Documents
Authors
Tables
Log in
Sign up
MetaCart
DMCA
Donate
Advanced Search
Include Citations
DMCA
The causes of corruption: a cross-national study (2000)
Cached
Download Links
[www.amherst.edu]
[www.policyinnovations.org]
[www.policyinnovations.org]
[www.isr.umich.edu]

Save to List
Add to Collection
Correct Errors
Monitor Changes
by Daniel Treisman
Citations:
397 - 2 self
Summary
Citations
Active Bibliography
Co-citation
Clustered Documents
Version History
BibTeX
@MISC{Treisman00thecauses,
    author = {Daniel Treisman},
    title = { The causes of corruption: a cross-national study},
    year = {2000}
}
Share
OpenURL
 
Abstract
Why is corruption — the misuse of public office for private gain — perceived to be more widespread in some countries than others? Different theories associate this with particular historical and cultural traditions, levels of economic development, political institutions, and government policies. This article analyzes several indexes of ‘perceived corruption’ compiled from business risk surveys for the 1980s and 1990s. Six arguments find support. Countries with Protestant traditions, histories of British rule, more developed economies, and (probably) higher imports were less ‘corrupt’. Federal states were more ‘corrupt’. While the current degree of democracy was not significant, long exposure to democracy predicted
Keyphrases
cross-national study    british rule    private gain    government policy    protestant tradition    political institution    economic development    perceived corruption    public office    different theory    business risk survey    federal state    developed economy    cultural tradition    several index    long exposure    current degree   
Powered by:
About CiteSeerX Submit and Index Documents Privacy Policy Help Data Source Contact Us
Developed at and hosted by The College of Information Sciences and Technology
© 2007-2019 The Pennsylvania State University