Open vowel - Wikipedia
Open vowel
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IPA: Vowels
FrontCentralBack
Close
iy
ɨʉ
ɯu
Near-close
ɪʏ
Close-mid
eø
ɘɵ
ɤo
Mid
ø̞
ɤ̞
Open-mid
ɛœ
ɜɞ
ʌɔ
Near-open
Open
aɶ
ɑɒ
Vowels beside dots are: unrounded  rounded
This article contains phonetic transcriptions in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA. For the distinction between [ ], / / and ⟨ ⟩, see IPA § Brackets and transcription delimiters.
An open vowel is a vowel sound in which the tongue is positioned as far as possible from the roof of the mouth. Open vowels are sometimes also called low vowels (in U.S. terminology [1]) in reference to the low position of the tongue.
In the context of the phonology of any particular language, a low vowel can be any vowel that is more open than a mid vowel. That is, open-mid vowels, near-open vowels, and open vowels can all be considered low vowels.
Partial list
The open vowels with dedicated symbols in the International Phonetic Alphabet are:
There also are central vowels that do not have dedicated symbols in the IPA:
There is no unambiguous way of transcribing the open central vowels (but see obsolete/nonstandard IPA ). The diaeresis indicates centralization, so ⟨ä⟩ could mean near-front and ⟨ɒ̈⟩ could mean near-back. However, in practice the diaeresis is assumed to mean central, while ⟨a̠⟩ and ⟨ɒ̟⟩ are used for the front and back articulations, respectively.
The extremely rare contrast between open front, central and back unrounded vowels has been reported to occur in the Hamont-Achel dialect of Limburgish, which features long versions of these sounds, as well as short versions of the open front and back vowels. The short versions do not contrast directly with the open central vowel, which can only be long.[3]
See also
Close vowel
References
  1. ^ "VOWEL QUALITY". Oxford University Press. Retrieved 20 April 2017.
  2. ^ This vowel is not known to occur as a phoneme distinct from /œ/ in any language.
  3. ^ Verhoeven (2007), p. 221.
Bibliography
Verhoeven, Jo (2007), "The Belgian Limburg dialect of Hamont", Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 37 (2): 219–225, doi​:​10.1017/S0025100307002940
Last edited on 9 March 2021, at 12:35
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