Marsa el Brega
Libya
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Alternative Title: Marsā al-Burayqah
Marsa el Brega, also spelled Marsā al-Burayqah, Mediterranean port on the Gulf of Sidra in northeastern Libya. The site, which was located by a small fishing village destroyed during World War II, contained nothing but land mines when it was chosen as the terminal for Libya’s first oil pipeline, running from Zelten, 105 miles (169 km) south. After 1960 a new port and town were built from prefabricated materials, including breakwaters and a wharf for supply ships, undersea pipes and floating berths for oil tankers, a power plant, housing, paved streets, and trees to hold back the sand. The first oil flowed there for shipment in 1961, and a refinery and a natural gas liquefaction plant were subsequently opened. An ammonia-processing plant was opened in 1977. Marsa el Brega is becoming the country’s major petrochemicals centre. There is a technical training school. The coastal highway connecting Tripoli with Benghazi and Cairo passes through the town. Pop. (2003 est.) 12,594.
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Geography & Travel
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Libya
WRITTEN BY
L. Carl Brown See All Contributors
Garrett Professor Emeritus of Foreign Affairs, Princeton University. Author of The Tunisia of Ahmad Bey.
Last Updated: May 13, 2021 See Article History
Alternative Titles: Al-Jumhūriyyah al-Lībiyyah, The Libyan Republic
Libya, country located in North Africa. Most of the country lies in the Sahara desert, and much of its population is concentrated along the coast and its immediate hinterland, where Tripoli (Ṭarābulus), the de facto capital, and Banghāzī (Benghazi), another major city, are located.
Libya
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Libya
flag of Libya
OFFICIAL NAME
Al-Jumhūriyyah al-Lībiyyah (The Libyan Republic)
FORM OF GOVERNMENT
interim government
HEAD OF STATE
Chairman of the Presidential Council: Mohamed al-Menfi
HEAD OF GOVERNMENT
Prime Minister: Abdul Hamid Dbeibah
CAPITAL
Tripoli
OFFICIAL LANGUAGE
Arabic
OFFICIAL RELIGION
Islam
MONETARY UNIT
Libyan dinar (LD)
CURRENCY EXCHANGE RATE
1 USD equals 4.468 Libyan dinar
POPULATION
(2020 est.) 4,954,000
POPULATION RANK
(2019) 120
POPULATION PROJECTION 2030
7,773,000
TOTAL AREA (SQ MI)
647,184
TOTAL AREA (SQ KM)
1,676,198
DENSITY: PERSONS PER SQ MI
(2020) 7.7
DENSITY: PERSONS PER SQ KM
(2020) 3
URBAN-RURAL POPULATION
Urban: (2018) 80.1%
Rural: (2018) 19.9%
LIFE EXPECTANCY AT BIRTH
Male: (2019) 74 years
Female: (2019) 78.8 years
LITERACY: PERCENTAGE OF POPULATION AGE 15 AND OVER LITERATE
Male: (2015) 96.6%
Female: (2015) 85.7%
GNI (U.S.$ ’000,000)
(2019) 51,755
GNI PER CAPITA (U.S.$)
(2019) 7,640
Libya comprises three historical regions—​Tripolitania in the northwest, Cyrenaica in the east, and Fezzan in the southwest. The Ottoman authorities recognized them as separate provinces. Under Italian rule, they were unified to form a single colony, which gave way to independent Libya. For much of Libya’s early history, both Tripolitania and Cyrenaica were more closely linked with neighbouring territories than with one other.
Libya
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Before the discovery of oil in the late 1950s, Libya was considered poor in natural resources and severely limited by its desert environment. The country was almost entirely dependent upon foreign aid and imports for the maintenance of its economy; the discovery of petroleum dramatically changed this situation. The government long exerted strong control over the economy and attempted to develop agriculture and industry with wealth derived from its huge oil revenues. It also established a welfare state, which provides medical care and education at minimal cost to the people. Although Libya’s long-ruling leader Muammar al-Qaddafi espoused an idiosyncratic political ideology rooted in socioeconomic egalitarianism and direct democracy, Libya in practice remained an authoritarian state, with power concentrated among members of Qaddafi’s inner circle of relatives and security chiefs. Opposition to the Qaddafi regime reached an unprecedented level in 2011, developing into an armed revolt that forced Qaddafi from power. (For a discussion of unrest in Libya in 2011, see Libya Revolt of 2011.)
Mukhtar Mustafa Buru
Gary L. Fowler
Dennis D. Cordell
The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
Land
Libya is bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the north, Egypt on the east, Sudan on the southeast, Niger and Chad on the south, and Tunisia and Algeria on the west.
Physical features of Libya
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Relief
Libya is underlain by basement rocks of Precambrian age (from about 4 billion to 540 million years ago) mantled with marine and wind-borne deposits. The major physical features are the Nafūsah Plateau and the Al-Jifārah (Gefara) Plain in the northwest, the Akhḍar Mountains (“Green Mountains”) in the northeast, and the Saharan plateau, which occupies much of the rest of the country.
The Al-Jifārah Plain covers about 10,000 square miles (26,000 square km) of Libya’s northwestern corner. It rises from sea level to about 1,000 feet (300 metres) at the foothills of the Nafūsah Plateau. Composed of sand dunes, salt marshes, and steppe, the plain is home to most of Libya’s population and to its largest city, Tripoli. The Nafūsah Plateau is a limestone massif that stretches for about 212 miles (340 km) from Al-Khums on the coast to the Tunisian border at Nālūt. West of Tarhūnah it rises steeply from the Al-Jifārah Plain, reaching elevations between 1,500 and 3,200 feet (450 and 975 metres).
In northeastern Libya, the Akhḍar Mountains stretch along the coast between Al-Marj and Derna. These limestone mountains rise steeply from the coast to about 2,000 feet (600 metres) and then stretch about 20 miles (30 km) inland, reaching nearly 3,000 feet (900 metres) at their highest points.
The Saharan plateau makes up about nine-tenths of Libya. About half of the plateau is sand desert, making it truly a sea of sand. Al-Harūj al-Aswad is a hilly basaltic plateau in central Libya. Covered with angular stone fragments and boulders, it rises to about 2,600 feet (800 metres) and is crowned by volcanic peaks. Al-Ḥamrāʾ Plateau lies south of the Nafūsah Plateau. It harbours bare rock outcroppings that rise to 2,700 feet (820 metres). In the Fezzan region in the southwest, a series of long depressions and basins contain wadis (dry riverbeds) and oasis settlements. Mobile sand dunes that reach heights of 300 feet (90 metres) are found in the Fezzan’s Marzūq desert and in the eastern Libyan Desert, which extends into Egypt. The country’s highest elevations are Bīkkū Bīttī peak (Picco Bette), which rises to 7,436 feet (2,267 metres) on the Libya-Chad border, and Mount Al-ʿUwaynāt, with an elevation of 6,345 feet (1,934 metres) on the Libya-Sudan-Egypt border.
Drainage
There are no permanent rivers in Libya. The numerous wadis that drain the uplands are filled by flash floods during the rains but then quickly dry up or are reduced to a trickle. The largest wadi systems are the Wadi Zamzam and Wadi Bayy al-Kabīr, both of which empty into the sea on the western coast of the Gulf of Sidra. Other large wadis drain the interior basins of Sirte, Zelten, and the Fezzan. There is also, however, extensive underground water. Numerous oases are watered by wells and springs, and artesian wells tap large deep fossil aquifers in the Fezzan and southeastern Libya; the Great Man-Made River was one of the more ambitious projects designed to make use of these underground reserves. (See the map illustrating the phases of the Great Man-Made River project that were planned or completed at the time of the 2011 revolt against the Qaddafi regime.) Along the coastal strip there are several salt flats, or sabkhas, formed by the ponding and evaporation of water behind coastal dunes. Principal salt flats are found at Tāwurghāʾ, at Zuwarah, and on the Benghazi Plain.
Libya's Great Man-Made River
Existing and projected pipelines of Libya's Great Man-Made River irrigation project.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Soils
The gray-brown soils of the Al-Jifārah Plain and the Nafūsah Plateau in the west are fertile, although over-irrigation has led to increased soil salination. In the east the soils of the Barce plain—which stretches between the Akhḍar Mountains and the sea—are light and fertile. Rich alluvial soils are found in the coastal deltas and valleys of large wadis. On the margins of the Sahara, cultivation and overgrazing have seriously depleted the soil. The rest of the country is covered by wind-eroded sand or stony desert. The soils in these areas are poorly developed, with little organic material.
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