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Passaic County, New Jersey
Passaic County (/
pəˈseɪ.ɪk
/ pə-SAY-ik) is a county in the U.S. state of New Jersey that is part of the New York metropolitan area.
Passaic County
County

Flag
Seal

Location within the U.S. state of New Jersey

New Jersey's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 41.03°N 74.30°W
Country United States
State
 New Jersey
FoundedFebruary 7, 1837[1]
Named for"Pasaeck", a Lenape word meaning "valley"
SeatPaterson[2]
Largest cityPaterson (population)
West Milford (area)
Government
 • Freeholder directorJohn W. Bartlett (D, term ends December 31, 2019)
Area
 • Total197.10 sq mi (510.5 km2)
 • Land184.59 sq mi (478.1 km2)
 • Water12.51 sq mi (32.4 km2)  6.35%
Population (2010)
 • Total501,226
 • Estimate (2019)501,826
 • Density2,500/sq mi (980/km2)
Congressional districts5th, 9th, 11th
Website
www​.passaiccountynj​.org
Interactive map of Passaic County, New Jersey
Bergen and Passaic counties, 1872
As of the 2010 census, the population was 501,226,[3] an increase of 12,177 (+2.5%) from the 489,049 counted in the 2000 Census,[4][5][6] As of the 2019 Census estimate, the county's population was 501,826, making it the state's ninth-most populous county,[7][8][9] and marking an increase of 2.3% from 2010.[3] Its county seat is Paterson.[2] The most populous place was Paterson, with 146,199 residents at the time of the 2010 Census, more than 29% of the county's population, while West Milford covered 80.32 square miles (208.0 km2), the largest total area of any municipality and more than 40% of the county's area.[6]
Passaic County was created on February 7, 1837, from portions of Bergen County and Essex County.[1]
Geography
The landscape of Passaic County, near the north edge of New Jersey, spans some hilly areas and has dozens of lakes. The county covers a region about 30 × 20 miles wide (48 × 32 km). The region is split by major roads, including portions of Interstate 287 and I-80, near Paterson (see map at left). The Garden State Parkway (GSP) cuts across the southern end, near Clifton. The Passaic River winds northeast past Totowa into Paterson, where the river then turns south to Passaic town, on the way to Newark, further south.
The highest point is any one of six areas on Bearfort Ridge in West Milford at approximately 1,480 feet (450 m) above sea level.[10] The lowest elevation is approximately 20 feet (6.1 m) along the Passaic River in Clifton.[citation needed]
The southeastern, more populous half of the county is either flat near the river or mildly hilly. The northwestern section is rugged and mountainous.
According to the 2010 Census, the county had a total area of 197.10 square miles (510.5 km2), including 184.59 square miles (478.1 km2) of land (93.7%) and 12.51 square miles (32.4 km2) of water (6.35%).[6][11]
Climate and weather
Paterson, New Jersey
Climate chart (explanation)
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
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3.8
 
 
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4.3
 
 
64
42
 
 
4
 
 
54
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43
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Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[12]
Metric conversion
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
89
 
 
3
−7
 
 
71
 
 
5
−6
 
 
104
 
 
10
−1
 
 
109
 
 
17
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18
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12
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102
 
 
6
−4
Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation totals in mm
In recent years, average temperatures in the county seat of Paterson have ranged from a low of 19 °F (−7 °C) in January to a high of 86 °F (30 °C) in July, although a record low of −11 °F (−24 °C) was recorded in January 1961 and a record high of 105 °F (41 °C) was recorded in September 1953. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.86 inches (73 mm) in February to 4.78 inches (121 mm) in September.[12] The county has a humid continental climate which is hot-summer (Dfa) except in higher areas to the north where it is warm-summer (Dfb).
Demographics
Historical population
CensusPop.
184016,734
185022,56934.9%
186029,01328.6%
187046,41660.0%
188068,86048.4%
1890105,04652.6%
1900155,20247.7%
1910215,90239.1%
1920259,17420.0%
1930302,12916.6%
1940309,3532.4%
1950337,0939.0%
1960406,61820.6%
1970460,78213.3%
1980447,585−2.9%
1990453,0601.2%
2000489,0497.9%
2010501,2262.5%
2019 (est.)501,826[13]0.1%
Historical sources: 1790-1990[14]
1970-2010[6] 2000[4] 2010[3] 2000-2010[15]
2010-2019
2010 Census
The 2010 United States census counted 501,226 people, 166,785 households, and 120,919 families in the county. The population density was 2,715.3 per square mile (1,048.4/km2). There were 175,966 housing units at an average density of 953.3 per square mile (368.1/km2). The racial makeup was 62.65% (314,001) White, 12.83% (64,295) Black or African American, 0.67% (3,348) Native American, 5.01% (25,092) Asian, 0.03% (156) Pacific Islander, 15.11% (75,735) from other races, and 3.71% (18,599) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 37.04% (185,677) of the population.[3]
Of the 166,785 households, 34.5% had children under the age of 18; 48.7% were married couples living together; 17.5% had a female householder with no husband present and 27.5% were non-families. Of all households, 22.6% were made up of individuals and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.94 and the average family size was 3.45.[3]
24.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 25.7% from 45 to 64, and 12% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.1 years. For every 100 females, the population had 94.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 91.1 males.[3]
Same-sex couples headed one in 149 households in 2010.[16]
2000 Census
As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 489,049 people, 163,856 households, and 119,614 families residing in the county. The population density was 2,639 people per square mile (1,019/km2). There were 170,048 housing units at an average density of 918 per square mile (354/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 62.32% White, 13.22% Black or African American, 0.44% Native American, 3.69% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 16.24% from other races, and 4.05% from two or more races. 29.95% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[4][18] Among those who reported their ancestry, 16.6% were of Italian, 9.5% Irish, 8.1% German and 6.2% Polish ancestry according to Census 2000.[18][19]
There were 163,856 households, out of which 35.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.50% were married couples living together, 16.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.00% were non-families. 22.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.42.[4]
In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.10% under the age of 18, 9.30% from 18 to 24, 31.30% from 25 to 44, 21.30% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.80 males.[4]
The median income for a household in the county was $49,210, and the median income for a family was $56,054. Males had a median income of $38,740 versus $29,954 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,370. About 9.40% of families and 12.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.30% of those under age 18 and 9.20% of those age 65 or over.[18][20]
Law, government, policing
The Passaic County Court House and Administrative Building complex (center) for Passaic County is located in Downtown Paterson.
The Passaic County Court House and Administrative Building complex is located at the county seat in Paterson.[21]
In Passaic County's commission form of government, the Board of Chosen Freeholders discharge both executive and legislative responsibilities. Seven Freeholders are elected at-large for three-year terms on a staggered basis. A Freeholder Director and Freeholder Deputy Director are elected from among the seven Freeholders at an annual reorganization meeting in January.[22] Passaic County operates through six standing committees of the Board of Chosen Freeholders. They are Administration & Finance; Health, Education and Community Affairs; Public Works and Buildings & Grounds; Law & Public Safety; Human Services and Planning and Economic Development. The Freeholders also appoint individuals to departments, agencies, boards and commissions for the effective administration of county government. In 2016, freeholders were paid $28,500 and the freeholder director was paid an annual salary of $29,500.[23] The Freeholders select a County Administrator who, in the role of chief administrative officer, supervises the day-to-day operation of county government and its departments; Anthony J. DeNova III is the County Administrator.[24]
As of 2019, Passaic County's Freeholders are:[25][26][27]
Pursuant to Article VII Section II of the New Jersey State Constitution, each county in New Jersey is required to have three elected administrative officials known as "constitutional officers." These officers are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[28] Constitutional officers. elected on a countywide basis are:[27]
The Passaic County Prosecutor is Camelia M. Valdes of Bloomingdale, who was nominated by Governor of New Jersey Jon S. Corzine in May 2009 and renominated by Governor Chris Christie in June 2015.[36][37]
Passaic County constitutes Vicinage 11 of the New Jersey Superior Court and is seated at the Passaic County Courthouse in Paterson; the Assignment Judge for Vicinage 11 is Ernest M. Caposela.[38] Law enforcement at the county level is provided by the Passaic County Sheriff and the Passaic County Prosecutor's Office.
Federal Representatives
Three federal Congressional Districts cover the county, with most of the northern portion of the county in the 5th District, most of the southern portion of the county in the 9th District and the central portion of the county in the 11th District.[39][40] For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Josh Gottheimer (D, Wyckoff).[41][42] For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson).[43][44] For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Mikie Sherrill (D, Montclair).[45]
State Representatives
The 16 municipalities of Passaic County are represented by seven separate legislative districts[46]
DistrictSenator[47]Assembly[47]Municipalities
26thJoseph Pennacchio(R)BettyLou Decrose (R)
West Millford (26,856).
The remainder of this district covers portions of Essex County and Morris County.
34thNia Gill (D)Thomas P. Giblin (D)
Clifton (86,607). The remainder of this district covers portions of Essex County
35thNellie Pou (D)Shavonda E. Sumter (D)
Haledon (8,463), North Haledon (8,570), Paterson (148,678) and Prospect Park (5,964).
The remainder of this district covers portions of Bergen County.
38thJoseph Lagana (D)Lisa Swain (D)
Hawthorne (19,101). The remainder of this district covers portions of Bergen County.
36thPaul Sarlo (D)Gary Schaer (D)
Passaic (71,247). The remainder of this district covers portions of Bergen County.
39thHolly Schepisi (R)Robert Auth (R)
Bloomingdale (8,242), Ringwood (12,454) and Wanaque (1,994).
The remainder of this district covers portions of Bergen County.
40thKristin Corrado (R)Kevin J. Rooney (R)
Little Falls (14,502), Pompton Lakes (11,206), Totowa (10,817), Wayne (55,072) and
Woodland Park (12,834). The remainder of this district includes portions of Bergen County,
Essex County & Morris County.
Highlands protection
In 2004, the New Jersey Legislature passed the Highlands Water Protection and Planning Act, which regulates the New Jersey Highlands region. The northwestern area of the county, comprising the municipalities of Bloomingdale, Pompton Lakes, Ringwood, Wanaque and West Milford, was included in the highlands preservation area and is subject to the rules of the act and the Highlands Water Protection and Planning Council, a division of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.[48] Some of the territory in the protected region is classified as being in the highlands preservation area, and thus subject to additional rules.[49]
Policing
The Passaic County sheriff's department provides law enforcement functions throughout entire Passaic County plus unincorporated county area police patrol, detective, crime scene investigation, SWAT, K-9 function, operation of the Passaic County Jail, and the security of all county-owned facilities, including the Passaic County Courthouse/Administration Complex. The incorporated cities within the county: Paterson, Passaic City, Clifton, Bloomingdale, Pompton Lakes, Prospect Park have separate municipal police departments.
Politics
As of August 1, 2020, there were a total of 318,029 registered voters in Passaic County, of which 128,114 (40.3%) were registered as Democrats, 64,389 (20.3%) were registered as Republicans and 120,282 (37.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5,244 (1.7%) voters registered to other parties.[50]Among the county's 2010 Census population, 53.2% (vs. 53.2% in Passaic County) were registered to vote, including 70.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.8% countywide).[51][52]
In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 58.8% of the vote here (113,257 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 37.7% (72,552 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (1,586 votes), among the 192,558 ballots cast by the county's 273,483 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.4%.[53] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 53.9% of the vote here (94,962 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 42.7% (75,200 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (1,149 votes), among the 176,303 ballots cast by the county's 254,569 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 69.3.[54]
Presidential election results
Presidential election results[55]
YearRepublicanDemocraticThird parties
202041.0% 92,00957.5% 129,0971.4% 3,224
201637.2% 72,90259.5% 116,7593.4% 6,567
201235.4% 64,52363.6% 115,9261.0% 1,765
200838.7% 72,55260.3% 113,2571.0% 1,904
200443.9% 75,20055.4% 94,9620.7% 1,149
200039.0% 61,04357.7% 90,3243.3% 5,206
199635.0% 53,59456.2% 85,8798.8% 13,478
199243.2% 71,14742.5% 70,03014.4% 23,711
198855.9% 88,07042.1% 66,2542.0% 3,189
198458.3% 101,95139.8% 69,5901.9% 3,399
198051.9% 82,53138.7% 61,4869.4% 14,934
197651.2% 85,10245.8% 76,1943.0% 4,930
197262.0% 108,51135.6% 62,3022.4% 4,110
196846.3% 79,86243.1% 74,44210.6% 18,353
196435.1% 63,11463.4% 113,9191.5% 2,666
196045.1% 80,85350.7% 90,9504.2% 7,599
195660.7% 101,18237.1% 61,8592.2% 3,635
195254.3% 89,08343.1% 70,7272.7% 4,380
194845.8% 59,67546.1% 60,1478.1% 10,608
194449.5% 67,85650.1% 68,7370.4% 589
194048.2% 65,52351.4% 69,8800.4% 504
193640.1% 49,04658.4% 71,3841.4% 1,760
193245.0% 49,21849.9% 54,5765.1% 5,610
192854.5% 57,70844.6% 47,1670.9% 959
192462.3% 43,38416.7% 11,64420.9% 14,571
192072.1% 42,69220.1% 11,8737.9% 4,660
191655.3% 18,75439.4% 13,3405.3% 1,810
191217.5% 5,34935.4% 10,81047.1% 14,372
190856.0% 17,63838.0% 11,9606.1% 1,918
190456.4% 17,70536.7% 11,5326.9% 2,150
190053.0% 15,61943.7% 12,8923.3% 973
189658.8% 15,43735.3% 9,2805.8% 1,530
County CPVI: D+8
In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 50.8% of the vote here (57,010 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 43.2% (48,500 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 3.8% (4,288 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (981 votes), among the 112,278 ballots cast by the county's 262,723 registered voters, yielding a 42.7% turnout.[56]
Municipalities
labeled outline map of municipalities
Interactive map of municipalities in Passaic County
Municipalities in Passaic County (with 2010 Census data for population, housing units and area in square miles) are:[57] Other, unincorporated communities in the county are listed next to their parent municipality. Most of these areas are census-designated places (CDPs) that have been created by the United States Census Bureau for enumeration purposes within a Township. Other communities and enclaves that exist within a municipality are also listed next to the name.
MunicipalityMun.
type
Pop.Housing
units
Total
area
Water
area
Land
Area
Pop.
density
Housing
density
School districtUnincorporated
communities / notes
Bloomingdaleborough7,6563,0899.170.458.71878.6354.5Butler (9-12) (S/R)
Bloomingdale (K-8)
Cliftoncity84,13631,94611.400.1411.267,472.02,837.1Clifton
Haledonborough8,3182,9321.160.001.157,203.92,539.3Manchester (9-12)
Haledon (PK-8)
Hawthorneborough18,7917,7563.360.033.335,635.32,326.0Hawthorne
Little Fallstownship14,4324,9252.810.072.745,276.21,800.5Passaic Valley (9-12)
Little Falls (K-8)
Great Notch
Singac CDP (3,618)
North Haledonborough8,4173,2133.500.043.452,436.8930.2Manchester (9-12)
North Haledon (PK-8)
Passaiccity69,78120,4323.240.103.1522,179.66,494.2Passaic
Patersoncity146,19947,9468.700.288.4317,346.35,688.7Paterson
Pompton Lakesborough11,0974,3413.190.282.913,809.11,490.1Pompton Lakes
Prospect Parkborough5,8651,9310.480.000.4812,347.24,065.2Manchester (9-12)
Prospect Park (PK-8)
Ringwoodborough12,2284,33128.172.9625.21485.0171.8Lakeland (9-12)
Ringwood (K-8)
Totowaborough10,8043,9184.070.073.992,704.9980.9Passaic Valley (9-12)
Totowa (PK-8)
Wanaqueborough11,1164,1849.251.267.991,391.2523.7Lakeland (9-12)
Wanaque (PK-8)
Haskell
Waynetownship54,71719,76825.171.4523.732,306.0833.1WaynePackanack Lake
Pines Lake
Preakness
West Milfordtownship25,85010,41980.325.2375.09344.3138.8West MilfordCooper
Hewitt
Macopin
Newfoundland
Oak Ridge
Woodland Parkborough11,8194,8353.110.152.963,987.91,631.4Passaic Valley (9-12)
Woodland Park (K-8)
(formerly West
Paterson)
Passaic Countycounty501,226175,966197.1112.51184.592,715.3953.3
Economy
Education
Media
Passaic County is served by New York City-based commercial television & radio stations and New Jersey Network public television.
Points of interest
See also
National Register of Historic Places listings in Passaic County, New Jersey
References
  1. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 209. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  2. ^ a b New Jersey County Map, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed July 10, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d e f DP-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010; 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000; Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 23, 2013.
  5. ^ NJ Labor Market Views Archived 2013-09-20 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, March 15, 2011. Accessed October 6, 2013.
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  7. ^ QuickFacts - Passaic County, New Jersey; New Jersey; United States, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 24, 2018.
  8. ^ Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017 - 2017 Population Estimates Archived February 13, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 24, 2018.
  9. ^ GCT-PEPANNCHG: Estimates of Resident Population Change and Rankings: July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017 - State -- County / County Equivalent from the 2017 Population Estimates for New Jersey Archived February 13, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 24, 2018.
  10. ^ New Jersey County High Points, Peakbagger.com. Accessed October 5, 2013.
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  12. ^ a b Monthly Averages for Paterson, New Jersey, The Weather Channel. Accessed October 13, 2012.
  13. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  14. ^ Forstall, Richard L. Population of states and counties of the United States: 1790 to 1990 from the Twenty-one Decennial Censuses, pp. 108-109. United States Census Bureau, March 1996. ISBN 9780934213486. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  15. ^ U.S. Census Bureau Delivers New Jersey's 2010 Census Population Totals, United States Census Bureau, February 3, 2011. Accessed February 5, 2011.
  16. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 3, 2013. Accessed August 31, 2014.
  17. ^ U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
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  19. ^ DP-2 - Profile of Selected Social Characteristics: 2000 from the Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  20. ^ DP-3 - Profile of Selected Economic Characteristics: 2000 from Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  21. ^ Passaic County Courthouse/Administration Complex , Emporis. Accessed July 9, 2015.
  22. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  23. ^ Gallo Jr., Bill. "Which N.J. county freeholders are paid the most?", NJ.com, March 11, 2016. Accessed October 25, 2017. "Freeholder director: $29,500; Other freeholders: $28,500"
  24. ^ Administration, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  25. ^ Meet Your Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  26. ^ 2019 County Data Sheet, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  27. ^ a b Passaic County 2019 Directory, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  28. ^ New Jersey State Constitution (1947), Article VII, Section II, Paragraph 2, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed October 26, 2017.
  29. ^ Passaic County Clerk, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  30. ^ Members List: Clerks, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
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  32. ^ Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik, Passaic County Sheriff's Office. Accessed October 24, 2017.
  33. ^ Members List: Sheriffs, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed October 22, 2017.
  34. ^ Our Surrogate, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  35. ^ Members List: Surrogates, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed October 22, 2017.
  36. ^ Prosecutor Camelia M. Valdes, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 18, 2019.
  37. ^ "Governor Chris Christie Files Nominations", Governor of New Jersey Chris Christie, press release dated June 15, 2015. Accessed October 29, 2017. "PASSAIC COUNTY PROSECUTOR - Nominate for reappointment Camelia M. Valdes (Bloomingdale, Passaic))"
  38. ^ Passaic Vicinage, New Jersey Courts. Accessed October 24, 2017.
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  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
  44. ^ Biography, Congressman Bill Pascrell. Accessed January 3, 2019."A native son of Paterson, N.J., Congressman Bill Pascrell, Jr. has built a life of public service upon the principles he learned while growing up on the south side of the Silk City."
  45. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
  46. ^ "Municipalities". www.passaiccountynj.org​. Retrieved 2021-05-07.
  47. ^ a b "New Jersey Legislature - Legislative Roster". www.njleg.state.nj.us. Retrieved 2021-05-07.
  48. ^ Assembly Committee Substitute for Assembly, No. 2635, New Jersey Legislature, June 7, 2004. Accessed October 31, 2014.
  49. ^ DEP Guidance for the Highlands Water Protection and Planning Act-Highlands Region Counties and Municipalities; Highlands Municipalities, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, updated July 8, 2014. Accessed October 31, 2014.
  50. ^ "NJ Voter Registration by County" (PDF). NJ DOS - NJ Division of Elections.
  51. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Passaic, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  52. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey , United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  53. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  54. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  55. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-06-10.
  56. ^ 2009 Governor: Passaic County Archived 2012-08-22 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  57. ^ GCT-PH1: Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 19, 2014.
  58. ^ About Toys "R" Us, Inc., Toys "R" Us, Inc. Accessed August 22, 2014. "Headquartered in Wayne, NJ, Toys"R"Us, Inc. employs approximately 70,000 employees worldwide."
  59. ^ Company Information, Valley National Bank. Accessed August 22, 2014. "Valley National Bancorp is a regional bank holding company headquartered in Wayne, New Jersey with $16 billion in assets."
  60. ^ http://www.jvc.com › Company
  61. ^ President's Message, Passaic County Community College. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  62. ^ University Facts, William Paterson University. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  63. ^ At a Glance, Montclair State University. Accessed October 6, 2013.
  64. ^ Dey Mansion, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 24, 2017.
  65. ^ Garret Mountain Reservation, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 24, 2017.
  66. ^ Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park, National Park Service. Accessed October 24, 2017.
  67. ^ High Mountain Park Preserve, New York–New Jersey Trail Conference. Accessed October 27, 2017.
  68. ^ Lambert Castle, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed October 24, 2017.
  69. ^ Long Pond Ironworks State Park, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Division of Parks and Forestry. Accessed October 24, 2017.
  70. ^ Paterson Museum, Passaic, New Jersey. Accessed October 24, 2017.
  71. ^ Ringwood State Park, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Division of Parks and Forestry. Accessed October 24, 2017.
  72. ^ About NJBG, New Jersey State Botanical Garden. Accessed August 31, 2014. "Skylands was sold in 1922 to Clarence McKenzie Lewis (1877-1959), an investment banker and also a trustee of the New York Botanical Garden. When Mr. Lewis purchased the property, he set out to make it a botanical showplace.... In 1966, New Jersey purchased the 1,117 acres of Skylands from Shelton College, which had used it as a campus."
  73. ^ Yogi Berra Stadium History, New Jersey Jackals. Accessed August 31, 2014.
External links
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Passaic County, New Jersey.
Passaic County web site

Last edited on 7 May 2021, at 14:09
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