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Sumo languages
Sumo (also known as Sumu) is the collective name for a group of Misumalpan languages spoken in Nicaragua and Honduras. Hale & Salamanca (2001) classify the Sumu languages into a northern Mayangna, composed of the Tawahka and Panamahka dialects, and southern Ulwa. Sumu specialist Ken Hale considered the differences between Ulwa and Mayangna in both vocabulary and morphology to be so considerable that he prefers to speak of Ulwa as a language distinct from the northern Sumu varieties.
Sumo
Sumu
Native toNicaragua, Honduras
RegionHuaspuc River and its tributaries
EthnicitySumo people
Native speakers
9,000 (1997–2009)[1]
Misumalpan
Sumalpan
Sumo
Language codes
ISO 639-3Either:
yan – Mayangna
ulw – Ulwa
Glottologsumu1234
ELPSumo
Phonology
Consonants
LabialAlveolarPalatalVelarGlottal
plainlateral
Nasalvoicelessŋ̊
voicedmnŋ
Stopvoicelessptk
voicedbd
Fricativesh
Approximantvoicedwlj
voiceless
Trillvoiceless
voicedr
Vowels
FrontBack
shortlongshortlong
Closeiu
Opena
Sources
References
^ Mayangna at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
Ulwa at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)

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Last edited on 8 March 2021, at 05:43
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