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Democrats, keep your promise on the $15 minimum wage
Opinion by William J. Barber II and Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove
The Senate parliamentarian's decision last week against including the increase in the minimum wage to $15 in the Covid-19 relief bill has forced a basic question before Democratic leadership to center stage: With control of both the House and the Senate, will they use the power they have to keep their promise to raise wages for poor and low-income people?
The key question for jury selectors in the George Floyd trial
Opinion by Elie Honig
Elie Honig writes that it's always difficult to select jurors in high-profile cases like the killing of George Floyd. However, the selection process does include vital safeguards intended to ensure an impartial jury. "Every or nearly every potential juror will have heard of Floyd's death before the trial begins. But that alone does not disqualify a potential juror."
Biden's historic victory for America -- no thanks to GOP
Opinion by Julian Zelizer, CNN Political Analyst
President Joe Biden is on the cusp of a major legislative victory. If all goes according to plan and the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan is signed into law, Biden will have scored an early triumph in his presidency. The Covid-19 relief bill will provide a wide range of benefits, from direct payments to American families, money for vaccine development and distribution, small business relief, more substantial subsidies for the Affordable Care Act, a child tax credit, a higher Earned Income Tax Credit, federal funds for state and local governments and much more.
The disturbing tweets from GOPers who wouldn't accept Biden's win
By Frida Ghitis
What should happen if the public words and actions of members of Congress helped contribute to the attack on the US Capitol on January 6?
Here's what we need to do to prevent another pandemic from devastating the vulnerable
Opinion by Richard Besser
Six months after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and a swath of the Gulf Coast, the House of Representatives Select Bipartisan Committee issued a report to assess the preparation and response to that historic storm, which killed more than 1,800 people.
SE Cupp: We are possibly living in the stupidest of times
CNN's SE Cupp offers her take on Republicans' and right-wing media's fixation on culture wars while many Americans are still struggling during the Covid-19 pandemic.
As you celebrate pandemic hope on the horizon, remember those for whom it is too late
Opinion by Lisa Respers France, CNN
I promise that if you or someone you love has survived Covid-19 I rejoice for you.
The missing element in the George Floyd murder trial
Opinion by Mark Osler
As a former prosecutor and criminal law professor in Minneapolis, I am fielding a lot of calls about the upcoming trial of Derek Chauvin, who is accused of murdering George Floyd in this city. The media wants to know about the charges, the jury selection, the effects of televising the case and what the lawyers might do. No one has asked me about the very thing that makes this case important: The racially disproportionate treatment of Black Americans by the police. The trial will be a cyclone circling around the unmoving mass at its center -- race -- that silently drives the fury around it.
Joe Biden could be the most transformative president in 75 years
By Jeffrey D. Sachs
Americans believe by hefty majorities that we can solve our national problems and that the federal government should play a major role in areas including infrastructure, health care, environment, poverty reduction and economy. This broad support provides a foundation for Joe Biden to become the most transformative president since Franklin D. Roosevelt.
The most important exception the Senate can make
Opinion by Norman Eisen, Richard W. Painter and Jeffrey Mandell
There's a way to stop Republican senators from using the filibuster to block the passage of the landmark "For the People Act," write Norman Eisen, Richard W. Painter and Jeffrey Mandell. That way would be to make a special exception -- similar to that used for fiscal measures -- allowing a simple majority vote to approve laws on ethics and voting protections.
Texas governor's appalling decision on masks
Opinion by Katie Mehnert
I was getting my first dose of the Covid-19 vaccine at the Bayou City Event Center in Houston when the news broke that Governor Greg Abbott is lifting Texas' mask mandate -- even as health officials warn not to ease restrictions aimed at stemming the pandemic. No one at the vaccination site removed their mask, fortunately. But we immediately started discussing the decision -- and we were all appalled.
Why Democrats may look back on the $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill with regret
By Lanhee Chen
The US Senate is expected to pass a $1.9 trillion Covid-19 relief bill in the coming days before it heads to President Joe Biden's desk to be signed into law. This may seem like a major win for the new administration and congressional Democrats, but it's actually a Pyrrhic victory -- one that they may come to regret in the weeks and months ahead.
I love Texas but something's wrong
Opinion by Paul Begala
On March 2, 1836, Texas declared its independence from Mexico. Texas has the distinction of having been an independent nation before joining the United States. The history books say Texas joined the Union in 1845. Sometimes I wonder if Texas ever really, fully joined the Union -- especially on days like this, when while the US remains in the grips of a capricious, widespread lethal contagion, the governor ended Texas' mask mandate Tuesday and declared that all businesses in his state can be open -- 100% -- in a matter of days.
Ronny Jackson fit perfectly into Trumpworld
Opinion by Michael D'Antonio
As with so many chapters in the Trump saga, the tale of the former White House physician--described by subordinates as a 'tyrant' who had "tantrums," made "sexual and denigrating comments" and allegedly drank on the job, according to Pentagon watchdog's report--illustrates the strange way that the former president either attracts people who share his bullying and deceptive ways, or shapes them to fit the mold, writes Michael D'Antonio.
The Trumps are back, playing victims again
The veterans who need Congress to act in 2021
Opinion by Stephen F. Lynch, Mark Green, Richard Blumenthal and Tammy Baldwin
As members of Congress, we all share a deep respect for our men and women in uniform, as well as a collective responsibility to ensure that our veterans are appropriately cared for upon their return home.
The phony blame game on Texas weather
Opinion by Adam Sobel
Even as millions across the West, Midwest and South--and particularly Texas-- suffer with access to power, water and heat, the political debate over causes and blame remains hot and laden with old arguments, writes Adam Sobel. A few are substantive but many others are provoked by a bad-faith committment to climate denialism and beloved fossil fuels.
How the party of Lincoln became the party of Alex Jones
Opinion by Nicole Hemmer
At a news conference held in the hours after the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013, a man asked then-Gov. Deval Patrick whether the attacks had been carried out by the US government as part of a plot to clamp down on civil liberties. The governor, who had spent the day scrambling to respond to the crisis and begin coordinating the search for the perpetrators, dismissed the question with a quick "no."
Andrew Cuomo's offensive 'apology'
Opinion by SE Cupp
Facing accusations of sexual harassment, the New York governor made a weaselly, withholding statement acknowledging some of his behavior and then excusing it as misinterpreted, writes SE Cupp. This will do little to quell the fury of so many women, who are all too familiar with the gambit of: hey, you just can't take a joke.
Vernon Jordan -- Clinton's best friend and my personal mentor
Opinion by David Gergen, CNN Senior Political Analyst
David Gergen writes that Vernon Jordan, former President Bill Clinton's close friend, exemplified what a president's most important asset is -- a confidant whose discretion and independent judgment are guaranteed.
What's happening in Texas and Mississippi has to stop
Opinion by Peniel E. Joseph
The historic winter storm that crippled Texas during the third week of February spotlighted the Lone Star State's pervasive history of structural racism. Similarly, it revealed how seemingly universal crises, such as climate change and catastrophes sometimes referred to as "acts of God" affect some communities much more severely than others.
Biden is right about 'aliens'
Opinion by Ed Morales
With the Biden administration ending the use of the word "alien" when referring to undocumented immigrants in federal documents and communications, Ed Morales writes that the President is moving in the right direction.
George Washington's message for Donald Trump
Opinion by Richard Galant, CNN
On March 2, 1797, President George Washington wrote a letter comparing himself to a "wearied traveler who sees a resting place, and is bending his body to lean thereon." The idea of retiring after his controversy-filled second term was "most grateful to my soul," Washington confided to his former secretary of war, Henry Knox.
Lauren and Seth Rogen: We need to yell and scream for paid family and medical leave
This an emergency for American families that Congress could actually fix
Opinion by Debra L. Ness
Rocio Flores was only a few days into her new job at a daycare center last March when Covid-19 caused businesses and schools to shut down. Soon enough, the center where she worked reopened. But, as she told NPR in September, her kids' school did not. So, like so many working parents during the pandemic, Flores had to decide whether to earn a paycheck to support her family or quit her job so she could be with her 7- and 12-year-old at home. She decided she had to earn money, but every day, she said she went to work scared that something could happen to her kids while she couldn't be there with them.
Biden shows he is the voice of presidential sanity
Opinion by Jill Filipovic
Jill Filipovic writes that President Joe Biden's polite and thoughtful tone at CNN's town hall Tuesday was relatively boring television — and reflective of much better governance. Four weeks into his presidency, Biden is governing exactly as advertised: with competence, humanity and moderation. "That's good for the country — and it would be good for us to pay attention."
Cuomo administration's handling of nursing home deaths calls for serious investigation
Opinion by Jennifer Rodgers
Jennifer Rodgers writes that New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is in the hot seat amid allegations that his administration undercounted Covid-related nursing home deaths. "Luckily, there are a variety of ways in which potential government corruption like this -- whether ultimately it is determined to be an intentional, criminal act, a bureaucratic misstep, or something in between -- can be fully investigated."
Gun violence crisis in America's cities
Opinion by Greg Fischer, Eric Garcetti, Lori Lightfoot and Brandon Scott
You've probably seen the headlines: 2020 was a deadly year for gun violence in cities across America.
For Trump, accountability is still possible and necessary
Opinion by Michael D'Antonio
The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump may have ended with an acquittal on Saturday, but Trump's trials and tribulations are far from over. This fact should trouble the former president but comfort those who believe the powerful shouldn't evade accountability.
Biden is right to spend big for Covid-19 relief. But who's going to pay for it?
Opinion by Jeffrey Sachs
President Joe Biden has made a powerful case for his $1.9 trillion rescue package and has promised to follow it up with a longer-term recovery plan.
What Biden should do now about Trump
Jeff Flake: It's time for the Republican party to move on from Trump
Opinion by Jeff Flake
It was the morning of June 14, 2017. I stood near the first base dugout that just moments before had been our refuge from the gunfire of a madman. First responders had by now swarmed the field, tending to the wounded and marking off a crime scene.
Biden is hitting the reset button with Israel
Opinion by Aaron David Miller
Almost a month into his presidency, Joe Biden has yet to call Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. At a briefing last week, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said the call will take place "soon."
The accountability era begins
Opinion by Christine Todd Whitman, Norman Eisen and Joanna Lydgate
Immediately following his impeachment acquittal, former President Donald Trump issued a statement saying his movement "has only just begun." He is right about one thing: Something has only just begun, but it's not another chapter of the conspiracies and lies to which Trump clings. The movement that just got kicked into high gear is an era of accountability.
What 6 historians want you to know about Abraham Lincoln
For more than a century, the details of Abraham Lincoln's life and presidency have been told, re-told and told again, creating a near mythological figure in American history.
SE Cupp: Rush Limbaugh represented the elite he railed against
CNN Political Commentator SE Cupp reflects on the legacy of conservative radio icon Rush Limbaugh following his death at the age of 70.
Gavin Newsom's French Laundry scandal is no reason to toss him out
Opinion by Lincoln Mitchell
The effort to recall California Gov. Gavin Newsom is gaining momentum and is almost certain to gather more than enough signatures to make it to the June ballot. Californians will then be faced with the question of whether or not to recall the man they elected with 61.9% of the vote in 2018 and who is up for reelection next year. The recall is strongly backed by the Republican Party, because while a Republican would have a very difficult time winning a normally scheduled election for governor of California, a recall might pose a rare opportunity.
The man who created President Donald Trump
Opinion by Nicole Hemmer
When the news broke last October that Donald Trump had been diagnosed with Covid-19, legendary conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh immediately swooped in to help the campaign. He offered to hold a "radio rally" for the benched President, and Trump took him up on it. Though the resulting two-hour diatribe was not particularly effective radio, it highlighted just how important the radio host was to Trump's political career, even at that moment when both Limbaugh's show and Trump's presidency were nearing their end.
The US government must end its war on the American economy
Opinion by Dan Pearson for CNN Business Perspectives
As US Trade Representative-designate, Katherine Tai finds herself in an ironic situation: The most important country she will have to push to open its markets — a core component of USTR's mission — is the United States.
GOP chaos--and toxic Trump--are a big boon to Democrats
Opinion by Arick Wierson and Bradley Honan
The party's failure to toss Trumpism overboard will bring about more painful bloodletting for Republicans at the federal and state level in the years to come, as Republicans flee the party, write Arick Wierson and Bradley Honan. It's Trump who will help keep Democrats united.
This was no triumph for Trump
By David Axelrod, CNN Senior Political Commentator
He avoided sanction, but his impeachment trial imposed a more enduring penalty on the defeated president by laying bare for the world and history his craven role in orchestrating the seditious, lethal mayhem at the Capitol, writes David Axelrod.
Senators applauded Eugene Goodman's courage yet failed to show any themselves
Opinion by Laura Coates
On Friday, senators recognized Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman's courage and gave him a standing ovation for risking his own life to save theirs on January 6.
Leon Panetta: The risks of ignoring domestic terrorists are huge
Opinion by Leon E. Panetta
The former CIA Director writes that, like the foreign terrorist attack of 9/11, the Jan. 6 attack on the US Capitol was a wake-up call for America on the determination, resilience and will to harm of terrorists--this time homegrown. Capitol Police and other authorities were unprepared; this can't be allowed to happen again.
What if Trump hadn't had Twitter
Opinion by Julian Zelizer, CNN Political Analyst
Trump engaged in a month-long war against our democratic process, and his Twitter feed was an essential tool in doing so, writes Julian Zelizer. How do we know? Public discourse has already changed--and cooled--dramatically in the weeks since he was barred from various social media platforms.
America saw and heard January 6 all over again this week
Opinion by Ruth Ben-Ghiat
For many Americans this week, myself included, the traumatizing videos the House managers presented during the impeachment trial elicited a visceral response. Rarely has the American public experienced such a compelling example of the power of images and sound to communicate in ways that written texts cannot. That wrenching emotional punch needed to land with us. It's a reminder that unless we hold leaders like former President Donald Trump accountable for their dangerous and manipulative uses of misinformation, they will be free -- or worse, emboldened -- to repeat such actions in the future.
Trump's lawyers strike back at Democrats
CNN Opinion asks commentators to weigh in on the fourth day of former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial.
If Trump is acquitted, then we may as well strike the impeachment provision from the Constitution
Trump may end up lucky
Opinion by Elliot Williams
Lucky because if he gets acquitted again and avoids disqualification from future office in his second impeachment trial -- which is entirely possible, if not likely -- he will manage to avoid any sanction from the Senate despite having received lousy representation from his lawyers throughout the process.
Trump lawyers have a lot of explaining to do
Opinion by Paul Callan
Given the strength of the case against the former president, the Republicans in the Senate should be overwhelmingly voting for conviction, writes Paul Callan. If they don't, history will remember them as a collection of cowards who put the interests of a political party over that of the nation they were elected to represent.
Presidents Day is a time to reflect on the incredible power we entrust to imperfect hands
Opinion by Lindsay M. Chervinsky
Every year on Presidents Day, the country celebrates our past leaders. In recent years, however, many Americans have begun to question whether we have crossed the line between remembering and worshipping. If the past four years have taught us anything, we've learned that presidents are far from perfect, but they are central to American life. Presidents Day is an opportunity to reflect on the oversized impact of commanders-in-chief on our culture, safety and welfare, and democratic institutions -- as well as a moment to think about what we might expect of future leaders.
How we know Trump is guilty
Opinion by Frida Ghitis
One reason to put an impeached president on trial after he has left office is to deliver a clear, decisive verdict that the defendant's actions were abhorrent and should never happen again.
What will it take to change Senators' minds
America's military needs to confront the enemy within
Opinion by Amy McGrath and Paul Rieckhoff
This is our house to clean up, write Amy McGrath and Paul Rieckhoff. The military and post-9/11 veteran community need to tackle the issue of right-wing white supremacy in their ranks head-on after Jan. 6, to clearly identify the scope of the problem and understand how deeply it has invaded our military and veteran community.
What my dad and Kamala Harris's mom shared
Opinion by Anita Raghavan
Sixty years ago, two young people, living disparate lives in different parts of India, embarked on an odyssey that would change their future and over time help shape the complexion of a new country: America.
The most stinging line from day three of Trump's trial
CNN Opinion asks commentators to weigh in on the third day of former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial.
January 6 was the crime of the century
Opinion by SE Cupp
The phrase "crime of the century" has been used to describe the most enduring, sensationalist scandals that rocked our nation -- the kidnapping of the Charles Lindbergh baby, the Son of Sam murders, the OJ Simpson case and the JonBenet Ramsey murder.
Why Trump's defense team failed miserably
The most devastating piece of evidence at the Trump trial
Opinion by Elie Honig
At the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, there is no real dispute about what actually happened. Trump's effort to undermine the legitimacy of the November election, his inflammatory words to the crowd on the Ellipse in Washington, DC, on January 6, and the violent attack on the Capitol by many of his most ardent supporters -- they're all memorialized, on video, for the world to see.
Marjorie Taylor Greene's 'apology' and the challenge of Jesus
Two men cried in the Senate Tuesday. One of them made a devastating case against Trump
Opinion by Jill Filipovic
Jill Filipovic writes that the first day of the Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump was a perfect microcosm of the country's partisan divide and what's at stake in a post-Trump America. "Only one side made a legally coherent and morally upright case on Tuesday. And the fact that they are unlikely to win suggests that the lessons of the Capitol riot haven't been learned by most of the GOP."
3 former GOP senators: Trump should not escape accountability on a technicality
Harriet Tubman on $20 bill symbolizes a new era
Opinion by Peniel E. Joseph
It's clear after his first week in office that President Joe Biden's leadership marks a new era, one in which the White House intends to be the disruptor of what's always been, to forge national consensus around confronting systemic racism, making that -- as he put it Tuesday -- one of "the core values of this nation." Biden's laser focus on racial justice represents the most sustained presidential focus on race matters that America has ever seen, at least since Reconstruction or Lyndon Johnson's Great Society.
Arizona Republicans still backing Trump are on the wrong path
If Republicans don't denounce Marjorie Taylor Greene's extremism, they'll own it
By Elliot Williams
A CNN KFile review of the Congresswoman's posts indicated support for executing prominent Democrats in 2018 and 2019. That's stunning, says Elliot Williams, and the only response should be her resignation. But a vocal element of the party, with Greene as its drum major, has neutered the party's leadership, and rendered them incapable of condemning even obvious threats to others' safety.
Biden's honeymoon with the press will be fleeting
Opinion by Harold Holzer
As President Joe Biden completed his first week in office with praise from much of the media, some might wonder how long his press honeymoon can last.
Republicans react to 2020 defeats by trying to make it harder to vote
Opinion by Joshua A. Douglas
Republicans are using their lies about massive voter fraud in the 2020 election -- which had zero evidentiary support -- to propose even stricter voting laws for future elections. They must be stopped.
Biden's most important stimulus measure
Opinion by Jeffrey Sachs
The US federal government should spend more money, and fast, to fight the Covid-19 pandemic, rescue hard-hit families and help states, cities and small businesses. But it should also strive for a relief package built on some degree of bipartisan consensus.
What Biden's top economic priority must be
Post-Trump, the need for fact checking isn't going away
Former White supremacist: This is how to tackle hate and bigotry
Opinion by Chris Buckley
This week, we ask the question: What comes next for America and hate? The federal government lists White supremacy as a top threat to national security, thanks in part to a rise in White nationalism over the past four years. With a new president elected, how does Joe Biden confront the scourge of racism, anti-Semitism, misogyny and xenophobia that President Donald Trump helped stoke? SE Cupp talks to a panel of experts for our CNN Digital video discussion, but first, former White supremacist Chris Buckley writes our CNN Opinion op-ed.
Where Joe Biden's moon rock came from
Opinion by Robin George Andrews
The day after the inauguration of President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris, the Washington Post reported on the aesthetics of the newly redecorated Oval Office. Among all sorts of noteworthy items, a moon rock was found to be sitting on a bookshelf. Social media rejoiced at the sight, an indubitably cool artifact to find inside the White House. But what many didn't know was that this rock, dubbed Lunar Sample 76015,143, had been on an Odyssean journey to get there, one 3.9 billion years in the making.
"You have one job, Joe"
Republican extremists could doom party to endless defeats
Opinion by Douglas Heye
Republican Sen. Rob Portman's retirement announcement caught Washington DC by surprise. Portman, who won reelection in Ohio in 2016 by 21 points, was seemingly not on anyone's radar for potential retirement.
I witnessed the rise of Nazism firsthand. We must act now to protect American democracy
Opinion by Irene Butter
I am a survivor of the Holocaust and a proud American. I first landed on the shores of this country in Baltimore Harbor on December 25, 1945, under a brittle blue, clear sky. My lifeboat was lowered from a Liberty ship into the watery space between ice floes and I stepped onto the land that welcomed me.
Dr. Deborah Birx's shocking interview is way too late
By Jill Filipovic
In an interview, Trump's coronavirus response coordinator dropped some bombshells on his administration's gross negligence, writes Jill Filipovic. But while Birx isn't wholly or even mostly responsible Trump's mishandled Covid response, viewers were still left wondering: Why are we just learning about this now?
Biden should look beyond leverage to rejoin the Iran deal
Opinion by Ellie Geranmayeh and Esfandyar Batmanghelidj
President Joe Biden took office at a moment of global crisis, and tensions with Iran are among his most pressing foreign-policy challenges. After four years of nonstop hostility between Washington and Tehran, the first weeks of his presidency could determine the level of danger moving forward.
What Biden and Congress can do to support unions
Opinion by Richard Trumka for CNN Business Perspectives
At the ballot box, working people pushed America in a new direction. Two years ago, even two months ago, the idea of a pro-worker control of the US House of Representatives, Senate and White House was far-fetched. Following the victories of President Joe Biden in November and Senators Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock three weeks ago in Georgia, that is now America's governing reality.
Trump's big lie wouldn't have worked without his thousands of little lies
By Ruth Ben-Ghiat
Could Trump derail his impeachment trial?
Opinion by Elie Honig
Elie Honig argues that the Constitution allows for the impeachment of a former president, but the merits of the argument about whether a former president can be impeached and tried are only the starting point. "Things get really messy when we consider how a legal challenge might play out."
Why the Trump impeachment trial is crucial
By Frida Ghitis
How does a country recover from four years of virulent acrimony? The urgent need to heal America's divisions, to "end this uncivil war," stood at the center of President Joe Biden's stirring inaugural speech. He implored Americans to "open our souls instead of hardening our hearts."
Why the Trump martyr defense doesn't work
Opinion by Michael D'Antonio
This town powered America for decades. What do we owe them?
Opinion by John D. Sutter
This Wyoming coal town is a place of contradictions. At dawn, the land looks heavenly: Winds rattle the sagebrush; cotton-candy skies make a dusting of snow glow in pastel hues. Later in the afternoon, though, you look to the horizon and see the Earth hemorrhaging gray dust as trucks haul coal from pits the size of suburbs.
What Latinos want to hear from Biden
Opinion by Ed Morales
Ed Morales writes that while the inauguration of Joe Biden was a welcome relief after four years of Donald Trump's constant demonization of Latinos, it's going to take more than symbolic gestures of inclusion to address the needs of this often fragmented ethno-racial group which too often feels overlooked. "The question for Latinos, whose role in electing the new President has been endlessly debated, is how much they really figure into the Biden agenda."
Trump is not a fascist. But that didn't make him any less dangerous to our democracy
Opinion by Thomas Weber
Over the last five years, I have often wondered how political analysts who have compared Donald Trump's presidency to the rise of Nazi Germany would feel if a time machine sent them to Berlin in 1933. They would be stunned by the differences between then and now.
Four presidents take a stand
The ghost haunting the 2020 election
Opinion by Richard Galant, CNN
What is haunting the campaign of 2020?
Republicans' claims about Amy Coney Barrett insult our intelligence
Opinion by Jill Filipovic
Barring the sudden emergence of a collective conscience, Senate Republicans will confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court on Monday. They have told the public - and reiterated with a 12-0 vote of her nomination out of the Senate Judiciary Committee - that this is a perfectly legitimate path forward, and that Barrett is a highly qualified judge who will follow the law. What they have not mentioned is her extreme ideology.
How Trump could undermine Fauci and remake the US government
Opinion by Laurie Garrett
While many Americans were looking ahead to the final presidential debate earlier this week, President Donald Trump was signing an executive order the likes of which has never been seen in a democracy. It is an edict expected under a dictatorship, a banana republic or a military regime. And it appears to stifle the President's opponents within the government, posing a particular danger should it affect policymakers who are working tirelessly to fight the Covid-19 epidemic.
Why evangelicals should care about Trump's lies (and other sins)
Opinion by John Avlon
In a season of campaign schwag, a baseball cap caught my eye. Beneath an American flag were the words "Make Lying Wrong Again."
The 8-year-old who fears adults can't be trusted to fix the climate crisis
Opinion by John D. Sutter
Noah is an 8-year-old in Flamborough, Ontario. He loves nature shows and his two cats, Shadow and Whispers (he probably meant to name the second cat "Whiskers," according to his mom, but he mixes those words up sometimes). When he grows up, he wants to be a veterinarian or a nature photographer -- something that puts him in touch with animals and the Earth.
Covid-19 has exposed the US need to invest in public health
Opinion by Susan Blumenthal and Rebekah Gee
Covid-19 has crippled the US economy, compromised the health of our nation and exposed the shameful health disparities that negatively affect people of color and those living in poverty. In light of the devastation this pandemic has wreaked on our country, it is urgent for the US to invest in public health to better detect and prevent the spread of infectious and chronic diseases, redesign America's health care system for equity as well as effectiveness, and collaborate across multiple sectors of society to meet the basic needs of all Americans.
The Chicago 7 trial feels very real in 2020
Opinion by Daniel L. Greenberg
Refugees like my ancestors are part of what made America great
Opinion by Maya Rackoff
I am the great-granddaughter of refugees who fled Russian pogroms in 1895. Had they not been given safe haven here in the United States, they would have been tortured and killed. My very existence depends on international humanitarianism, an awareness that has inspired me to work closely with others like them.
Debate Coach: Biden barely passed, but Trump failed
Opinion by Todd Graham
With a mute button at the ready -- and a no-nonsense moderator in NBC's Kristen Welker guiding the proceedings in Nashville -- America got a better presidential debate Thursday night.
Trump is battling a new disease: empathy envy
Opinion by Bill McGowan and Juliana Silva
Perhaps more than any other political issue in this presidential campaign, President Donald Trump's empathy (or lack thereof) is on the ballot. It's at the heart of why former Vice President Joe Biden frequently reminds voters that "this election is a battle for the soul of America."
Who won the debate
CNN Opinion asked contributors for their takes on how Donald Trump and Joe Biden did in the final presidential debate. The views expressed in this commentary are their own.
John Roberts put the country before politics
Opinion by Richard H. Pildes
In the most important pre-election case this year, Chief Justice John Roberts once again appears to have decided that, for the Supreme Court, discretion is the better part of valor.
The new Texas 'Spindletop' might be ready to blow
The confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett is a threat to families like mine
Opinion by Jeneva Stone
My son Rob is 23 years old. He follows politics, enjoys sips of whiskey, and loves baseball. He also has a rare form of dystonia, a feeding tube, and a tracheostomy, among other pre-existing medical conditions. He uses a speech-generating computerized device to communicate with us. If the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were struck down by the Supreme Court after the addition of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, a mother of a disabled child herself, Rob would be uninsurable, like so many of his disabled peers.
The scary part of the SCOTUS ruling on Pennsylvania's mail-in ballots
Opinion by Joshua A. Douglas
The Supreme Court rejection of a Republican ploy to have the Court intervene in a case from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is far from a major Democratic win -- and could spell bad news for the future of voting rights protections across the country, writes Joshua A. Douglas
What if there's no winner on November 4?
Opinion Richard L. Hasen
What will the United States and the world wake up to on November 4, 2020, the day after Election Day? And could the US endure a close election in which Joe Biden is declared the winner but President Donald J. Trump refuses to concede?
What working-class Americans really want
Let's not pretend David Perdue wasn't being racist about Kamala Harris
Mandy Patinkin: How I became political -- and why you should too
If Trump loses, he'll take this deal
Opinion by Joe Lockhart
It's not 'court packing.' It's how we save democracy
Opinion by W. Kamau Bell
What's behind Trump's 'I know nothing' defense
By Michael D'Antonio
In awful year for Asian Americans, I rejoiced in this
Opinion by Michelle Yang
Early in the lockdown, my 6-year-old was on his scooter zipping away in front of me on our quiet Seattle neighborhood street when I sensed a car coming from behind. I called out for my child to stop, but under his bright helmet painted with a cartoon lion, he couldn't hear me.
This pressing issue must come up at the last debate
Opinion by William J. Barber II and Liz Theoharis
On Thursday evening, Americans have one last chance to hear President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden on the same stage for 90 minutes. While neither candidate is likely to change course or depart from their stump speech, Americans deserve to hear both candidates address the pressing issue of poverty.
How to read Pope Francis' message of love
Opinion by Allison Hope
The highest Catholic in all the world has pushed the door towards LGBTQ inclusion open further by pronouncing that same-sex couples, historically excluded from traditional religious and civil institutions like marriage, ought to have legal protections that recognize their unions.
Why China doesn't care who wins the White House
Opinion by Jiang Xueqin
In 2016, when nearly everyone in China thought that Hillary Clinton would win the White House, one group in particular was confident of a Donald Trump victory. Back when most goods flowed from China, merchants in the trading hub of Yiwu received four times more orders for Trump than for Clinton merchandise.
Trump should be 'unmuted' at debate
Opinion by Paul Begala
The Commission on Presidential Debates is giving an enormous advantage to Donald Trump with its plan to mute the microphones of the candidates at Thursday night's presidential debate when they're not supposed to be speaking. That was likely not the commission's intent, and I realize President Trump and his spokespeople are fuming about it, but the mute button is a gift to the Trump campaign.
Texas 'Spindletop' ready to blow?
Opinion by James Moore
The facts about Texas tend to be more astonishing than the mythology.
Judge Barrett is a threat to families like mine
Opinion by Jeneva Stone
My son Rob is 23 years old. He follows politics, enjoys sips of whiskey, and loves baseball. He also has a rare form of dystonia, a feeding tube, and a tracheostomy, among other pre-existing medical conditions. He uses a speech-generating computerized device to communicate with us. If the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were struck down by the Supreme Court after the addition of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, a mother of a disabled child herself, Rob would be uninsurable, like so many of his disabled peers.
My brother didn't get Covid-19, but he was a victim
Opinion by Alyssa Klein
As a sibling to someone who overdosed at the start of the Covid-19 crisis, I'm reminded every day that our national conversation ignores the uncounted victims of the pandemic. Victims like my brother, David, who passed away on March 24 in Orange County, California. While his death certificate states "acute polydrug intoxication due to the combined effects of heroin [and other drugs]" as his cause of death, my brother is another tragedy of this moment.
Judge Barrett's view of the ACA stirs fear among disabled Americans
Opinion by Rebecca Cokley
As I watched the Supreme Court confirmation hearings of Judge Amy Coney Barrett last week, I couldn't help but think how much her confirmation would hurt families like hers and mine.
My brother didn't get Covid-19, but he was a victim of it anyway
Opinion by Alyssa Klein
As a sibling to someone who overdosed at the start of the Covid-19 crisis, I'm reminded every day that our national conversation ignores the uncounted victims of the pandemic. Victims like my brother, David, who passed away on March 24 in Orange County, California. While his death certificate states "acute polydrug intoxication due to the combined effects of heroin [and other drugs]" as his cause of death, my brother is another tragedy of this moment.
What's behind Trump's 'I know nothing' defense
By Michael D'Antonio
For a guy who brags about having a great memory, President Donald Trump sure has trouble remembering the folks who really like him, which, given his well-documented desire to be loved by supporters, is also quite strange. Almost as strange as QAnon.
What working-class Americans want
Opinion by Jim McDermott
Forty years ago, I worked on an assembly line and as a gas station attendant. Those minimum wage jobs helped put me through college and law school. Throw in government grants, scholarships, low interest loans and hard work, and a kid from an ordinary background was launched on a path to economic prosperity. I'm a good example of the upward mobility that has always been a critical feature of American capitalism. In hindsight, I can see that being born a white male also helped me.
Trump's despicable rants against Whitmer
Opinion by Dean Obeidallah
Joe Biden's exasperated comment summed up what so many of us feel. "What the hell's the matter with this guy?" said Biden Friday of Donald Trump's continuing attacks on Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, even after the recent announcement of an alleged right-wing terrorist plot to kidnap and possibly kill her. "It's despicable," said Biden.
Trump wasted a big opportunity
Opinion by Joe Lockhart
After roughly 20 minutes of trying to pin down President Donald Trump on why he models dangerous behavior during a pandemic, NBC's Savannah Guthrie spoke for most Americans in frustration by pointing out he was the President of the United States, not someone's "crazy uncle." But for anyone watching Thursday night, what they got was a full dose of America's crazy uncle.
California relief should never have been a question
Opinion by Tess Taylor
It was dawn on Friday, and all night scalding winds had been blowing. Our kids were sleeping on the floor downstairs to stay cool. We don't have AC, and until recently, in the Bay Area, we never needed it. Now, after four years of devastating early fall heat waves, high winds and worsening fires, I realize it's instinctive to keep the kids close on nights like this. We know full well what sweating through a hot windy October night means: Red flag warnings, constant vigilance, waking up to check air quality for signs of smoke. It means keeping an eye on the bag packed by the door.
Biden hides his views on key issues
Opinion by Alice Stewart
There's some comfort after watching former Vice President Joe Biden's Town Hall on ABC: The 17 million Americans who have already voted didn't miss a thing. It was 90 minutes of nothing new, nothing eventful, nothing earth-shattering. The truth is, no news is just fine when you are the frontrunner. When you're leading key polls by double digits with less than three weeks until the election, you don't run your mouth, you let the clock run out.
'The West Wing' reunion shows us a world very, very far away
Opinion by Jeff Yang
In the latest of what seems like a steady stream of television and film reunions in the time of Covid, the well-preserved cast of the beloved political drama "The West Wing" came together Thursday for a staged reading of one of the show creator Aaron Sorkin's favorite episodes: "Hartsfield's Landing," the 14th episode of the show's third season (of seven, for those who may have watched occasionally but failed to stick it out to the bitter end) which originally aired in 2002.
Why your vote could be a life-or-death decision
Opinion by Robin Cogan, Barbara Glickstein and Diana J. Mason
After months of downplaying the dangers of the novel coronavirus, President Donald Trump has received no-expense-spared, cutting-edge treatment for his Covid-19 infection. Of course, it is reasonable that the President of the United States and commander in chief is treated aggressively -- the country's national security and leadership continuity are vital to our well-being and safety.
Packing the Supreme Court is a slippery slope
Opinion by Walter Olson
"Nine seems to be a good number. It's been that way for a long time ... I think it was a bad idea when President Franklin Roosevelt tried to pack the court."
A modest proposal on SCOTUS
Opinion by Judd Gregg and Charles Wheelan
The Senate confirmation hearings for Amy Coney Barrett concluded Thursday. All indications are that President Donald Trump's nominee will be confirmed to the Supreme Court, bringing the number of conservative leaning justices to six -- an ironclad majority. However, that is not likely to be the end of the story.
'The West Wing' reunion shows us a world very, very far away
Opinion by Jeff Yang
In the latest of what seems like a steady stream of television and film reunions in the time of Covid, the well-preserved cast of the beloved political drama "The West Wing" came together Thursday for a staged reading of one of the show creator Aaron Sorkin's favorite episodes: "Hartsfield's Landing," the 14th episode of the show's third season (of seven, for those who may have watched occasionally but failed to stick it out to the bitter end) which originally aired in 2002.
Why Barrett could be bad news for Trump
Opinion by Laura Beers
Amy Coney Barrett's appointment to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court goes to the heart of the question of what feminism actually is. Is supporting the promotion of women inherently feminist? One of Ginsburg's best-known quotes came from an interview in 2015 when she asserted, "People ask me sometimes, when—when do you think it will it be enough? When will there be enough women on the (Supreme) Court? And my answer is when there are nine."
Amy Coney Barrett's near-perfect performance
Opinion by Paul Callan
Judge Amy Coney Barrett delivered a relatively flawless showing in her controversial Senate confirmation hearing on Tuesday. A few hours into the questioning a senator asked her to display the notes she was using to provide her detailed answers. She picked up a white notepad with nothing on it but the inscription, "United States Senate" as the hearing room erupted in laughter.
Amy Coney Barrett's alarming non-answers
Opinion by Elliot Williams
Judge Amy Coney Barrett isn't thefirst Supreme Court nominee in recent history to hide behind the disingenuous notion that a nominee "can't offer an opinion" on possible legal issues that may come before her as a future justice.
Supreme Court's size is only part of the problem
Opinion by Judith Resnik
As the Senate Judiciary Committee begins hearings over Judge Amy Coney Barrett's appointment to the US Supreme Court, the size of the nine-member court has become an election issue. If, as expected, Barrett is confirmed, the toxic polarization gripping the nation could be further mirrored in federal courts, which are supposed to be places where open-minded judges aim to treat all people equally and render just decisions.
Really, Sen. Cruz? This is what you asked
Opinion by Laura Coates
Really, Sen. Ted Cruz? After speaking for over 20 minutes, the Texas Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee decided to ask Judge Amy Coney Barrett, a seminal legal mind, about her children's distance learning and piano lessons. Let's just say, it struck a chord with women everywhere.
Biden is no friend to Maduro
Opinion by Amanda Mattingly
I've met Nicolás Maduro, and he's about the last person you'd want running a country. He's an incompetent authoritarian. He has driven his country and its economy into the ground.
Ashley Judd: Women, we are in the fight of our lives
By Ashley Judd
The afterglow of an idyllic late summer walk with my love around Walden Pond was shattered when my best friend texted that she was bawling because of the news. I opened my news app, saw the name RUTH and the word DEAD, and was instantly, searingly, shattered.
Jackie Kennedy like we've never seen her before
By Kate Andersen Brower and Kate Bennett, CNN
She is arguably the most iconic first lady, but Jacqueline Kennedy is still very much a mystery. And that is exactly how she always wanted it to be.
I'm voting for Biden. I also think the Senate should confirm Barrett
Opinion by Thomas Koenig
The coming weeks may be brutal: The level of partisan rancor and performative outrage that we've seen over the timing of Judge Amy Coney Barrett's nomination may intensify during the confirmation hearings. And if that's the case, the hearings will be more than just terrible TV. They will underscore the fact that the American people -- and their senators -- are sorely lacking in basic civic knowledge. There may be protesters from the gallery shouting, for example, that Judge Barrett hates women's uteruses, and senators will likely be pandering to such unfounded criticism.
There's no good case against confirming Barrett
Opinion by Erika Bachiochi
If recent history is any indicator, one can no longer be sure what to anticipate in a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for a Supreme Court nominee. Admittedly, as a vocal fan of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, I feared the worst on the opening day of the confirmation hearings.
Black children must be able to believe in themselves. That's what Black History Month is for
Opinion by Akyaaba Addai-Sebo
Black History Month (BHM) is a celebration of our diversity -- all the colors of the rainbow that sparkle out of the black hole of creation. We share common roots in the dark, tropical wombs of our mothers and our strength lies in the variety within our oneness.
Donald Trump's troubling vital signs
Opinion by Richard Galant, CNN
Doctors have been searching for precise indicators of the health of their patients at least since the early 1600s, when a professor of medicine, Santorio Santori, helped perfect devices to measure body temperature and pulse rate. His goal, as Fabrizio Bigotti wrote, was "medical mathematics."
What Trump really wants from his risky rallies
Opinion by Dean Obeidallah
Nothing sums up more why Donald Trump is in such a rush to get back on the campaign trail than his Saturday event at the White House. The hundreds of supporters who gathered on the South Lawn dressed in MAGA gear not only exploded in cheers when the President spoke, they chanted in unison: "We love you!" In response, Trump beamed as he told them, "I love you, too."
Robert Redford: The big question I want answered
Opinion by Robert Redford
I'm not in the habit of quoting lines from movies I've appeared in, but every once in a while, something brings one of those old lines to mind. Recently, I've been thinking of a scene from a film I did in 1972 called "The Candidate."
Desperate Trump is putting democracy at risk
Opinion by Julian Zelizer
The President ended one of the craziest weeks in recent history with a blistering speech on the White House balcony. In his first public event since he tested positive for Covid-19, Trump stood before an adoring crowd and threw them some red meat. He repeated falsehoods about Joe Biden wanting to defund the police and insisted, despite the coronavirus' recent spread through the White House, that "it's going to disappear."
How to vote and make sure others do too
Opinion by David Nickerson and Todd Rogers
As behavioral scientists who study how to increase election turnout, we have become quite accustomed to receiving this desperate message from friends and colleagues: "I don't live in a battleground state. How can I increase turnout?" They badly want to participate in the election, but because their vote may have little influence in determining the outcomes in their home states, they want to help drive turnout where it will make the most difference.
The seismic change after Nov. 3
Opinion by SE Cupp
"This is the most important election of our lifetime."
Why Trump could win Michigan again
Opinion by Nolan Finley
There's no way Hillary Clinton should have lost Michigan in 2016. And there's no way Donald Trump should win it again in 2020.
Trump's train is running off the tracks
Opinion by John Avlon
The fever may be starting to break. Donald Trump has held his party in line with bullying tactics and the white-hot love of the conservative populist base.
The Republican who could help defeat Trump
Opinion by Arick Wierson and Bradley Honan
After the nation and the world witnessed President Donald Trump's selfish and dangerous game of political theater ever since he tested positive for Covid-19, there remains no doubt: Trump is not fit to hold the office now, and he certainly shouldn't be allowed to govern for another four years. America needs to put this unwitting experiment in kakistocracy to an abrupt end, and the best man to do that is former President George W. Bush by endorsing Joe Biden for president.
'Twindemic' testing chaos: The need for a national flu and Covid-19 plan is long overdue
Opinion by Thomas McGinn and Ankita Sagar
At the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, the nation witnessed firsthand the pressure and challenges that face our health care system when hospitals and health care providers deal with high patient volumes. At Northwell Health, we took care of far more patients outside the hospitals than inside the hospitals. Through all this we learned that Covid-19 patients required an unprecedented level of care.
GOP's push to confirm Amy Coney Barrett is a reckless farce
Opinion by Jeremy Paris
The pandemic that President Donald Trump has so profoundly failed to manage now threatens his administration's top priority: installing Judge Amy Coney Barrett to fill the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's seat on the Supreme Court.
With virtual debate, US wins and Trump loses
Opinion by Jill Filipovic
The President of the United States is scared, and it's starting to show. Donald Trump has tested positive for Covid-19, as have more than a dozen people close to him, including several sitting senators, members of his debate prep team, several members of his staff, his campaign manager and his own wife, first lady Melania Trump. The organizers of his next debate with Democratic nominee Joe Biden, which was scheduled for Thursday of next week, wisely announced a plan to move the debate to an online format. After all, who in their right mind would put a coronavirus patient in an enclosed room with other people, including vulnerable American voters and at least one other senior citizen, for at least 90 minutes of yelling and spewing?
Trump's Covid failure could cost him Wisconsin
Opinion by Kathleen Dunn
Louisa May Alcott, author of "Little Women," wrote in her famous novel, "I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship." If only President Donald Trump had learned how to sail the American government's ship. Perhaps he might have been able to calm the storm that is the Covid-19 pandemic. His failure, however, has brought us perilously close to capsizing.
Mike Pence's upside-down world
Opinion by Todd Graham
Anything would have been better than the first debate between President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden. So, Wednesday night's vice presidential debate, in some respects, had a lower bar to clear.
What Democrats must figure out to win the election
Opinion by Richard Gabriel
As a trial consultant, I have spent the better part of my 35-year career helping lawyers understand how trials can be easily lost even when they clearly have all the evidence and law on their side. It's an uncomfortable conversation and it comes down to a simple question: "Would you rather be right or would you rather win?" Often, you can't have both.
America is hurtling toward a crossroads on November 3. What comes next?
Opinion by SE Cupp
"This is the most important election of our lifetime."
Biden and Trump are failing the American worker
Opinion by Oren Cass
As painful as the Covid-19 economic fallout has been, the unemployment rate today is lower -- and the average rate this year has been lower -- than the average during the four years of former President Barack Obama's first term, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That is no defense of the current catastrophe -- only an observation that the catastrophe is not a once-in-a-century occurrence but one to which Americans have become quite accustomed.
Lindsey Graham's big political miscalculation
Opinion by Issac Bailey
South Carolina may be on the verge of what seemed like an impossibility: becoming the first state in US history to be represented by two Black men in the Senate simultaneously. It's no longer a far-fetched idea because Democrat Jamie Harrison has become a formidable challenger for the seat occupied by long-serving Republican Lindsey Graham. Political analysts have moved the race into a toss-up category from solidly Republican as a bevy of polls show Graham and Harrison in a virtual tie.
Trump's erratic actions put US at risk
Opinion by Michael D'Antonio
President Donald Trump has abandoned work on providing economic aid to Americans devasted by the effects of the coronavirus pandemic. Businesses, families, and workers desperate for assistance will have to wait until after the election, "when, immediately after I win, we will pass a major Stimulus Bill that focuses on hardworking Americans and Small Business," he announced on Twitter Tuesday.
My father died from Covid-19. Trump just spit on his grave
Opinion by Chris Pernell
Donald Trump is infected with coronavirus -- and because of it we are sicker. "Don't be afraid of Covid. Don't let it dominate your life," he tweeted on Monday before Marine One flew him from the Walter Reed hospital back to the White House. Some 211,000 souls and counting are lost, but their loved ones are asked to go away quietly and to bury their pain and truth because the show must go on.
Sean Penn and José Andrés: Trump has a duty
Opinion by Sean Penn and José Andrés
For more than seven months we've been fighting an invisible enemy on American soil. Every day, American citizens are suffering from the devastation of Covid-19. It has been a vicious and indiscriminate force ravaging communities, claiming more than 210,000 American lives and shattering the economy.
Trump, the patient who thinks he is always right
Opinion by Kent Sepkowitz
I have not been involved in the medical care of any president of the United States. That said, I have treated many patients who hate being in the hospital, who distrust medicine, doctors and the entire health care razzmatazz who only want to get home and who spend most of any conversation pleading to be discharged.
What the Church of Trump is costing America
Opinion by Peniel E. Joseph
How did the President of the United States become one of the nation's largest threats to public health and safety? When one man became head of "church" and state: the Church of Trump, that is.
Biden's Gettysburg address is best of his campaign
Opinion by John Avlon
Four weeks from Election Day, with a 16-point lead in the polls, Joe Biden decided it was time to give a Big Speech -- and he chose the biggest historical arena possible.
Why Pennsylvanians should support Biden
Opinion by Michael A. Nutter
The first thing most people in Pennsylvania know about former Vice President Joe Biden is that he's from Scranton, the sixth largest city in the state, and home to nearly 77,000 people. He understands and shares our values of hard work, facing tough times with resolve and being decent and kind to neighbors and strangers alike.
How Trump could win the presidency and have Harris as his VP
Opinion by Robert Alexander and David B. Cohen
The United States has faced an extraordinary set of challenges in 2020. Foreign election interference, an impeachment trial, a global health pandemic, natural disasters, economic instability, mass protests and civil unrest have plagued the country.
Same-sex marriage is at real risk at Supreme Court
Opinion by Tim Holbrook
The nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has generated discussion about the future of Roe v. Wade, the case in which the Supreme Court legalized abortion across the country. Such conversations are not surprising given the role that Justice Ginsburg played in advancing women's rights and Judge Barrett's writings as a judge and a law professor.
Trump's Covid-19 recklessness is costing the US
Opinion by Jeffrey Sachs
President Donald Trump's recklessness about protecting himself and the White House against the novel coronavirus not only led to his own infection, but likely to the infections of many other political leaders and White House staff in recent days.
Trump's three escalating crises
Opinion by Richard Galant, CNN
They were six days that shook America:
How Jill Biden would redefine first lady
Opinion by Kate Andersen Brower, CNN
In many ways, having Jill Biden as the next first lady of the United States wouldn't be revolutionary. The 69-year-old educator would be similar to most of the presidential spouses before her: She's a straight, White woman who's been around politics for decades, and holds some influence over her partner's decisions (see: Kamala Harris).
Will the virus change Donald Trump?
Opinion by Michael D'Antonio
On day three of his hospitalization with coronavirus, The White House released images from Walter Reed Medical Center showing a President Donald Trump rarely seen. Rendered wan by the disease that has devastated the country he is supposed to lead, he sat in shirtsleeves looking weary and worried. With no bulky suit to broaden his shoulders, Trump seemed more like a vulnerable old man than the fearsome figure revealed in Bob Woodward's bestselling "Rage."
How Trump wound up in the hospital
Opinion by Peter Bergen, CNN National Security Analyst
President Donald Trump has had a lot to say about the coronavirus, a great deal of it misleading or simply false, and he has also modeled and even encouraged irresponsible behavior, all of which has surely contributed to the spread of the virus, since the President has the most powerful megaphone in the United States.
What a Confederate general taught me about US
Opinion by Jane Greenway Carr
As a schoolchild growing up in Tennessee, I visited the battlefields of Fort Pillow and Shiloh and toured Andrew Jackson's home, the Hermitage. When I was a teenager, I haunted the blues clubs of Beale Street (the ones that would let me in without ID). I have watched football at the Liberty Bowl and basketball and bands at the Pyramid (before it became a Bass Pro Shop), I have driven through the Smoky Mountains and walked the floor of the Tennessee State House. (I have not been to Dollywood. I know, I hate myself too.)
Don't let Abraham Accords become arms deals
Opinion by William D. Hartung
The normalization agreement between Israel and the UAE, dubbed formally as the "Abraham Accords," could potentially spark a new Middle East arms race. Given the multiple conflicts already raging in the region, all fueled by imported arms, that cannot be allowed to happen.
Trump's call for poll-watchers summons dark history
Opinion by Nicole Hemmer
Chris Wallace ended the first presidential debate Tuesday with a softball question, asking the candidates if they would urge their supporters not to engage in "civil unrest" around the election. Joe Biden gave a swift and clear yes. President Donald Trump did not.
Trump is trying to split Biden from the left
Opinion by Jeff Weaver
The first presidential debate this week was indisputably one of the ugliest in modern US history. President Donald Trump interrupted Joe Biden at nearly every turn, and CNN's Chris Cuomo later described the event as a "shit show."
Even the President of the United States isn't safe
By Julian Zelizer, CNN Political Analyst
In a presidential election with more shocking moments than any other, the news of October 2 has rattled the nation and the world. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have been diagnosed with Covid-19. With only a few weeks left until Election Day, the President of the United States must now recover from a virus that has ravaged the world in 2020 and upended our lives.
Trump encourages voter intimidation tactics
Opinion by Frida Ghitis
One day, when I was reporting from Cuba in the late 1990s, I received a message from a dissident group about a protest for democracy and human rights they were planning to hold at a public park. Despite the obvious risks, they had decided to go forward with the protest, given that Havana was about to hold a major international gathering and the Castro regime had promised to ease up on repression.
Biden's secret body language weapon
Opinion by Bill McGowan and Juliana Silva
The fact that Tuesday night's debate in Cleveland was more of a crash than a clash will no doubt dominate the media coverage and people's memory of the event. No matter how much we would like to wipe the image of that disgraceful spectacle from our consciousness, the indelible stain of a President of the United States behaving like a juvenile delinquent initiating a food fight will be tough to erase. But what may get overlooked amid the pandemonium that erupted at the first of three showdowns between former Vice President Joe Biden and President Donald Trump was the stark contrast in the two candidates' body language.
Why this man is too emotional to be president
Opinion by Jill Filipovic
Tuesday's presidential debate may have been the most emotional in history -- thanks to the interruptions, angry fits and outbursts from President Donald Trump. There was little policy discussion, rational debate or rationality at all (although Democratic candidate Joe Biden tried). Instead, viewers were treated to the rantings of a hysterical, mercurial man who wants to be reelected president.
Trump encourages voter intimidation tactics in bid to hold on to power
Opinion by Frida Ghitis
One day, when I was reporting from Cuba in the late 1990s, I received a message from a dissident group about a protest for democracy and human rights they were planning to hold at a public park. Despite the obvious risks, they had decided to go forward with the protest, given that Havana was about to hold a major international gathering and the Castro regime had promised to ease up on repression.
The BREATHE Act is the policy change US needs
Opinion by Derrick Johnson and Gina Clayton-Johnson
The grand jury's decision to not charge the officers who killed Breonna Taylor was heartbreaking in its familiarity. From Eric Garner to Michael Brown to Sandra Bland and now Breonna Taylor, the murder of Black people by law enforcement in this country often seems not to be considered a crime. The grand jury in Kentucky played into this painful feedback loop, charging one officer out of three for wanton endangerment, but not for taking Breonna's life.
On abortion, ACB doesn't speak for US Christians
Opinion by Guthrie Graves-Fitzsimmons
It wasn't a surprise that President Donald Trump announced Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to serve on the US Supreme Court Saturday. Barrett's conservative Catholic faith was a flashpoint during her confirmation hearings in 2017 to serve as a federal appeals court judge and is coming up again now.
Turns out Trump is not a 'winner' after all
Opinion by Michael D'Antonio
"The beauty of me is that I'm very rich." Donald Trump said that in 2011, when he was talking about a White House run. In 2015 he took his ride down a golden escalator and made his super-patriot's promise to use his unmatched business skills to make America great again, as great as he was. Enough people believed it to win him the Electoral College (losing the popular vote) and the Oval Office.
Chris Wallace's debate topic is so very wrong
Opinion by Steven A. Holmes, CNN
Chris Wallace has the well-deserved reputation of a hard-hitting and fair journalist. He is one of the few at Fox News willing to bring as much heat to President Donald Trump as he is to any Democrat or progressive activist.
The most important national security question Trump and Biden need to address
By Paul Cruickshank
As the world braces for a possible second wave of the Covid-19 pandemic, there is also growing concern in the counterterrorism, scientific and global public health communities over the potential future threat posed by bio-engineered pathogens.
Amy Coney Barrett a perfect choice for half of US
Editor's note: Commentators weigh in on President Donald Trump's selection of Amy Coney Barrett. The views expressed in this commentary belong to the authors. View more opinion at CNN.
Breonna Taylor's death reminds us
Opinion by Lisa Respers France, CNN
Some days I feel like a woman without a country.
How weaponizing outrage paid off for GOP
Opinion by Julian Zelizer, CNN Political Analyst
President Donald Trump seems intent on sowing doubt over the election results, creating a pathway to contest the results and remain in power even if he loses.
Trump's strategy is psychological warfare
Opinion by Ruth Ben-Ghiat
During the third presidential debate in 2016, candidate Donald Trump made headlines for refusing to answer Fox News journalist Chris Wallace, who was moderating, on whether he would accept the result of the upcoming election. "I will look at it at the time. I will keep you in suspense," he said, claiming the race was already fixed against him. "That's not how democracy works," replied his opponent, Hillary Clinton, who went on to win the popular vote but lose the election.
Amy Coney Barrett a perfect choice for half of America
Editor's note: Commentators weigh in on President Donald Trump's selection of Amy Coney Barrett. The views expressed in this commentary belong to the authors. View more opinion at CNN.
RBG faced opposition from the start
Opinion by Renee Knake Jefferson and Hannah Brenner Johnson
When President Bill Clinton selected Ruth Bader Ginsburg as the nominee from his Supreme Court shortlist in 1993, women's groups—both conservative and liberal—raised concerns. As we discuss in our book "Shortlisted," some feminists criticized Ginsburg's position on equality as one that ignored the historic oppression of women. She advocated that men and women should be treated equally under the law, rather than receive special treatment based on their sex. Additionally, abortion opponents and champions alike expressed trepidation about her appointment.
Trump-Biden debate moderators face a huge challenge
Opinion by Todd Graham
Complaining about debate moderators has now become part of the game, the same way we argue about officiating in sports. According to a report by the Annenberg Debate Reform Working Group, which was created to figure out how to increase the value of presidential general election debates, there are four main areas of criticism aimed at presidential debate moderators. I'll address these and provide some workable tips that can be used by this year's group.
Breonna Taylor's death reminds me this country doesn't love me as much as I love it
Opinion by Lisa Respers France, CNN
Some days I feel like a woman without a country.
Treaties alone can't protect women from violence
By Rahila Gupta
Women have always been punching bags for men's anger in the patriarchal systems we live in. It comes as no surprise that rates of violence are up everywhere as the pandemic and its lockdowns push women further into men's deadly embrace.
Will the public trust a Covid-19 vaccine?
Opinion by Edgar K. Marcuse
Operation Warp Speed, the mission to develop an effective Covid-19 vaccine, seeks to deliver 300,000 doses by January 2021. According to projections from the University of Washington, by then the US death toll from the novel coronavirus will likely have reached nearly 400,000.
Listen to what Olivia Troye says about Trump
Opinion by Miles Taylor
Last week the White House was hit by a bombshell: A former top aide to Vice President Mike Pence, who was intimately involved in the administration's response to the coronavirus, blamed President Trump for mishandling the crisis and causing unnecessary deaths.
Biden could make up for his criminal justice record
Opinion by Ashish Prashar and DeAnna Hoskins
Soon, hopefully, former Vice President Joe Biden may be able to atone for missteps made by him, as well as State and Local officials, in designing a criminal justice system that perpetually disenfranchises people of color and the poor. Earlier this year, when the former vice president spoke on justice issues, he recognized his shortcomings: "I know we haven't always gotten things right, but I've always tried."
Trump's amateurish mistake
Opinion by Juliana Silva and Bill McGowan, CNN
If the Las Vegas oddsmakers were handicapping the upcoming Presidential debates, they might be inclined to favor President Donald Trump to win -- and Trump has only himself to blame for that.
'RBG' filmmakers: How she wanted to be remembered
Opinion by Betsy West and Julie Cohen
Back when a woman could easily be fired for being pregnant; when a wife needed her husband's permission to get bank credit; and when a married man could not be charged with raping his spouse, a young lawyer had a radical idea. She believed that the US Constitution should treat every American equally, regardless of gender.
Trump told us our democracy is at risk -- from him
Opinion by John Avlon
American democracy has been defined by the peaceful transfer of power. Donald Trump seems to have other ideas.
The only sure way to prevent Trump from killing democracy
By Frida Ghitis
President Donald Trump refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses the election, raising the already blaring alarms over threats to America's democracy to a deafening volume.
How to remember the 'Notorious RBG'
Opinion by Peniel Joseph
Ruth Bader Ginsburg's legacy, in so many ways, is fundamentally important to understanding our current national and global age of Black Lives Matter. Indeed, her presence in popular culture rests in large part on the global popularity of hip hop, which represents a defining cultural innovation of post-civil rights America.
Greece can't shelter refugees alone. Europe must help
Opinion by Lena Headey
Moria. It was hell on earth. Unclean, unsafe. Human rights didn't exist.
What we owe the 200,000 victims
Opinion by Dean Obeidallah
On Monday, with the US on the verge of reaching the solemn number of 200,000 dead from Covid-19, Donald Trump appeared on Fox News where the topic of the virus was raised. Did Trump express sympathy for the heartbreaking losses caused to families across the nation from this deadly pandemic? Nope, instead he patted himself on the back for doing what he called "a phenomenal job" in handling Covid-19, giving himself an "A+." The only criticism Trump would offer was regarding the public relations for the virus, saying in that area, "I give myself a D." He blamed the low grade on "fake news."
Democrats also play politics with Supreme Court seats
Opinion by Charlie Dent
The American people owe Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg a measureless debt of gratitude for her distinguished service on the Supreme Court. Her inspirational life story and work helped advance justice and opportunities for women in our country.
Biden's centrism doesn't hold up
Opinion by Lanhee Chen
Joe Biden's campaign policy agenda will add $5.4 trillion in new federal spending over the next decade, according to a new analysis by the Penn Wharton Budget Model, a nonpartisan research-based initiative at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. Biden has many aggressive plans, which include remaking the US health care system, expanding housing subsidies, and making public colleges and universities tuition-free for families making less than $125,000 a year. In fact, one economist concluded that Biden's policy platform added up to "the largest proposed spending increase by a presidential nominee since George McGovern," the Democrat who in 1972 proposed a universal basic income for all Americans.
McConnell is going to turn me into a socialist
Opinion by Issac Bailey
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is about to turn me into a socialist or whatever is necessary to save this nation's fast-fading democracy. If he and Senate Republicans move forward with quickly replacing the recently-deceased Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, I would have lost all faith in what I believed this democratic experiment to be. In a healthy democracy, Republican senators would vow not to move forward with a vote on Ginsburg's replacement until early next year or only accept a consensus pick who can garner bipartisan support. Maybe a nominee like Merrick Garland, the man whom now retired-Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch told then-President Barack Obama would easily win Senate confirmation -- until Obama actually nominated Garland. But this is not a healthy democracy.
How RBG would have powered through this crisis
Opinion by Neil Siegel
I was very fortunate to serve as one of Ruth Bader Ginsburg's law clerks during the US Supreme Court's October 2003 term. I was also blessed by her presence in my life -- and in the lives of my daughters -- in the years following my clerkship. She always found time when we asked. She always asked how we were doing, particularly during difficult times.
The disturbing truth about plastic recycling
Opinion by Alex Totterman
Our oceans are now awash in at least 150 million tons of plastic, an amount that researchers say will soon surpass the weight of all the fish in the sea.
Trump-Biden just got fiercer
Opinion by Richard Galant, CNN
The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Friday brought an outpouring of tributes for a freedom fighter whose determination and skill led to landmark changes in the law. It also immediately prompted a partisan battle over her replacement that is likely to supercharge the November election, already considered the most consequential in decades.
Obamacare could be doomed if Trump fills seat
Opinion by Abdul El-Sayed
The prospect of a third Supreme Court pick for President Donald Trump looms large following the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday. In 2016, when President Obama nominated Judge Merrick Garland for the high court, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell refused to even bring Garland up -- arguing that, in an election year, it was only proper that he should wait for the will of the people. It was "about a principle, not a person," McConnell said back then.
Why I confronted Trump at the town hall
Opinion by Ellesia A. Blaque
There are millions of people across the globe just like me. People beaten down by diseases we didn't ask for; diseases we were born with, or acquired. We are people who must face them on a daily basis, and for the rest of our lives, and for which we are minimized and ignored.
Biden's mistakes could cost him badly
Opinion by Alice Stewart
Joe Biden's campaign is no doubt feeling pretty good after the former vice president's Thursday night performance in the CNN drive-in town hall in Scranton, Pennsylvania. With 47 days until election day, Biden took full advantage of the national spotlight to address the issues, call for unity and attack his opponent, President Donald Trump.
A monstrous allegation against ICE
Opinion by Allison Hope
In 1961, famed civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer's uterus was removed by a White doctor without her consent while she was undergoing surgery to remove a tumor. Sterilization of Black women was so common at the time that the practice was dubbed a "Mississippi appendectomy."
It is hard for me to contemplate the Supreme Court without Ginsburg
By Brenda Feigen
This article about Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away Friday, was originally published in 2018.
Biden's mistakes could cost him badly in debate with Trump
Opinion by Alice Stewart
Joe Biden's campaign is no doubt feeling pretty good after the former vice president's Thursday night performance in the CNN drive-in town hall in Scranton, Pennsylvania. With 47 days until election day, Biden took full advantage of the national spotlight to address the issues, call for unity and attack his opponent, President Donald Trump.
Biden showed his kind of leadership
Opinion by Jess McIntosh
For a couple of hours Thursday night, America was treated with honesty and compassion by a man who wants to hold its highest office. That could be the entire review right there, how jarring and unusual it was to visualize a president who could clear the extremely low bar of telling the truth and caring about pain. We've had presidents like that before, of course, but after a particularly brutal news week it was starting to feel like that kind of leadership belongs to a different era.
College leaders deserve an F for their reopening
Opinion by Kent Sepkowitz
College life right now is a mess: there has been an explosion of Covid-19 cases on college campuses since some schools resumed in person. According to The New York Times weekly tally updated on September 10, there have been 88,000 Covid-19 cases across 1,190 college campuses. Of these, "more than 61,000 cases came since late August."
The disturbing truth about plastic recycling
Opinion by Alex Totterman
Our oceans are now awash in at least 150 million tons of plastic, an amount that researchers say will soon surpass the weight of all the fish in the sea.
Trump's bogus health care promise on display
By Frida Ghitis
President Donald Trump is used to taking questions from celebrity anchors at Fox News, who lob softballs greased with praise. His appearance in a town hall Tuesday night, held by ABC News, featuring questions from undecided voters in Pennsylvania, was an altogether different experience. Faced with demands for answers, Trump resorted to his standard lies about what he has done and what his rival, Democratic candidate Joe Biden, would do as president.
Why I confronted Trump at the town hall in Philadelphia
Opinion by Ellesia A. Blaque
There are millions of people across the globe just like me. People beaten down by diseases we didn't ask for; diseases we were born with, or acquired. We are people who must face them on a daily basis, and for the rest of our lives, and for which we are minimized and ignored.
Finding meaning in Rosh Hashanah amid Covid-19
Opinion by Joshua M. Davidson
Austrian neurologist, psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl once said, "When we are no longer able to change a situation... we are challenged to change ourselves."
Where's your health care plan, Mr. President?
Opinion by John Avlon, CNN Senior Political Analyst
Pandemics don't care about partisan politics. So when Robert Redfield — President Donald Trump's director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a lifelong conservative — testified to Congress Wednesday that a Covid-19 vaccine wouldn't be ready before the election and probably would not be available to the general public until next summer, he was speaking as a scientist.
Historian: I watched 'Mulan' so you don't have to
Opinion by Kelly Hammond
With the new live-action version of "Mulan," Disney missed the mark with viewers in China and the United States. How did they mess this up so badly? There are numerous controversies surrounding the film's release, but most of them do not even have to do with the fact that the movie itself is a boring, drab and inaccurate mess. Although the story is well known around the world, the live-action movie is slow, repetitive, and lacking in any substantial character development.
The Joe Rogan presidential debate America needs
Opinion by Alice Stewart
It was 60 years ago when tens of millions of Americans turned on the television or radio to see Sen. John F. Kennedy face off with Vice President Nixon in the nation's first televised presidential debate. The assessment was that Kennedy won by looking "tan and fit," while Nixon looked "like death warmed over."
I lost my legs fighting for America
Opinion by Dan Berschinski
In March of 2010, I sat in my wheelchair in a cramped kitchen in the basement of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center's amputee rehab clinic. A lone Secret Service agent stood quietly against one wall and I sat at a kitchen table. To my immediate left, with our elbows almost touching was then-Vice President Joe Biden. Across the table was his wife, Jill Biden, and also at the table were two other seriously wounded soldiers and our significant others.
Why America needs presidential debates
Opinion by Diana B. Carlin and Mitchell S. McKinney
It is unlikely that anyone would make a hiring decision without interviewing them, based only on some combination of the candidate's resume, testimonials from family members, social media comments and scurrilous accusations from anonymous critics. That's why we disagree with those who want to scrap presidential debates, the metaphorical equivalent of a presidential job interview.
The magic moments that win presidential debates
Opinion by Thomas Balcerski
The upcoming presidential debates promise to be a watershed moment in this election. Democratic challenger Joe Biden has been preparing to debate sitting Republican President Donald Trump. By contrast, according to NBC News, the President has reportedly eschewed formal preparation, arguing that debate "isn't something you have to practice."
Unmasking Trump's real governing philosophy
Opinion by Joe Lockhart
Has America ever seen a presidential campaign like this one? One that involves a candidate as out-of-the-ordinary as President Donald Trump, with his small but rabid base, running for reelection during a global pandemic, a crushing economic crisis and a deadly season of back-to-back-to-back natural disasters?
America's devastating divorce from science
Opinion by Naomi Oreskes
What do you say about a 75-year-old dream that has died? In 1945, Vannevar Bush, the MIT dean who mobilized American science during World War II, laid out the blueprint for what would become the social contract between science and American society for the next half century.
What Breonna Taylor settlement misses
Opinion by Jill Filipovic
On Tuesday, the City of Louisville, Kentucky, finally settled a wrongful death lawsuit in the killing of Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT shot dead in her own house by police officers who entered on a no-knock warrant. The settlement is for $12 million, every penny of which Taylor's family deserves, and not a single cent of which will bring her back.
Red and Blue America took different roads
Opinion by Jeffrey Sachs
America has been coming apart at the seams, with Democrats and Republicans increasingly unable of communicating with one another. Red states and blue states, as decided in the 2016 election, have confronted each other in incomprehension, and are leading very different lives with very different economic conditions. Reuniting America requires a forward-looking path of sustainable development that benefits all regions, including the states that have been hard hit by the long-term decline in manufacturing jobs.
Trump's risky 'Hunger Games' rallies
Opinion by Dean Obeidallah
Welcome to Donald Trump's "Covid Hunger Games: Campaign edition." That's the only way to describe Trump's continued flouting at his campaign rallies of measures enacted to keep people safe from the coronavirus. We saw another example Saturday night when Trump held a rally in Nevada that violated the state's rules on limiting events to 50 people, ignored the state's mask mandate and jammed people on top of each other.
Trump tries to quash two damaging stories
Opinion by Richard Galant, CNN
In Lewis Carroll's 1865 storybook for children of all ages, Alice jumps down a rabbit hole. It spools into a Wonderland where eating a cake can make you grow nine feet tall. A place where rabbits wear waistcoats and kid gloves. Where Dodo birds set the rules for running races. And where the grinning Cheshire Cat sits in a tree and tells Alice that if you don't care where you're going to wind up, it really "doesn't matter which way you go."
America's devastating divorce from science
Opinion by Naomi Oreskes
What do you say about a 75-year-old dream that has died? In 1945, Vannevar Bush, the MIT dean who mobilized American science during World War II, laid out the blueprint for what would become the social contract between science and American society for the next half century.
Why this Woodward book is devastating
Opinion by Peter Bergen, CNN National Security Analyst
"Rage" may be Bob Woodward's most important book since "All the President's Men," in which he and Carl Bernstein laid out the history of Watergate.
4 things our nation can do to feed hungry students
Opinion by Ron Avi Astor
Much of the talk on school reopenings has focused on technology, how to balance parent work and childcare with online schooling, best techniques to engage students online and social-emotional learning (SEL) strategies. However, amid a pervasive pandemic, students' more basic needs -- like housing, mental health, the connectivity gap and food -- are not the top priority at the national level. They should be.
Kayleigh McEnany has crossed a line
Opinion by Joe Lockhart
Every single White House press secretary faces his or her own moment of truth on the job. Jerald terHorst, for example, resigned after just one month because he could not live with President Gerald Ford's decision to pardon his predecessor, President Richard Nixon.
Why America's two sides can't agree
Opinion by John R. Hibbing
In his August 20 acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention, Joe Biden said that "there is only one way forward. As a united America ... United in our dreams of a better future for us and for our children." He later asserted that, fortunately, we are indeed "united in our love of America and united in our love for each other."
Trump's risky rallies are straight out of 'Hunger Games'
Opinion by Dean Obeidallah
Welcome to Donald Trump's "Covid Hunger Games: Campaign edition." That's the only way to describe Trump's continued flouting at his campaign rallies of measures enacted to keep people safe from the coronavirus. We saw another example Saturday night when Trump held a rally in Nevada that violated the state's rules on limiting events to 50 people, ignored the state's mask mandate and jammed people on top of each other.
Election meddling could backfire on Putin
Opinion by Peter Zwack
Fresh allegations of Russian meddling in the upcoming US Presidential election shine a harsh spotlight on the dangerous deadlock between the nuclear-tipped powers. In a reprise of 2016, Moscow is apparently pushing hard for Donald Trump to win the White House. But is a Trump second term really in the Kremlin's best interest? Or would a Joe Biden win actually be the more pragmatic outcome for Russia?
Why this Woodward book is devastating to Trump
Opinion by Peter Bergen, CNN National Security Analyst
"Rage" may be Bob Woodward's most important book since "All the President's Men," in which he and Carl Bernstein laid out the history of Watergate.
What Trump has done to DOJ's civil rights division is a disgrace
Opinion by Kristen Clarke
When Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1957 63 years ago, legendary Harlem Rep. Adam Clayton Powell Jr. called it "the second emancipation."
Why Trump should worry about a rushed vaccine
By Kent Sepkowitz
This week, President Donald Trump again stated his hope that the United States would have a Covid-19 vaccine by year's end. He even suggested that maybe, just maybe, vaccinations might start by late October.
After 9/11, terror has morphed
Opinion by Farah Pandith and Jacob Ware
As another anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks approaches, we are reminded of how far we've come in the fight against global terrorism. Al Qaeda's devastating blows 19 years ago targeting America's political, economic, and military summits turned us into a more vigilant nation, determined to prevent any future attacks against the homeland.
I'm a Muslim US Marine. I served on 9/11
Opinion by Mansoor T. Shams
Like many of us, I vividly remember where I was and what I was doing on 9/11. Nearly one year earlier, I had made one of the toughest decisions any young 18-year-old American could ever make -- I raised my hand to "support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign and domestic" and became part of America's finest. I became a United States Marine.
Trump took the country for a spin around his bizarre fantasyland
Opinion by Michael D'Antonio
On Thursday afternoon during a news conference, President Donald Trump treated the country to a spin around his fantasyland, where he is a great leader besieged by meanies, and the needless death and suffering due to his failed response to the coronavirus pandemic are not worth acknowledging. Instead, he spoke about Fox News as if it is his security blanket and bashed Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden for using a teleprompter during his speeches.
In California, the sun never rose on Wednesday
Opinion by Tess Taylor
Wednesday, it was as if the sun never rose. Dawn was murky, and by 8 a.m., it seemed to get darker. A moldering reddish-bronze haze rose around us but also made no light. Inside the house, we re-lit our lamps against the gloaming. The windows swam black, and outside, all morning, above the trees, the sky glowed grisly red. Where we had left the windows open to the night breezes, our papers, clothes, combs and brushes were coated in a fine layer of ash. The air hung, gritty and oddly cold. It was hard not to feel a deep foreboding.
How Trump tried to squelch truth on Russia
Opinion by Miles Taylor
America's democratic process is in greater danger in the 2020 election cycle than it was in 2016.
Barr brings DOJ to a dark new low
Opinion by Elie Honig
Just when it seemed that Attorney General William Barr couldn't degrade the Justice Department any further with efforts to protect President Donald Trump's political fortunes, Barr has found a new low.
What the war on terror teaches us about Covid-19
Opinion by Jonah Bader
As we remember the tragedy of 9/11 and honor the thousands who lost their lives, we find ourselves in the midst of another tragedy. More than 191,000 Americans have died from Covid-19, and as many more could die by the end of the year.
The amazing bravery of three women
Opinion by Frida Ghitis
If Americans weren't consumed with the historic political contest at home, they would be riveted to the drama unfolding in Belarus.
In California, the sun never rose on Wednesday
Opinion by Tess Taylor
Wednesday, it was as if the sun never rose. Dawn was murky, and by 8 a.m., it seemed to get darker. A moldering reddish-bronze haze rose around us but also made no light. Inside the house, we re-lit our lamps against the gloaming. The windows swam black, and outside, all morning, above the trees, the sky glowed grisly red. Where we had left the windows open to the night breezes, our papers, clothes, combs and brushes were coated in a fine layer of ash. The air hung, gritty and oddly cold. It was hard not to feel a deep foreboding.
Two anniversaries Trump is dishonoring
Opinion by Catherine Powell and Camille Gear Rich
Last month, Americans celebrated the centennial of the 19th Amendment, recognizing women's right to vote. This celebration rings hollow -- as we hurtle toward the 2020 election -- if we fail to learn from the ways that race has been used to fracture women's efforts toward coalition politics and our collective understanding of our rights. For example, even as Senator Kamala Harris's historic role as the first woman of color to run for vice president on a major party ticket energizes feminist coalitions, Donald Trump's divisive manipulation of racial stereotypes seeks to fracture and obscure women's shared interests.
Trump damns himself
Opinion by SE Cupp
Just two days ago, the Trump campaign blasted an Atlantic story detailing the denigrating language the President allegedly used about fallen American troops for its author's use of anonymous sources.
Gender reveal parties a bad idea every way
Opinion by Allison Hope
If it weren't already a bad idea to throw a party without proper safety measures during a pandemic, one that sparks a massive forest fire is just arsenic-laced icing on the poison cake. A California family set off a "smoke-generating pyrotechnic device," causing a fire that is raging through the San Bernardino National Forest. The fire has burned thousands of acres, destroyed countless wildlife and may potentially cause a lot more devastation as the uncontrolled fire continues to burn.
The simple truth about teaching...and learning
Opinion by Jay Parini
As I'm about to begin a new semester online at Middlebury College, I'm reminded of James A. Garfield's comment that "the ideal college is Mark Hopkins on one end of a log and a student on the other." Hopkins was a philosopher (and later president) at Williams College, and he was a legendary teacher. This has always been my mantra: a teacher, a student and a log. That's all you really need for education to happen.
A plague that will outlive Covid-19
Opinion by Patricia Scotland
Scientists across the world are working around the clock to supply a vaccine that could halt this devastating pandemic. Yet this deadly virus has once again highlighted how we also desperately need a cure for a completely different disease -- one which will sadly outlive Covid-19.
Trump's stunning split with US's military leaders
Opinion by Peter Bergen, CNN National Security Analyst
President Trump loves the pomp of the military. He went to a military-style boarding school in New York, he has always pined for a big Kremlin-style military parade in the streets of Washington DC and when he came into office he appointed retired and serving generals to key positions in his cabinet, to a greater degree than any other modern president.
Three writers who could cost Trump the election
Opinion by Joe Lockhart
From Jeffrey Goldberg's Atlantic article, which alleges that President Donald Trump referred to soldiers who died in battle as "suckers" and "losers" -- a claim Trump denies -- to Michael Cohen's book that paints the President as a bigot, a liar and a fraud, the avalanche of negative news for the President is coming at the worst possible time for him: less than 60 days before Election Day.
The truth about 'herd immunity'
Opinion by Kent Sepkowitz
In the week or so since the White House inner circle added yet another Covid-19 adviser to President Donald Trump, many have become confused about what he thinks the country should do about the pandemic.
Trump is parroting Kremlin line on Navalny poisoning
Opinion by Samantha Vinograd
Let's call a lie a lie. It gets tiresome under President Donald Trump as his inaccurate statements pile up, but it's important that Americans are made aware that the President continues to lie about almost everything. Each new falsehood is unsurprising based on his track record with the truth -- but that doesn't make them any less dangerous. They pose risks to our democracy, including the security of our election in November.
Is Trump-Biden like 1992 -- or 1948?
Opinion by Richard Galant, CNN
Labor Day makes us think of trips to see friends and family, backyard barbecues and a few last, lazy moments of summertime freedom before school and work turn up the pace of life.
What if we don't know who wins on Election Day?
Opinion by Ross Garber
We should be prepared for the likelihood that we won't know who our next president is on Election Day.
The American people deserve to know about Trump's Walter Reed visit
By Jonathan Reiner
Although it's said that Washington, DC, is a city where secrets go to die, the explanation for why President Donald Trump was hurried to a hospital last fall remains a well-guarded mystery.
He used to be a 'hero.' Now he feels hated
Opinion by Thomas Lake
I remember how it felt in March, as the shadow began to fall. Empty shelves at the grocery stores. Sirens wailing in New York. And with the dread came a fleeting glimpse of national unity. We cheered from the balconies as the nurses changed their shifts. In Irvine, California, a medical worker saw a message in chalk from neighbor children: "Thank you so much for what you do." Someone put a sign outside his apartment. It said, "A hero lives here."
How we can contain Covid-19 without a vaccine
Opinion by William Haseltine
While the world is waiting for a safe and effective Covid-19 vaccine, there is a strategy that can potentially bring an end to the pandemic in the United States without the development of pharmaceutical drugs. The strategy, which is cost-effective and compatible with American values like personal freedom, could feasibly bring the epidemic to a halt within two to three months.
Social Security could come to a screeching halt
Opinion by Nancy Altman
Donald Trump once claimed that he could shoot someone in the middle of Fifth Avenue in New York City and not lose any voters. He's now seeing whether the same is true if he kills Social Security.
Trump cannot comprehend true patriotism
Opinion by Frida Ghitis
President Donald Trump may admire the military, but he has shown his contempt for the people who decide to join it and serve the nation -- a decision he seems to find utterly incomprehensible. Americans have heard him disparage war heroes for years, from the late Sen. John McCain to the families of soldiers killed in battle. Americans who sacrifice everything for their country are not heroes in his view, but "losers" and "suckers," according to a new article in The Atlantic, which quotes multiple unnamed sources, including at least one retired four-star general. Trump has vehemently denied the report, but other newsorganizations separately corroborated some of the claims in the piece.
The 'rule' Barr may be willing to bend for Trump
Opinion by Elie Honig
If there was any question before about whether William Barr could be willing to use his power as attorney general to tilt the scales in the upcoming presidential election, there shouldn't be anymore. Barr appeared to confirm as much in his interview with Wolf Blitzer on CNN Wednesday: that he would be willing to breach longstanding Justice Department norms -- that is, the unwritten "60-day rule" -- to advantage the re-election campaign of President Donald Trump.
Why I'm giving $100 million to Black medical schools
Opinion by Michael R. Bloomberg, Wayne A. I. Frederick, David M. Carlisle, Valerie Montgomery Rice and James Hildreth
The Black community has suffered the highest death rates from Covid-19, and the numbers are staggering. Black people are nearly three times more likely than White people to contract the virus, and twice as likely to die from it, according to a report from the National Urban League.
Chadwick Boseman's death and what we must do
Opinion by Fola May
It is harder because it was so sudden. It is harder because it is a disease that I know all too well. It is harder because he was young, gifted and Black. It is harder because our community has already endured so much in this cold and callous year that is 2020.
Retired general: Look for this in your next president
Opinion by Mark Hertling
If you ask people who haven't served in uniform what it takes to be a great military leader, many would say "strength," "toughness" or "courage." People who have served -- and particularly those who have had the honor of commanding -- will tell you there's a lot more to it. Leaders -- military or otherwise -- need character, intellect, vision, humility and will.
Trump's military controversy might save Stars and Stripes
Opinion by SE Cupp
Before a bombshell story in The Atlantic revealed eye-popping allegations that President Donald Trump had referred to America's fallen soldiers as "losers" and "suckers," another story was making its way into the ether without much notice.
Doctors, unshackle our patients
Opinion by Trisha Pasricha
Jacob Blake, the victim of gunshot wounds that left him paralyzed from the waist down, was also shackled to his hospital bed for days. His father pleaded with health care officials and the media to open their eyes to this injustice -- or even to common sense. A man who is paralyzed poses no immediate risk that shackling him to the bed could prevent.
Trump's laughable slam of Nancy Pelosi
Opinion by Jill Filipovic
While President Donald Trump is threatening American democracy, fueling violence and strife, and continuing to make the US an outlier in coronavirus cases and deaths, he and his GOP minions want us to focus on Nancy Pelosi's hair.
Trump's depraved plan to try to win reelection
Opinion by Frida Ghitis
President Donald Trump is right in believing most Americans don't want violence in their streets. But it's America's profound tragedy and grave danger that he, Trump, seems to want more of it.
Who's standing up to Russia on Navalny poisoning? Not America
Opinion by Michael Bociurkiw
With the German government's announcement Wednesday of "unequivocal evidence" that the nerve agent Novichok was used in the poisoning of Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny, we are once again reminded how a vacuum in global leadership -- notably, in this instance, the silence of the American President -- can potentially open the way for the world's strongmen to reach for the deadliest means to silence their critics.
Why you should be a poll worker this year
Opinion by Jonathan Diaz
You've seen them. They check your name and voter registration when you arrive at your polling place, provide you with the correct ballot and hand you an "I Voted" sticker when you're done. They're poll workers: volunteers recruited and trained by county and local election officials to do the tough work of keeping our elections running.
This medical worker used to be a 'hero.' Now he feels hated
Opinion by Thomas Lake
I remember how it felt in March, as the shadow began to fall. Empty shelves at the grocery stores. Sirens wailing in New York. And with the dread came a fleeting glimpse of national unity. We cheered from the balconies as the nurses changed their shifts. In Irvine, California, a medical worker saw a message in chalk from neighbor children: "Thank you so much for what you do." Someone put a sign outside his apartment. It said, "A hero lives here."
The solution in plain sight that states must choose
Opinion by Josh Silver
This year, as a result of the pandemic, we will likely see a dramatic increase in absentee voting, but some states will not verify or count those ballots before Election Day. This delay could be a major problem for American democracy, sowing doubt in the results and distrust in our electoral process.
Ex-police chief: Police shouldn't welcome vigilantes
Opinion by Cedric L. Alexander
A bystander video recorded shortly before the fatal shooting of two people in Kenosha, Wisconsin, shows the accused shooter, Kyle Rittenhouse, with an assault-style rifle, milling among a group of other armed civilians claiming to be standing guard against people gathered to protest the police shooting, two days earlier, of Jacob S. Blake.
Where we need the most diverse team of advisers for US safety
Opinion by Michèle A. Flournoy and Camille Stewart
Joe Biden's selection of Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate is a powerful statement of his commitment to ensuring that all Americans feel part of our democracy -- that government of the people, by the people and for the people applies to all Americans, be they men or women, White or Black, Asian or Latino, gay or straight, recent immigrants or descendants of families who have been here for generations. The Biden-Harris ticket is the first in US history to truly reflect the American people they aspire to serve.
What the Church of Trump is costing America
Opinion by Peniel E. Joseph
How did the President of the United States become one of the nation's largest threats to public health and safety? When one man became head of "church" and state: the Church of Trump, that is.
Robert Redford: Answer this question
Opinion by Robert Redford
I'm not in the habit of quoting lines from movies I've appeared in, but every once in a while, something brings one of those old lines to mind. Recently, I've been thinking of a scene from a film I did in 1972 called "The Candidate."
Esta es la peor herencia política que deja Trump a Biden, según Montaner
El escritor y periodista Carlos Alberto Montaner analiza la herencia política que deja el presidente de Estados Unidos, Donald Trump, al presidente electo Joe Biden. "Estados Unidos necesita, para ejercer de líder del mundo democrático, una total coherencia entre lo que predica y lo que hace", dice Montaner.
La polarización entre Trump y Biden atraería a más votantes a las urnas: una opinión de Carlos Alberto Montaner
Ahora parece que la disyuntiva entre Donald Trump y Joe Biden en las elecciones del 3 de noviembre también atraería a un alto porcentaje del electorado. A dos semanas de los comicios, las impresionantes cifras de la votación anticipada muestran un mayor interés de los votantes en esta opción y en las elecciones en general. Hasta el lunes, los votos anticipados representaban el 20% del total de la votación de 2016, según una encuesta entre funcionarios electorales realizada por CNN, Edison Research y Catalist.
Camilo: ¿Qué le pasa a Trump con ciertas mujeres?
Kamala Harris, la compañera de fórmula de Joe Biden; la primera ministra de Dinamarca, Mette Frederiksen, entre otras mujeres, han sido calificadas por Trump como desagradables. El presentador de CNN Camilo Egaña hace un recuento.
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