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Thamir bin Abdulaziz Al Saud
Thamir bin Abdulaziz Al Saud (1937 – 27 June 1958) was a member of the House of Saud. He died young and therefore, held no important cabinet position.
Thamir bin Abdulaziz Al Saud
Born1937
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Died27 June 1958 (aged 20–21)
San Francisco, United States
IssuePrince Faisal bin Thamir Al Saud
Names
Thamir bin Abdulaziz bin Abdul Rahman bin Faisal bin Turki bin Abdullah bin Muhammad bin Saud
HouseHouse of Saud
FatherKing Abdulaziz
MotherNouf bint Nawwaf bin Nuri Al Shaalan
Biography
Prince Thamir was born in 1937.[1][2] He was the son of King Abdulaziz and Nouf bint Nawwaf bin Nuri Al Shaalan.[3][4] They married in November 1935.[5] She was from the Ruwala tribe based in the northwestern Saudi Arabia, Transjordan and Syria.[2] Prince Thamir had two full brothers; Prince Mamdouh and Prince Mashhur.[1][6][7] Prince Thamir committed suicide in 1958.[1][4]
Prince Thamir had a son, Faisal, who was among the members of the Allegiance Commission.[8] Faisal bin Thamir's ex-wife is Seeta bint Abdullah, a daughter of former ruler of Saudi Arabia, King Abdullah.[9]
Ancestry
Ancestors of Thamir bin Abdulaziz Al Saud
16. Turki bin Abdullah bin Muhammad
8. Faisal bin Turki bin Abdullah Al Saud
17. Hia bint Hamad bin Ali Al Faqih Angari Tamimi
4. Abdul Rahman bin Faisal
18. Mishari bin Abdulrahman bin Hassan Al Saud
9. Sara bint Mishari bin Abdulrahman bin Hassan Al Saud
2. Abdulaziz ibn Saud
20. Mohammed bin Turki bin Suleiman Al Sudairi
10. Ahmed Al Kabir bin Mohammed bin Turki Al Sudairi
5. Sara bint Ahmed Al Kabir bin Mohammed Al Sudairi
1. Thamir bin Abdulaziz Al Saud
12. Nuri Al Shaalan
6. Nawwaf bin Nuri Al Shaalan
3. Nuf bint Nawwaf bin Nuri Al Shaalan
References
  1. ^ a b c "Appendix 6. The Sons of Abdulaziz"(PDF). Springer. p. 179. Retrieved 13 August 2020.
  2. ^ a b Alexander Blay Bligh (1981). Succession to the throne in Saudi Arabia. Court Politics in the Twentieth Century (PhD thesis). Columbia University. p. 93. Retrieved 25 May 2021.
  3. ^ Leslie McLoughlin (21 January 1993). Ibn Saud: Founder of A Kingdom. Palgrave Macmillan UK. p. 143. ISBN 978-1-349-22578-1.
  4. ^ a b Joseph A. Kechichian (2001). Succession in Saudi Arabia. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 179.
  5. ^ "مصاهرة الملك عبدالعزيز للقبائل". KSA Studies (in Arabic). 22 October 2017. Retrieved 8 September 2020.
  6. ^ Simon Henderson (August 2009). "After King Abdullah" (Policy Focus). Washington Institute. Retrieved 25 January 2015.
  7. ^ Elie Elhadj (15 August 2018). Oil and God: Sustainable Energy Will Defeat Wahhabi Terror. Universal-Publishers. p. 167. ISBN 978-1-58112-607-5.
  8. ^ Joseph A. Kechichian (2013). Legal and Political Reforms in Saudi Arabia. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 978-0-415-63018-4.
  9. ^ "رسالة من ابناء واحفاد الملك عبدالله رحمه الله". Almrsal (in Arabic). 3 February 2015. Retrieved 1 November 2020.
Last edited on 25 May 2021, at 18:24
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