with international migration. By Sebastian SonsMore
World Cup 2022 and Qatari reforms: So much hot air
Gulf State economies: The expat bonus
Oil and development in the Middle East: A two-edged sword
Sebastian Sons′ ″Auf Sand gebaut″: Saudi Arabia – a difficult ally
100 years of Jordan
Prince Hamzah – just a storm in the royal Jordan tea-cup?
Faced with a deteriorating economy and a discontented populace, Jordan's ruling family is feeling the pressure. Was last weekend's palace intrigue involving Prince Hamzah indicative of a deeper crisis for Jordan, one that could inexorably alter the country's reputation for stability? By Cathrin SchaerMore
Amman and The Teachers' Syndicate: Free speech for everybody? Not so in Jordan, apparently
Politics, inequality and a lack of transparency: Coronavirus and the Middle East's ongoing state of emergency
Trump's plan for the Middle East: Those looking to annex can expect resistance from Jordan
MORE POLITICS »
SOCIETY
Execution for a Facebook post?
Why blasphemy is a capital offence in some Muslim countries
The Prophet Muhammad never executed anyone for apostasy, nor encouraged his followers to do so. Nor is criminalising sacrilege based on Islam’s main sacred text, the Koran. In this essay, Ahmet Kuru exposes the political motivations for criminalising blasphemy and apostasyMore
Human rights in the Islamic world: Battle cry "blasphemy"
Abusing blasphemy legislation: Indonesia's slide towards identity politics
Authoritarianism and underdevelopment in the Islamic world: Islamic clerics and statesmen in an unholy alliance
The decline of Islamic scientific thought: Don't blame it on al-Ghazali
COVID-19 rages on
Muslims begin Ramadan 2021 under the shadow of coronavirus
Surging coronavirus cases in many parts of the world have overshadowed the start of this year's Muslim holy month of Ramadan, with festivities once again curtailed by contagion fears.More
Iran orders 10-day shutdown amid fourth wave of coronavirus pandemic
Coronavirus in the Middle East: Rumours of vaccine tourism in Dubai unfounded – for now
Egypt plays politics with poverty: President Sisi’s COVID-19 divisive vaccine strategy
COVID-19 pandemic: Ramadan 2020 during coronavirus – with a virtual community
Burka bans in Europe
Why the burka is so important for right-wing populists
On 7 March, Switzerland became the latest European country to vote in favour of a so-called "burka" ban. It was yet another feather in the cap of the right-wing populist Swiss People's Party (SVP) on an issue that remains a perennial favourite with the Right across Europe. Essay by Daniel BaxMore
Swiss voters back proposal to ban full-face veils in public places
Regional 'burka ban' up for vote in Switzerland
France's burka ban: Excluding the wrong people
The rise of right-wing populism in Europe: A continent divided
Turkish graduates in Europe
Turkey's best and brightest flee in brain drain
As Recep Tayyip Erdogan continues his crackdown on dissent, increasing numbers of Turkish graduates and young professionals are seeking new lives and better prospects abroad. Germany is their No.1 destination. By Sinem Ozdemir and Daniel Derya BellutMore
Political turbulence in Turkey: President Erdogan under pressure
Freedom of the press: Turkey's Pelican group – Erdoganʹs state within a state?
Freedom of expression in Turkey: Academics on the run
MORE SOCIETY »
CULTURE
Turkey's handle on soft power
Hit TV series from Turkey conquer the Arab world
Televised Turkish dramas are all the rage in the Middle East. A young Ottoman TV Empire has been expanding its soft power by harnessing regional dialects, Arabic names and viewers' desire for racy-yet-traditional plots. By Jennifer HolleisMore
Islamic popular culture: A match for Bollywood – the rise of Turkey's dizis
Erdogan and Turkish foreign policy: Neo-Ottoman rumblings
Turkeyʹs Middle East exiles: Istanbul – the Arab worldʹs beacon on the Bosphorus
Qantara dossier: Turkish cinema
The Sufi Trail
Anatolia through the eyes of a pilgrim
The Sufi Trail is a long-distance hiking route from Istanbul to Konya that seeks to revive the ancient tracks used by foot pilgrims on their way to Mecca. Marian Brehmer spoke to the trail's founder and hiking route developer Sedat CakirMore
Interview with Islamic scholar and philosopher Abdolkarim Soroush: "The Sufis were prophets of pluralism"
Album review: Trygve Seim′s "Rumi Songs"
The filming of Rumi: Everybody's darling
Usama Al Shahmani's "Im Fallen lernt die Feder fliegen"
Falling, the feather learns to fly
In his second novel, "Im Fallen lernt die Feder fliegen", Iraqi author Usama Al Shahmani describes the stirring story of two young siblings seeking refuge, and their attempts to overcome the double trauma of war and exile. Volker Kaminski read the bookMore
Iraqi author Usama Al Shahmani: ʺIn foreign lands, the trees speak Arabicʺ
Shahad al-Rawiʹs "The Baghdad Clock": Romance and sanctions in ʹ90s Iraq
Nahidh al-Ramadhani's "The Hope Vendor": A successive shattering of dreams
Album review: Anansy Cisse's "Anoura"
A joyful tonic for the pandemic-weary
Anansy Cisse's new release "Anoura" – literally 'the light' – is not only a fine example of Malian music, but the story behind the album is also a microcosm of the struggles facing Malians, especially musicians, in the strife-ridden country. By Richard MarcusMore
Album review: Tartitʹs "Amankor/The Exile": Lapping at your consciousness
Album review: Imarhanʹs "Temet": Keeping it real
Abderrahmane Sissako's film "Timbuktu": In the beginning there was violence
MORE CULTURE »
‎‎‎Newest
Most Read
Execution for a Facebook post?
Why blasphemy is a capital offence in some Muslim countries
Turkey and northern Syria
Recep Tayyip Erdogan's deadly serious colonial project
One hundred years of Jordan
"A land for all Arabs" turned Middle East anchor of stability
COVID-19 rages on
Muslims begin Ramadan 2021 under the shadow of coronavirus
2022 FIFA World Cup and human rights
Pointing the finger at Qatar's rulers is not enough
Turkey's handle on soft power
Hit TV series from Turkey conquer the Arab world
In brief
Tunisian journalists protest over new head of state news agency
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Most Recent Photo Essay
Archaeologists discover "Lost Golden City of Luxor"
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A Ramadan etiquette guide for non-Muslims
There are 7 billion people in the world. And a full 22% of them – 1.6 billion – are fasting from sunup to sundown. Every day. For an entire month. It's Ramadan, the holiest month of the Muslim calendar. But what if you're not a Muslim – just a caring, considerate person. What should you do to ensure you don't come across as insensitive…More
Fasting during Ramadan: Too much of a good thing
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The Muslims who inspired Spinoza, Locke and Defoe
Written by 12th-century Arab writer Ibn Tufayl, “Hayy ibn Yaqzan”, which is about a boy alone on an island, appears to have influenced Daniel Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe". Mustafa Akyol argues that, since the way forward for Islam lies in reconciling faith and reason, it would be wise to reconsider what Ibn Tufayl’s “Hayy ibn Yaqzan” and the works of Ibn Rushd were trying to tell us.More
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