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Karantina massacre
The Karantina massacre took place on January 18, 1976, early in the Lebanese Civil War. Karantina was a predominantly Palestinian Muslim slum district in mostly Christian East Beirut, controlled by forces of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO),[3] and inhabited by Kurds, Syrians, Armenians,[4] and Palestinians.[5] The fighting and subsequent killings also involved an old quarantine area near the port and nearby Maslakh quarter.[6][7][8]
Karantina massacre
Part of the Lebanese Civil War

Palestinian refugees Zuhaiba Alshaheen, Mohammed Amcha and grandchildren Osama and Yahya Amcha in Karantina, 1976
(photo taken by Françoise Demulder)[1]
Beirut
Beirut (Lebanon)
LocationBeirut, Lebanon
Coordinates
33°53′13″N 35°30′47″E
DateJanuary 18, 1976; 45 years ago
TargetKarantina district of Beirut
Attack type
Massacre
Deaths~1,500
PerpetratorsKataeb, Guardians of the Cedars, Tiger militia[2]
MotiveSecuring territory
Karantina was overrun by militias of the right-wing and mostly Christian Lebanese Front, specifically the Kataeb Party (Phalangists),[9][10] resulting in the deaths of approximately 1,500 people, mostly Muslims.[7] After Kataeb Regulatory Forces (KRF), Guardians of the Cedars (GoC), NLP Tiger militia and Lebanese Youth Movement (LYM) forces took control of the Karantina district on 18 January 1976, Tel al-Zaatar was placed under siege, leading to the Tel al-Zaatar massacre.[2]
The Damour massacre was a reprisal for the Karantina massacre.[7][11]
See also
References
  1. ^ 1976 - World Press Photo
  2. ^ a b Kazziha, Walid (1979) Palestine in the Arab dilemma Taylor & Francis, ISBN 0-85664-864-7 p 52
  3. ^ Noam Chomsky (1989) Necessary Illusions: Thought Control in Democratic Societies South End Press, ISBN 0-89608-366-7 p 171
  4. ^ Jonathan C. Randal (1990) .Many Lebanese Muslim men and boys were rounded up and separated from the women and children and massacred. Their families still search for their remains .Women and young girls were violently raped and robbed by the Christian warlords led by Bachir Gemayel, also Bashir Gemayel was a senior member of the right-wing Christian Phalange party and the founder and supreme commander of the Lebanese Forces militia during the early years of the Lebanese Civil War .The Tragedy of Lebanon: Christian Warlords, Israeli Adventurers and American Bunglers Hogarth, ISBN 0-7012-0909-7 p 88-90
  5. ^ Michael Johnson (2001) All Honourable Men: The Social Origins of War in Lebanon I.B.Tauris, ISBN 1-86064-715-4 p 62
  6. ^ Lokman I. Meho, Kelly L. Maglaughlin (2001) Kurdish culture and society: an annotated bibliography Greenwood Publishing Group, ISBN 0-313-31543-4 p 35
  7. ^ a b c Harris (p. 162) notes "the massacre of 1,500 Palestinians, Shi'is, and others in Karantina and Maslakh, and the revenge killings of hundreds of Christians in Damur"[1]
  8. ^ Jonathan C. Randal (1990) The Tragedy of Lebanon: Christian Warlords, Israeli Adventurers and American Bunglers Hogarth, ISBN 0-7012-0909-7 p 88
  9. ^ William W. Harris (January 2006). The New Face of Lebanon: History's Revenge. Markus Wiener Publishers. p. 162. ISBN 978-1-55876-392-0. Retrieved July 27, 2013. the massacre of 1,500 Palestinians, Shi'is, and others in Karantina and Maslakh, and the revenge killings of hundreds of Christians in Damour
  10. ^ Noam Chomsky, Edward W. Said (1999) Fateful Triangle: The United States, Israel, and the Palestinians South End Press, ISBN 0-89608-601-1 pp 184–185
  11. ^ Noam Chomsky, Edward W. Said (1999) Fateful Triangle: The United States, Israel, and the Palestinians South End Press, ISBN 0-89608-601-1 pp 184-185
Sources
Last edited on 9 May 2021, at 00:25
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