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Tippecanoe County, Indiana
Tippecanoe County is located in the west central portion of the U.S. state of Indiana about 22 miles east of the Illinois state line. As of the 2010 census, the population was 172,780.[1] The county seat and largest city is Lafayette.[2] It was created in 1826 from Wabash County portion of New Purchase and unorganized territory.[3]
Tippecanoe County
U.S. county

Tippecanoe County courthouse in Lafayette, Indiana

Location within the U.S. state of Indiana

Indiana's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 40°23′N 86°53′W
Country United States
State
 Indiana
FoundedMarch 1, 1826
Named forKethtippecanoogi ("Place of the Succor Fish People" in Miami)
SeatLafayette
Largest cityLafayette
Area
 • Total503.24 sq mi (1,303.4 km2)
 • Land499.81 sq mi (1,294.5 km2)
 • Water3.44 sq mi (8.9 km2)  0.68%%
Population
 • Estimate (2021)199,562
 • Density381/sq mi (147/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district4th
Website
www.tippecanoe.in.gov
Indiana county number 79
Tippecanoe County was formed March 1, 1826, and named for the anglicization of "Kethtippecanoogi", a Miami people term meaning "place of the succor fish people." (Kriebel, Robert C. - Tippecanoe at 2000: A Hoosier County Recalls Its Past). The county is best known for Purdue University, the 1811 Battle of Tippecanoe, and the Tippecanoe County Courthouse, a structure built in 1881 and included in the National Register of Historic Places.
Tippecanoe County is part of the Lafayette, Indiana, Metropolitan Statistical Area.
History
Further information: History of Indiana and Lafayette, Indiana § History
The history of Tippecanoe County spans six distinct political and cultural periods: Native American lands from at least 8000BC, including the Mississippian culture, French occupation (part of New France beginning in the 1670s), British occupation starting in 1763, part of the United States Northwest Territory in 1787, part of Indiana Territory in 1800, and finally part of the State of Indiana in 1816. The political organization of the county began in 1826 by act of the Indiana Legislature.
The first European explorers arrived in the 1670s and the first permanent settlement was Fort Ouiatenon by the French established in 1717. Lafayette was platted in 1825 and Purdue University founded in 1869.
Geography
According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 503.24 square miles (1,303.4 km2), of which 499.81 square miles (1,294.5 km2) (or 99.32%) is land and 3.44 square miles (8.9 km2) (or 0.68%) is water.[4] The county's highest point is in the Lauramie Township.[5]
Adjacent counties
Communities
The county courthouse and nearby buildings along the Wabash River in Lafayette and West Lafayette
The view northeast into the town of Battle Ground
Cities
Towns
Census-designated places
Other unincorporated places
Extinct
Townships
A freight train approaches the town of South Raub on the border of Randolph and Wea Townships.
Climate and weather
Lafayette, Indiana
Climate chart (explanation)
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
1.8
 
 
33
17
 
 
1.6
 
 
39
22
 
 
2.9
 
 
50
31
 
 
3.5
 
 
62
40
 
 
3.9
 
 
74
51
 
 
4.2
 
 
83
60
 
 
3.8
 
 
86
65
 
 
3.9
 
 
84
63
 
 
2.7
 
 
78
55
 
 
2.6
 
 
66
43
 
 
2.8
 
 
51
34
 
 
2.6
 
 
38
23
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[7]
Metric conversion
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
47
 
 
1
−8
 
 
40
 
 
4
−6
 
 
73
 
 
10
−1
 
 
88
 
 
17
4
 
 
100
 
 
23
11
 
 
108
 
 
28
16
 
 
97
 
 
30
18
 
 
99
 
 
29
17
 
 
70
 
 
26
13
 
 
65
 
 
19
6
 
 
71
 
 
11
1
 
 
65
 
 
3
−5
Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation totals in mm
In recent years, temperatures in Lafayette have ranged from an average low of 17 °F (−8 °C) in January to a high of 86 °F (30 °C) in July, although a record low of −23 °F (−31 °C) was recorded in January 1985 and a record high of 105 °F (41 °C) was recorded in June 1988. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 1.58 inches (40 mm) inches in February to 4.24 inches (108 mm) inches in June.[7]
Transportation
Highways
Railroads
Three different railroad lines intersect in Tippecanoe County, all running through the Lafayette area. CSX Transportation operates a north–south line; Norfolk Southern Railway operates a southwest-to-northeast line,[8] and the Kankakee, Beaverville and Southern Railroad operates a daily-service line running from the northwest to the southeast.
The Amtrak Cardinal stops at the Lafayette Station 3 times a week, and is the only provider of passenger rail service to Greater Lafayette.
Airport
The county contains one public-use airport: Purdue University Airport (LAF) in West Lafayette, Indiana.[9]
Government
See also: Government of Indiana
The county government is a constitutional body, and is granted specific powers by the Constitution of Indiana, and by the Indiana Code.
County Council: The county council is the fiscal branch of the county government and controls all the spending and revenue collection in the county. The county council and the board of commissioners share legislative authority.[10] Representatives are elected from county districts. The council members serve four-year terms. They are responsible for setting salaries, the annual budget, and special spending. The council also has limited authority to impose local taxes, in the form of an income and property tax that is subject to state level approval, excise taxes, and service taxes.[11][12]
Board of Commissioners: The executive body of the county is made of a board of commissioners. The commissioners are elected county-wide, in staggered terms, and each serves a four-year term. One of the commissioners, typically the most senior, serves as president. The commissioners are charged with executing the acts legislated by the council, collecting revenue, and managing the day-to-day functions of the county government.[11][12]
Court: The county maintains a small claims court that can handle some civil cases. The judge on the court is elected to a term of four years and must be a member of the Indiana Bar Association. The judge is assisted by a constable who is also elected to a four-year term. In some cases, court decisions can be appealed to the state level circuit court.[12]
County Officials: The county has several other elected offices, including sheriff, coroner, auditor, treasurer, recorder, surveyor, and circuit court clerk. Each of these elected officers serves a term of four years and oversees a different part of county government. Members elected to county government positions are required to declare party affiliations and to be residents of the county.[12]
Politics
In the 2008 Democratic primary, Tippecanoe County was one of 10 (out of 92) Indiana counties to give the majority of its votes to Barack Obama.[13] In the 2008 Presidential election, Tippecanoe County was one of 15 Indiana counties to give the majority of its votes to Obama/Biden. Thanks to the sizable support of Purdue University students, Tippecanoe County played a pivotal role in Barack Obama's upset win in Indiana (49.9%-49.0%; 1,367,264 votes to 1,341,101 votes) by supporting the Democratic ticket of Barack Obama/Joe Biden 55.1%-43.5% over the Republican ticket of John McCain/Sarah Palin.[14] However, in the 2020 Presidential election, Tippecanoe County also voted for Democrat Joe Biden by a margin of 436 votes, the first time since 2008 the county went for the Democrats.
Tippecanoe County is one of only twelve counties to have voted for Obama in 2008, Romney in 2012, Trump in 2016, and Biden in 2020, a pattern that was particularly evident in the Mountain West.[a]
Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[15]
YearRepublicanDemocraticThird parties
202048.4% 34,58149.0% 35,0172.6% 1,850
201648.6% 30,76843.1% 27,2828.4% 5,289
201250.4% 28,75746.8% 26,7112.8% 1,595
200843.5% 29,82255.1% 37,7811.5% 1,033
200459.0% 30,89739.8% 20,8181.2% 645
200056.4% 26,10639.4% 18,2204.3% 1,969
199649.5% 22,55637.8% 17,23212.7% 5,798
199245.8% 23,05034.5% 17,34319.8% 9,941
198862.9% 27,89736.6% 16,2560.5% 211
198464.8% 29,70634.4% 15,7890.8% 381
198056.9% 27,58930.2% 14,63612.9% 6,245
197661.3% 29,18637.5% 17,8501.2% 551
197268.1% 31,56531.5% 14,5980.4% 203
196859.4% 24,35235.5% 14,5285.1% 2,088
196448.4% 19,03651.5% 20,2570.2% 79
196063.6% 24,57236.3% 14,0410.1% 55
195670.3% 23,77629.5% 9,9950.2% 72
195270.5% 23,44729.1% 9,6780.4% 121
194860.6% 17,03438.5% 10,8250.9% 248
194460.6% 15,88839.0% 10,2290.4% 95
194057.0% 16,14842.8% 12,1290.3% 73
193650.1% 13,08148.7% 12,7321.2% 309
193246.1% 11,81853.0% 13,6090.9% 236
192863.3% 15,16536.4% 8,7200.4% 93
192458.4% 12,16136.6% 7,6195.0% 1,043
192061.7% 12,73036.6% 7,5621.7% 347
191654.7% 6,38642.2% 4,9183.1% 365
191228.2% 3,00641.7% 4,44230.1% 3,205
190853.4% 6,16443.2% 4,9843.4% 391
190459.8% 6,58136.7% 4,0313.5% 388
190056.3% 6,31741.6% 4,6732.1% 232
189656.8% 6,23942.2% 4,6391.0% 111
189251.1% 4,85646.2% 4,3862.8% 261
188853.4% 5,07245.1% 4,2811.6% 147
Demographics
Historical population
CensusPop.
18307,187
184013,72491.0%
185019,37741.2%
186025,72632.8%
187033,51530.3%
188035,9667.3%
189035,078−2.5%
190038,65910.2%
191040,0633.6%
192042,8136.9%
193047,53511.0%
194051,0207.3%
195074,47346.0%
196089,12219.7%
1970109,37822.7%
1980121,70211.3%
1990130,5987.3%
2000148,95514.1%
2010172,78016.0%
2019 (est.)195,732[16]13.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[17]
1790-1960[18] 1900-1990[19]
1990-2000[20] 2010-2019[1]
As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 172,780 people, 65,532 households, and 37,003 families residing in the county.[21] The population density was 345.7 inhabitants per square mile (133.5/km2). There were 71,096 housing units at an average density of 142.2 per square mile (54.9/km2).[4] The racial makeup of the county was 84.0% white, 6.2% Asian, 4.0% black or African American, 0.3% American Indian, 3.3% from other races, and 2.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 7.5% of the population.[21] In terms of ancestry, 27.5% were German, 13.9% were Irish, 10.8% were English, and 6.1% were American.[22]
Of the 65,532 households, 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.4% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 43.5% were non-families, and 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.02. The median age was 27.7 years.[21]
The median income for a household in the county was $47,697 and the median income for a family was $60,367. Males had a median income of $45,018 versus $31,995 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,203. About 10.3% of families and 20.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.2% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over.[23]
Education
Public schools in rural/suburban Tippecanoe County are administered by the Tippecanoe School Corporation, while those in the cities are under either the Lafayette School Corporation or West Lafayette Community School Corporation. Purdue and Ivy Tech each have campuses at other sites in Indiana.
Libraries
Universities and colleges
High Schools
Middle Schools/Junior High Schools
Elementary Schools
Private Schools
Economy
Much of the economy of Tippecanoe County is centered in its two largest communities: Lafayette and West Lafayette. Purdue University is by far the largest employer in the county, but private industry and commerce independent of the university also employ many others. Major employers include Subaru-Indiana Automotive, Wabash National, Caterpillar, Fairfield Manufacturing, Franciscan St. Elizabeth Health, Alcoa, State Farm, and IUHealth Arnett.
Notable people
Jesse Lloyd[26]
See also
Notes
^ The other eleven are Butte County, California; Teton County, Idaho; Kendall County, Illinois; McLean County, Illinois; Kent County, Michigan; Leelanau County, Michigan; Carroll County, New Hampshire; Rockingham County, New Hampshire; Marion County, Oregon; Grand County, Utah; and Albany County, Wyoming.
References
  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ DeHart 1909, p. 151.
  4. ^ a b "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-12. Retrieved 2015-07-10.
  5. ^ https://www.peakbagger.com/peak.aspx?pid=23354
  6. ^​http://www.ingenweb.org/intippecanoe/ghosttowns.htm
  7. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Lafayette, Indiana". The Weather Channel. Retrieved 2011-01-27.
  8. ^ "Indiana Railroads" (PDF). Indiana Department of Transportation. 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-11-18. Retrieved 2010-12-11.
  9. ^ Public and Private Airports, Tippecanoe County, Indiana
  10. ^ "Guide to Indiana County Government" (PDF). Association of Indiana Counties. Retrieved October 27, 2016.
  11. ^ a b Indiana Code. "Title 36, Article 2, Section 3". IN.gov. Retrieved 2008-09-16.
  12. ^ a b c d Indiana Code. "Title 2, Article 10, Section 2" (PDF). IN.gov. Retrieved 2008-09-16.
  13. ^ "Election Center 2008: Primary Results - Elections & Politics news from CNN.com". CNN. Retrieved May 25, 2010.
  14. ^ "2008 presidential election results".
  15. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-05-20.
  16. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  17. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  18. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  19. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  20. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  21. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2015-07-10.
  22. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-14. Retrieved 2015-07-10.
  23. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-14. Retrieved 2015-07-10.
  24. ^ "Home - Tippecanoe County Public Library". tcpl.lib.in.us. Retrieved 2018-04-29.
  25. ^ "West Lafayette Public Library - Home". wlaf.lib.in.us. Retrieved 2018-04-29.
  26. ^ Stagg, Ronald J. "Lloyd, Jesse". Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online. University of Toronto/Université Laval.
Bibliography
External links
Last edited on 6 April 2021, at 04:23
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