El-Ghad Party - Wikipedia
El-Ghad Party
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This article is about the official El-Ghad party led by Moussa Moustafa Moussa. For the El-Ghad party split led by Ayman Nour, see Ghad El-Thawra Party.
"Tomorrow Party" redirects here. For the Japanese Political Party, see Tomorrow Party of Japan.
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The el-Ghad Party (Arabic: حزب الغد‎‎ Ḥizb el-Ghad, IPA: [ˈħezb elˈɣæd]; "The Tomorrow Party") is an active political party in Egypt that was granted license in October 2004. El-Ghad is a centrist liberal secular political party pressing for widening the scope of political participation and for a peaceful rotation of power.
el-Ghad Party
Hizb el-Ghad
حزب الغد
ChairpersonMoussa Mostafa Moussa
FoundersAyman Nour and Wael Nawara
Founded2001
HeadquartersCairo, Egypt
NewspaperEl-Ghad
IdeologySecularism
Liberalism
Liberal democracy
Reformism
Political positionCentre
National affiliationEgyptian Front[1]
SloganHand in Hand, we build tomorrow
House of Representatives0 / 568
Website
www.elghad.com
The official El-Ghad Party, headed by Moussa Moustafa Moussa, was running the 2011–12 Egyptian parliamentary election as an independent list. The split faction Ghad El-Thawra Party, headed by Ayman Nour, was part of the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party-led Democratic Alliance for Egypt.[2]
Background
Ayman Nour left the New Wafd Party in 2001, and established El-Ghad. The party was legalized in 2004. After facing president Hosni Mubarak in the 2005 Egyptian presidential election, Nour was sentenced to five years in jail on forgery charges.[2]
In 2005, just before Nour being sentenced, the El-Ghad party split in two factions. One was headed by Moussa Moustafa Moussa, the other by Nour's (now former) wife Gameela Ismail.[2] Legal battle ensued between both factions, both claiming legitimacy and simultaneously using the party name and insignia. The final court ruling in May 2011 was in favor of Moussa.[3] Ayman Nour hence filed for a new party, Ghad El-Thawra Party or "Revolution's Tomorrow Party", which was approved on 9 October 2011.[2]
The removal of Nour from the party leadership by Moussa, and the latter's election to the Egyptian Upper House, have been seen as compliances with the Hosni Mubarak regime.[2]
Platform
The party platform calls for:
Name confusion
Ayman Nour has been tightly associated with both the El-Ghad name and party, even being accused of internal monopoly by other party members.[2] Since both Nour and Moussa factions were using (and still are) the same name and insignia (ex: Ghad El-Thawra website[4]), it was often difficult to tell them apart. For instance, Liberal International listed El-Ghad, specifying its leader as Ayman Nour, as an observer member.[5] Many poll and media outlets used the term "El-Ghad" without specifying which party or faction they are referring to,[6] although they often meant the Ayman Nour Ghad El-Thawra faction.[7][8]
See also
References
  1. ^ ""الغد" يدفع بـ 8 مرشحين على قائمة "الجبهة المصرية"". El Balad. 9 September 2015. Retrieved 9 September 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Ghad Al-Thawra Party". ahram.org. 3 December 2011. Retrieved 16 December 2013.
  3. ^ محمود حسين، "شئون الأحزاب" ترفض قبول تأسيس حزب الغد الجديد Archived 2013-12-17 at the Wayback Machine. اليوم السابع 2011-9-5. وصل لهذا المسار في 28 سبتمبر 2011.
  4. ^ "aymannour.net".
  5. ^ Datasheet on the Liberal International's website Archived 2011-05-22 at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ "Egypt's Simmering Rage". The Daily Beast. 26 July 2011. Retrieved 16 December 2013.
  7. ^ "2nd National Voter Survey in Egypt"(PDF). Danish-Egyptian Dialogue Institute (DEDI). Retrieved October 13, 2011.[dead link]
  8. ^ "3rd National Voter Survey in Egypt"(PDF). Danish-Egyptian Dialogue Institute (DEDI). Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 August 2013. Retrieved 16 December 2013.
External links
Last edited on 27 April 2021, at 02:46
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