Fri, Jun 18th
HOME
ABOUT US
BRANCHES
OUR WORK
COURSES
CAMPUS
CONSULTANCY
EVENTS
SPEAKERS
MULTIMEDIA
PUBLICATIONS
NEWS
Journal of Dialogue Studies, Vol 1 No 1
Download
ISSN: 2054-3131
Autumn 2013, Volume 1, Number 1.
The Journal of Dialogue Studies is a multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed academic journal published twice a year.
Index
AUTUMN 2013, VOLUME 1, NUMBER 1
Overview
Contents
Call for Papers
GENERAL INFORMATION
Aim and Scope
Method
Editorial Team
Editorial Board
Article Submission Guidelines
Journal of Dialogue Studies Style Guide for Contributors
AUTUMN 2013, VOLUME 1, NUMBER 1
Overview
The Journal of Dialogue Studies is a multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed academic journal published twice a year. Its aim is to study the theory and practice of dialogue, understood provisionally as: meaningful interaction and exchange between people (often of different social, cultural, political, religious or professional groups) who come together through various kinds of conversations or activities with a view to increased understanding. The Editors welcome vigorous discussion of this provisional description, of dialogue’s effectiveness as a means of increasing understanding, and of other fundamental questions. The Journal brings together a body of original scholarship on the theory and practice of dialogue that can be critically appraised and debated. It publishes conceptual, research, and/or case-based works on both theory and practice, and papers that discuss wider social, cultural or political issues as these relate to the evaluation of dialogue. In this way, the Journal aims to contribute towards establishing ‘dialogue studies’ as a distinct academic field (or perhaps even emerging discipline).
The first issue is intended to help set the parameters for ‘dialogue studies’. The call for papers raised questions including the following:
What arguments might there be for (or against) developing ‘dialogue studies’ as a distinct academic field (or perhaps even emerging discipline)?
What are the implications of doing so?
How might ‘dialogue studies’ be of use to academics, policy-makers and practitioners?
What do we mean by dialogue, dialogue theories and dialogue practices?
Where along the spectrum of fields is this field best placed?
The Journal is published by the Institute for Dialogue Studies, the academic platform of the Dialogue Society.
Contents
Editorial Introduction..................................................................................................................5
ARTICLES
On Dialogue Studies
Donal Carbaugh​.........................................................................................................................9
Future Directions and Discipline Formation for ‘Dialogue Studies’:
Reflections on Critically Analyzing ‘Dialogue’ in Theory and Practice
Fern Elsdon-Baker​....................................................................................................................29
Studying Dialogue – Some Reflections
Ute Kelly​..................................................................................................................................51
Intergroup Dialogue: a Theoretical Positioning
Michael Atkinson​......................................................................................................................63
Debates and Decisions
Peter Emerson​.........................................................................................................................81
BOOK REVIEWS
Interculturalism: The New Era of Cohesion and Diversity, by Ted Cantle
Reviewed by Omer Sener​.........................................................................................................95
Democracy in Motion: Evaluating the Practice and Impact of DeliberativeCivic Engagement,
edited by Tina Nabatchi, John Gastil, G. MichaelWeiksner and Matt Leighninger
Reviewed by Frances Sleap​......................................................................................................97
Call for Papers
The first issue will be published in Autumn 2013 and focus on 'dialogue studies' as a concept, with particular emphasis on its boundaries, viability and usefulness as an academic field. The Editors invite papers that explore questions such as the following:
What arguments might there be for (or against) developing 'dialogue studies' as a distinct academic field (or perhaps even emerging discipline)?
What are the implications of doing so?
What do we mean by dialogue, dialogue theories and dialogue practices?
How might 'dialogue studies' be of use to academics, policy-makers and practitioners?
Where along the spectrum of fields is this field best placed?
What does the discourse of one or more thinkers, philosophers, activists on dialogue tell us about the viability of a 'dialogue studies'?
Is dialogue valuable in itself and/or by virtue of its outcomes?
How far should the field of 'dialogue studies' extend? Can one field encompass cultural production and intercultural communication?
What might be the implications, if any, of a distinct field in dialogue for peace-building and conflict resolution studies
What can policy-makers learn from dialogue theory or practice that would benefit the development or implementation of policy?
Can/should dialogue be measured or thought of in terms of effectiveness?
Would a distinct field on dialogue focus attention on the instrumental outcomes of dialogue as a practice?
What is the relationship if any between dialogue practices and government policies on multiculturalism, social cohesion, shared values and developing a sense of belonging?
GENERAL INFORMATION
Aim and Scope
The Journal of Dialogue Studies (hereafter 'the Journal' or 'JDS') is a multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed academic journal published twice a year. Its aim is to study the theory and practice of dialogue, understood provisionally as: a meaningful interaction and exchange between individuals and/or people of different groups (social, cultural, political and religious) who come together through various kinds of conversations or activities with a view to increased understanding. Some scholars will want to question that description of dialogue, and others may be sceptical of the effectiveness of dialogue as a mechanism to produce increased understanding. The Editors of course welcome vigorous discussion and debate on these and other fundamental questions.
The Journal will bring together a body of original scholarship on the theory and practice of dialogue that can be critically appraised and debated. It will publish conceptual, research, and/or case-based works on both theory and practice, and papers that discuss wider social, cultural or political issues as these relate to the evaluation of dialogue. In this way, the Journal aims to contribute towards establishing ‘dialogue studies’ as a distinct academic field (or perhaps even emerging discipline). Doing so will be directly useful not only to scholars and students but also to professionals and practitioners working in different contexts at various cultural interfaces.
The Journal is a publication of the Dialogue Society which has been promoting the concept of 'dialogue studies' since its inception by putting forward the notion of dialogue as a form of activity in and of itself while also supporting its development as a distinct field through specific projects like the Masters in Dialogue Studies and its forthcoming Dialogue Theories book (2013).
Method
A concern with the theory or practice of dialogue should be in the foreground of papers that are submitted, but the Editors do not have any preference as regards the general disciplinary background of the work. Indeed contributions will be welcome from a variety of disciplines which may, for example, include sociology, anthropology, cultural studies, linguistics, the study of religion, politics, international relations or law.
Editorial Team
Prof Paul Weller, Academic Editor
Ozcan Keles, Executive Editor
Dr Taptuk Emre Erkoc, Assistant Editor
Dr Omer Faruk Sener, Assistant Editor
Frances Sleap, Assistant Editor
Editorial Board
Prof Michael Barnes, Heythrop College, UK
Prof Joseph Camilleri, La Trobe University, Australia
Prof Donal Carbaugh, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA
Prof Tony Evans, Winchester University, UK
Dr Cem Erbil, Dialogue Society, UK
Prof Max Farrar, Leeds Metropolitan University, UK
Prof Eddie Halpin, Leeds Metropolitan University, UK
Dr Carool Kersten, Kings College, UK
Dr Simon Keyes, St Ethelburga's Centre for Reconciliation and Peace, UK
Prof Ian Linden, Tony Blair Faith Foundation
Dr Karim Murji, Open University, UK
Prof Alpaslan Ozerdem, Coventry University, UK
Prof Ali Paya, University of Westminster, UK
Dr Fabio Petito, University of Sussex, UK
Prof Simon Robinson, Leeds Metropolitan University, UK
Dr Erkan Toguslu, University of KU Leuven, Belgium
Prof Pnina Webner, Keele University, UK
Dr Nicholas Wood, Oxford University, UK
Article Submission Guidelines
Papers should be emailed to journal@dialoguesociety.org
Papers should be in English
Papers submitted to JDS for publication should not be under review with another journal
The first page of the manuscript should contain:
The title
The name(s) and institutional affiliation(s) of the author(s)
The address, telephone, and fax numbers (as well as the e-mail address) of the corresponding author
An abstract of 250 words
A biography of 250 words
6 keywords
Manuscripts should be approximately 4,000 to 8,000 words, excluding bibliography. Longer manuscripts will be considered only in exceptional circumstances.
Articles will be peer reviewed by members of the Editorial Board
Journal of Dialogue Studies Style Guide for Contributors
Manuscripts should be presented in a form and style as set out the Journal's Style Guide below.
  1. Spelling: Use Webster’s Dictionary (11th edition) for questions of spelling.
  2. Page layout: Word standard document page layout, with justified columns. No other format.
  3. Headings: The typescript should be set out in such a way that the heading levels within chapters are immediately apparent. To indicate the different levels of heading and subheading in your manuscript, please use [A] in front of main headings, [B] in front of sub-headings and [C] in front of sub-subheadings if necessary
  4. Font: All text to be in Times New Roman. Main text to be font size 11 pt. Indented quote font size 10.
  5. Emphasis: To emphasis a word or phrase please italicize it in the text. Do not use bold or underline.
  6. Quotes: Quotes of less than three lines should be run on in the text of the paragraph, in 11 point. Quotes of greater than three lines should be in 10 point, one line spaced above and below the quote, and indented with one tab. Use the UK convention for quotes (i.e. single quote marks; double quote marks within the quotation) – e.g. 'The Marxist epithet "The philosophers have interpreted the world, the problem is to change it" remains as apt in the 21st century as it was in the 19th'
  7. Line spacing: Single
  8. Between Paragraphs: Single space
  9. Citations:
    Use the Harvard Style, following the version explained and exemplified below.
    Works should be cited in the text by the name/date system: that is, give the author’s surname, year of publication and, where relevant, the page reference immediately after the material derived from the source, e.g. (Jones 1998, 64). When referring to text spanning more than one page: (Max 1997, 81-83).
    Please include page numbers for journal articles as well as books.
    In the bibliography, for books, please follow this style (punctuation, upper/lower case) exactly: Surname, Initial. Initial. (Date of publication) Title, Place of publication: Press. E.g. Dawkins, R. (1989) The Selfish Gene, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    For journals (again please follow this style exactly): Surname, Initial. Initial. (Date of publication) ‘Title of paper’, Title of Journal, volume number (issue number), x-y.
    See 17 below for further bibliography examples.
  10. Include page reference numbers for all direct citations.
  11. Where there are two or more works by the same author in the same year, they should be distinguished by adding letters: 1997a, 1997b, etc.
  12. When quoting a work by three or more authors, use et al. in the text, but give all the authors’ names in the reference list/bibliography.
  13. Bibliography: Reference and bibliographical lists must always be arranged in alphabetical order by author. Titles of books and journals must be given in italics.
  14. Every work quoted from or mentioned in the text must be included in the reference list/bibliography. Please check that all references are present, and that dates in the text and in the reference list/bibliography are identical.
  15. Bibliography examples:
Books
Colorado, J.A. (2006) Economic theory in the Mexican context: recent developments on the ground, trans. K. Smith, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Makkai, A. and Lockwood, D. G. (1973) Stratificational Linguistics: A Reader, Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.
Pike, K. L. (1967) Language in Relation to a Unified Theory of the Structure of Human Behaviour, revised edn., The Hague: Mouton.
Rajiv Mehrotra (ed.) (2006) Understanding the Dalai Lama, London: Penguin Books.
Chapter in an edited volume:
Veltman, R. (1982) ‘Comparison and intensification: an ideal but problematic domain for systematic functional theory’, in J. Benson and W. Greaves (eds.), Systematic Perspectives on Discourse, Norwood, NJ: Ablex, 15–32.
Journals
Flyvbjerg, B. ‘Habermas and Foucault: Thinkers for Civil Society?’ The British Journal of Sociology, 49 (2), 210-233.
Halliday, M. A. K. (1961) ‘Categories of the theory of grammar’, Word, 17, 241–92.
Lamb, S. M. (1964) ‘The sememic approach to structural semantics’, American Anthropologist, 66 (3, Part 2), 57–78 (reprinted in Pike, 1967).
Conference papers
Published paper:
Gouadec, D. (2001) Training translators: certainties, uncertainties, dilemmas, in B. Maia, J. Haller and M. Ulrych, (eds.) Training the language services provider for the new millennium: proceedings of the III Encontros de Tradução de Astra-FLUP, Universidade do Porto, 17 March. Porto: Universidade do Porto, 31-41.
Paper published online:
Said, M (2006) Reading the World In Fethullah Gulen's Educational Philosophy, Second International Conference on Islam in the Contemporary World: The Fethullah Gülen Movement in Thought and Practice, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas, 4-5 March. Available at: http://www.fethullahgulenconference.org/dallas/read.php?p=reading-world-fethullah-gulen-educational-philosophy (Accessed 26 March 2013).
Unpublished paper:
Scollo, M. (2012) Antiguan contrapuntal conversation in the Bronx, New York. Paper presented at The ethnography of communication: Ways forward, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska, 10-14 June, unpublished.
Internet
Web document:
Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources (2006) Being Prepared for an Influenza Pandemic: a Kit for Small Businesses, Government of Australia. Available at: http://www.innovation.gov.au. (Accessed 28 February 2009).
Webpage:
Byrd, K. (2013) Report on Sufi-Yogi Dialogue. Available at: http://www.sevenpillarshouse.org/article/report_on_sufi-yogi_dialogue/. (Accessed 1 March, 2013).
Dialogos (n.d.) Create inspired futures. Available at: http://dialogos.com/about/overview/ (Accessed 26 March 2013).
(Please use ‘n.d.’ to indicate that no date for the document or webpage is available, both in the in-text citation and in the bibliography.)
NCVO (2013) Budget 2013: NCVO’s Response. Available at: http://www.ncvo-vol.org.uk/news/politics/budget-2013-ncvo’s-response. (Accessed 26 March 2013).
Blog:
Newton, A. (2007) Newcastle toolkit, Angela Newton blog, 16 January. Available at: https://elgg.leeds.ac.uk/libajn/weblog/. (Accessed 23 February 2007).
Newspaper articles
Independent, The (1989) Limits to mutual tolerance (editorial), The Independent, 18 February.
Jones, J. (2013) Life and death in Pompeii and Herculaneum – review, The Guardian, 26 March. Available at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2013/mar/26/life-and-death-pompeii-review. (Accessed 26 March 2013).
Bodies
Institute For Dialogue Studies
Centre For Community Engagement
Connecting Families
Centre For Policy Outreach [Forthcoming]
Top
Copyright © 2019 Dialogue Society  
ContactSupport UsJobs/InternshipsPartners
TwitterFacebookYoutubeLinkedin