ART & ART HISTORY
The Hunt of the Unicorn Tapestries Depict a “Virgin-Capture Legend”
They’re big in elementary school, but unicorn tableaux also have a complex iconographic history that combines religious and secular myths.
Most Recent
PLANTS & ANIMALS
With Climate Change, Poison Ivy May Get Itchier
Bad news for the estimated 80 percent of the human population that's allergic to the dreaded—and abundant—leaves of three.
POLITICS & HISTORY
Catherine de’ Medici Was Good at Chess
The game was a way for early modern women in royal courts to prove their skill in political life.
ROUNDUP
Ten Poems by Audre Lorde
The esteemed poet is author of Sister Outsider, one title on the Schomburg Black Liberation Reading List. Read free related content on JSTOR.
REVEAL DIGITAL COLLECTIONS
Remembering the Human Be-In
More than 20,000 participants in the counterculture gathered in San Francisco’s Golden Gate park to do little more than simply “be” together.
More Stories
Black Radicals
George Washington Williams and the Origins of Anti-Imperialism
Initially supportive of Belgian King Leopold II’s claim to have created a “free state” of Congo, Williams changed his mind when he saw the horrors of empire.
Open Community Collections
The Unicorns of JSTOR
These rare creatures have by turn—and somewhat paradoxically—been associated with purity, fertility, seduction, healing, sacrifice, immortality, and divinity.
Lingua Obscura
How Being Polite with Police Can Backfire
When it comes to interactions with the police, the law favors direct speech. But that's not always the way we're trained to speak to people in power.
Syllabus
Politics and Power in the United States: A Syllabus
Historical and scholarly context for the January 6, 2021 insurrection.
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Trending
POLITICS & HISTORY
The Bayonet: What’s the Point?
According to one scholar, the military sees training in this obsolete weapon as helpful on the modern battlefield.
POLITICS & HISTORY
Library Fires Have Always Been Tragedies. Just Ask Galen.
When Rome burned in 192 CE, the city's vibrant community of scholars was devastated. The physician Galen described the scale of the loss.
EDUCATION & SOCIETY
Herbs & Verbs: How to Do Witchcraft for Real
Like for real real.
Long Reads
ARTS & CULTURE
Venn Diagram of LGBTQ+ and Gaming Communities Goes Here
Video games offer many LGBTQ+ people avenues for meaning, community, and escape, but in-game cultures of harassment still pose serious problems.
POLITICS & HISTORY
How LGBTQ+ Activists Got “Homosexuality” out of the DSM
The first DSM, created in 1952, established a hierarchy of sexual deviancies, vaulting heterosexual behavior to an idealized place in American culture.
EDUCATION & SOCIETY
The Truth about Lying
You can’t spot a liar just by looking, but psychologists are zeroing in on methods that might actually work.
POLITICS & GOVERNMENT
The Feminist History of “Child Allowances”
The Biden administration’s proposed “child allowances” draw on the feminist thought of Crystal Eastman, who advocated “motherhood endowments” 100 years ago.
Editors' Picks
ARTS & CULTURE
“No Duty But That to Herself”: American Girls in Paris
The American GIrls' club was created not only to feed and house American girls in Paris in the 1890s
POLITICS & HISTORY
How American Girl Scouts Shocked Mexico in the 1950s
At a retreat center called Our Cabaña, girls from all over the world became Cold War–era diplomats. American scouts had additional ideas.
POLITICS & HISTORY
Defying the Gender Binary in the 1930s
In the 1930s, experimental psychologist Agnes Landis interviewed women who identified as "tomboys."
POLITICS & HISTORY
Girls and Dolls in the Roman Empire
Analyzing the dolls of elite girls shows that playthings reinforced gendered expectations but also allowed for imaginative play.
EDUCATION & SOCIETY
How American Girl Dolls Teach History (And Revolution)
Can purchasing a doll be a revolutionary act? The franchise makes an effort to connect its characters with the realities of American history.
Film & Media
Hollywood Goes to Its First Lesbian Bar and Can’t Stop Staring
The Killing of Sister George was the first Hollywood movie to depict a lesbian bar. Director Robert Aldrich was obsessed with its authenticity.
Venn Diagram of LGBTQ+ and Gaming Communities Goes Here
Video games offer many LGBTQ+ people avenues for meaning, community, and escape, but in-game cultures of harassment still pose serious problems.
Black Camerawoman Jessie Maple’s Fight to Join a Union
Her climb into filmmaking began with programs designed to train African Americans. But to succeed, she needed to break into a mostly white male union.
Open Community Collections on JSTOR
Remembering the Human Be-In
More than 20,000 participants in the counterculture gathered in San Francisco’s Golden Gate park to do little more than simply “be” together.
The East Village Other
The East Village Other, a countercultural newspaper founded in 1965, published interviews with Timothy Leary and Allen Ginsberg.
Fall in Love with Fabric Samples
Donald Brothers was a storied Scottish firm that produced amazing fabric designs. Feast your eyes on a selection today.
Columns
Joanna Koerten’s Scissor-Cut Works Were Compared to Michelangelo
And then, snip by snip, she was cut out of the frame of Renaissance art history.
The “Deviant” African Genders That Colonialism Condemned
European travellers and anthropologists found that their gendered worldview didn’t easily map onto the societies they encountered.
When Paid Applauders Ruled the Paris Opera House
Professional applauders, collectively known as the “claque,” helped mold the tastes of an uncertain audience.
Audio Stories
Why Are So Many Romances Set in the Regency Period?
The British Regency era lasted less than a decade, but it spawned a staggering number of unlikely fictional marriages.
The Self-Styled Sci-Fi Supermen of the 1940s
Way before there were stans, there were slans. Too bad about their fascist utopian daydreams!
A Brief History of the Women’s KKK
The Women’s KKK, an affiliated-but-separate racist organization for white Protestant women, courted members through an insincere “empowerment feminism.”
Our Cabaña was depicted “as an exotic, transformative place that collapsed girls’ cultural differences.”
How American Girl Scouts Shocked Mexico in the 1950s
Pedagogies
Teaching U.S. History with JSTOR Daily
A survey course may be the only college-level history course a student takes. Here's an easy way to incorporate fascinating scholarship.
How to Use Zotero and Scrivener for Research-Driven Writing
This month, I’m doing something a little different with my column: I’m sharing the system I use to write it, so that you can use or adapt my system.
Are Students Just Telling Us What We Want to Hear?
Students tend to fill out end-of-year evaluations so as to describe a “narrative of progress.” For teachers, this is fast food of the mind.
Roundtable
Sigmund Freud’s The Ego and the Id
Freud died 80 years ago this week. In this "Virtual Roundtable," three scholars debate the legacy of his 1923 text.
What Makes a Fair College Admissions Process?
In the wake of the college admissions scandal, scholars go back to the drawing board to answer this most central question.
Public Policy at the Limits of Science
Stefan Böschen and Kevin C. Elliot discuss how science is often misused by policy-makers, adversely affecting public awareness and disciplinary credibility.
Education
This Forgotten Female Orator Broke Boundaries for Women
At a time when respectable women rarely spoke to the public, Anne Laura Clarke was a star lecturer.
Kids’ Games in South Africa
Formal education in language and music is important for children, but as one scholar found, so is their own play involving gesture, slang, and pop songs.
JSTOR Companion to the Schomburg Center’s Black Liberation Reading List
JSTOR has created an open library to support readers seeking to engage with BIPOC+Q-authored reading lists like the one developed by the New York Public Library.
Performing Arts
Out of Black Liberation, Asian American Jazz
Inspired by Black artistic and political movements, musicians from diverse communities began expressing pan-Asian cultural belonging and freedom.
How Tribute Bands Celebrate Music History
They're not just cheese! For some people, seeing a band play note-for-note covers of classic songs goes beyond nostalgia.
How a Fake Supergroup Mocked the Real Thing
The Masked Marauders were the cockamamie creation of a bored rock critic. They still sold 100,000 albums.
Science & Technology
With Climate Change, Poison Ivy May Get Itchier
Bad news for the estimated 80 percent of the human population that's allergic to the dreaded—and abundant—leaves of three.
How Tree Ring Records Can Help Predict Droughts
Inside the trunks of trees lies a wealth of data on climate that goes back generations.
The Greenhouse Gas That’s More Potent Than Carbon Dioxide
Emitting just 1 ton of nitrous oxide—a common ingredient in synthetic fertilizer—is roughly equivalent to emitting 300 tons of carbon dioxide.
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