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Becoming Batman
Becoming Batman: The Possibility of a Superhero is a 2008 science book by neuroscience professor E. Paul Zehr.[1] The book was first published on November 7, 2008 through Johns Hopkins University Press and covers how much an ordinary person would need to train and adapt to become Batman. Becoming Batman is unique in its explicit analysis of whether or not it is actually possible for a human being to achieve Batman status through training.[2]
Becoming Batman: The Possibility of a Superhero
AuthorE. Paul Zehr
CountryCanada
LanguageEnglish
SubjectPhysiology and Superhero comics
GenreNon-fiction
PublisherJohns Hopkins University Press
Publication date
2008
Media typePrint (Hardcover)
Pages300
ISBN978-0-8018-9063-5
OCLC213408580
613.7 22
LC ClassPN6728.B363 Z45 2008
Synopsis
In the book Zehr goes over the amount of physical training that would be necessary for someone to become Batman. Zehr draws upon his knowledge as a neuroscientist, kinesiologist, and martial artist to do this, and covers topics such as what it would be like to fight in a superhero uniform as well as what a person's daily dietary requirements would be. Becoming Batman is unique in its explicit analysis of whether or not it is actually possible for a human being to achieve Batman status through training.[3]
Reception
The Guardian gave a mostly positive review for Becoming Batman, remarking that Zehr's "[4] grasp of Chinese martial arts is somewhat loose, but the physiological material is fascinating and well explained." Publishers Weekly also gave a positive review, remarking that the book would have an obvious appeal to fans of Batman.[5]
Broader Impact
Zehr’s work has also had a reciprocal impact on the way the comics are viewed and even written, providing reference material regarding the “physical reality of Batman” as recognized by Scottish Batman, Incorporated writer Grant Morrison.[6] More recently, because of Becoming Batman, media articles discussing Batman and the DC Universe have included commentary by Zehr as a relevant authority,[7] or referred to ideas from his book, weaving his scientific perspective into the Batman conversation.[8]
References
  1. ^ "Becoming Batman May Not Be As Crazy As It Sounds". US News. Retrieved 30 January 2014.
  2. ^ "Dark Knight Shift: Why Batman Could Exist--But Not for Long". Scientific American. Retrieved 30 January 2014.
  3. ^ "Could A Mere Mortal Really Be Batman?". NPR. Retrieved 30 January 2014.
  4. ^ Poole, Steven. "Becoming Batman (review)". The Guardian. Retrieved 30 January 2014.
  5. ^ "Becoming Batman (review)". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved 30 January 2014.
  6. ^ "Grant Morrison Discusses 'Batman Inc,' Lord Death Man, and the Alan Moore Interview". Comics Alliance. Archived from the original on 27 July 2014. Retrieved 14 May 2014.
  7. ^ "What a Hero: Batman's in Great Nick for a 75-Year-Old". The Irish Times. Retrieved 14 May 2014.
  8. ^ "Batman: From Midnight Monster to Pop-Tacular Star. Kapow!". The Spectator. Retrieved 14 May 2014.
External links

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Last edited on 30 March 2021, at 05:04
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