Skip to Main Content
AdvertisementNavbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Search
Close
search filter search input Search
Advanced Search
Search Menu
Skip Nav Destination


Article Navigation
Volume 15
Issue 1
March 2013
What Best Explains Successful Protest Cascades? ICTs and the Fuzzy Causes of the Arab Spring
Muzammil M. Hussain,
Muzammil M. Hussain
University of Michigan
Search for other works by this author on:
Oxford Academic
Google Scholar
Philip N. Howard
Philip N. Howard
Princeton University
Search for other works by this author on:
Oxford Academic
Google Scholar
International Studies Review, Volume 15, Issue 1, March 2013, Pages 48–66, https://doi.org/10.1111/misr.12020
Published:
10 April 2013Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term SearchClose
search filter search input Search
Advanced Search
Search Menu
Abstract
It has been 15 years since the last wave of democratization. But as a region, North Africa and the Middle East were noticeably devoid of popular democracy movements—until the early months of 2011. Democratization movements had existed long before technologies like mobile phones and the Internet came to these countries. But with these technologies, people sharing an interest in democracy built extensive networks and activated collective action movements for political change. What might have made regimes more susceptible than others to these uprisings, and what might explain the relative successes of some movements over others? What role does information technology have in the modern recipe for democratization? Weighing multiple political, economic, demographic, and cultural conditions, we find that information infrastructure—especially mobile phone use—consistently appears as one of the key ingredients in parsimonious models for the conjoined combinations of causes behind regime fragility and social movement success. To understand the successes and failures of contemporary political protests, we must also assess how civil society leaders and authoritarian security forces treat communication technologies as democratically consequential.
© 2013 International Studies Association

Issue Section:
Articles
You do not currently have access to this article.
Download all slides
Sign in
Don't already have an Oxford Academic account? Register
You could not be signed in. Please check your email address / username and password and try again.
Oxford Academic account
Email address / Username ?
Password

Forgot password?
Don't have an account?
HPC
Email address / username
Most users should sign in with their email address. If you originally registered with a username please use that to sign in.
Close
International Studies Association members
Sign in via society site
Sign in via your Institution
Sign in
Purchase
Subscription prices and ordering
Short-term Access
To purchase short term access, please sign in to your Oxford Academic account above.
Don't already have an Oxford Academic account? Register
What Best Explains Successful Protest Cascades? ICTs and the Fuzzy Causes of the Arab Spring - 24 Hours access
EUR €27.00
GBP £20.00
USD $35.00
Rental

This article is also available for rental through DeepDyve.
Advertisement
2,377 Views
85 Citations
View Metrics
×
Email alerts
Article activity alert
Advance article alerts
New issue alert
Receive exclusive offers and updates from Oxford Academic
Related articles in
Citing articles via
Web of Science (85)
Google Scholar
Crossref
Pragmatism in IR: The Prospects for Substantive Theorizing
Forum: Thinking Theoretically in Unsettled Times: COVID-19 and Beyond
The Rankings Game: A Relational Approach to Country Performance Indicators
Insulating Peace: Managerial Coordination in Durable Security Complexes
Leader Influence in Role Selection Choices: Fulfilling Role Theory's Potential for Foreign Policy Analysis
Advertisement
Advertisement
Connect
Resources
Explore
Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide
Close
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account
Close
This PDF is available to Subscribers Only
View Article Abstract & Purchase Options
For full access to this pdf, sign in to an existing account, or purchase an annual subscription.
Close
IssuesAdvance articlesSubmitAuthor GuidelinesSubmission SiteOpen AccessPurchaseAlertsAboutAbout International Studies ReviewAbout the International Studies AssociationEditorial BoardAdvertising and Corporate ServicesJournals Career NetworkSelf-Archiving PolicyDispatch DatesISA Portal