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Venezuelan bolívar
The bolívar soberano (sovereign bolívar, sign: Bs.S or Bs.; code: VES)[1][4] has been the official currency of Venezuela since 20 August 2018.
Venezuelan bolívar soberano
bolívar soberano venezolano (Spanish)
ISO 4217
CodeVES
Denominations
Subunit
1100céntimo
Pluralbolívares soberanos
SymbolBs.S, Bs.[1] or B$
Nicknamebolo(s), luca(s), real(es)
Banknotes
 Freq. usedBs.S 10.000, 20.000, 50.000, 200.000, 500.000, 1.000.000
 Rarely usedBs.S 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500[1]
Coins
 Rarely used50 céntimos, Bs.S 1
Demographics
User(s)
 Venezuela
Issuance
Central bankBanco Central de Venezuela
 Website
www.bcv.org.ve
Valuation
Inflation1,698,488% (2018 est.)[2]
ValueOfficial rate
US$1 = Bs.S 1,889,000
(Mar 7, 2021)[1]
Parallel rate
US$1 = Bs.S 2,358,827
(Apr 20, 2021)[3]
The bolívar soberano replaced the bolívar fuerte (strong bolívar, sign: Bs.F, code: VEF) after a transition period.[5] The primary reason for replacement, at a rate of 1 Bs.S to 100,000 Bs.F, was hyperinflation.[6]
On 1 January 2008, the bolívar fuerte had itself replaced, because of inflation,[7] the original bolívar introduced in 1879 (sign: Bs.; code: VEB).[1] It did so at a rate of 1 Bs.F to 1000 Bs.
With an exchange rate exceeding two million bolívares per U.S. dollar in April 2021, the bolívar soberano is the lowest valued unit of currency in circulation in the world.
History
Bolívar
Bolívar
Preceded by:
Venezolano
Reason: unification of circulating currencies
Ratio: 15 venezolano = 1 bolívar
Currency of Venezuela
31 March 1879 – 31 December 2007
Succeeded by:
Bolívar fuerte
Reason: inflation
Ratio: 1000 bolívares = 1 bolívar fuerte
Venezuelan bolívar
bolívar  (Spanish)
ISO 4217
CodeVEB
Number862
Denominations
Subunit
1100céntimo
Pluralbolívares
céntimocéntimos
SymbolBs.
Banknotes1.000, 2.000, 5.000, 10,000, 20,000, 50,000 bolívares
Coins10, 20, 50, 100, 500, 1000 bolívares
Demographics
User(s)
 Venezuela
Issuance
Central bankBanco Central de Venezuela
 Website
www.bcv.org.ve
This infobox shows the latest status before this currency was rendered obsolete.
The Bolívar is named after the hero of Latin American independence Simón Bolívar. The bolívar was adopted by the monetary law of 1879, replacing the short-lived venezolano at a rate of five bolívares to one venezolano. Initially, the bolívar was defined on the silver standard, equal to 4.5 g fine silver, following the principles of the Latin Monetary Union. The monetary law of 1887 made the gold bolívar unlimited legal tender, and the gold standard came into full operation in 1910. Venezuela went off gold in 1930, and in 1934, the bolívar exchange rate was fixed in terms of the U.S. dollar at a rate of 3.914 bolívares = 1 U.S. dollar, revalued to 3.18 bolívares = 1 U.S. dollar in 1937, a rate which lasted until 1941. Until 18 February 1983 (now called Black Friday (Viernes Negro) by many Venezuelans),[8] the bolívar had been the region's most stable and internationally accepted currency. It then fell prey to high devaluation.
Exchange controls were imposed on February 5, 2003, to limit capital flight.[9] The rate was pegged to the U.S. dollar at a fixed exchange rate of Bs 1,600 to the dollar.
Bolívar fuerte
Bolívar fuerte
Preceded by:
Bolívar
Reason: inflation
Ratio: 1000 bolívares = 1 bolívar fuerte
Currency of Venezuela
1 January 2008 – 20 August 2018
Succeeded by:
Bolívar soberano
Reason:hyperinflation
Ratio: 100,000 bolívares fuertes = 1 bolívar soberano
Venezuelan bolívar fuerte
bolívar fuerte venezolano (Spanish)
ISO 4217
CodeVEF
Denominations
Subunit
1100céntimo
Pluralbolívares fuertes
SymbolBs.F[1] or Bs.
Nicknamebolo(s), luca(s), real(es)
Banknotes
 Freq. usedBs.F 1000, 2000, 5000, 10,000, 20,000, 100,000[1]
 Rarely usedBs.F 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500
Coins
 Rarely usedBs.F 1, 10, 50, and 100[1]
Demographics
User(s)
 Venezuela
Issuance
Central bankBanco Central de Venezuela
 Website
www.bcv.org.ve
Valuation
Inflation80,000% (2018 est.)[10]
Pegged withUS$1 = Bs. 248,832 (Dicom auction)[1]
(see this section for parallel market rate)[11]
This infobox shows the latest status before this currency was rendered obsolete.
Coins and low-value banknotes were rendered obsolete by hyperinflation.
The government announced on 7 March 2007 that the bolívar would be revalued at a ratio of 1,000 to 1 on 1 January 2008 and renamed the bolívar fuerte in an effort to facilitate the ease of transaction and accounting.[12] The newer name is literally translated as "strong bolívar"[13][14] but is also a reference to an old coin called the peso fuerte worth 10 Spanish reales.[15] The name "bolívar fuerte" is used to distinguish it from the older currency that was being used along with the bolívar fuerte.[16][original research?] The official exchange rate is restricted to individuals by CADIVI, which imposes an annual limit on the amount available for travel.
Inflation represented by the time it would take, in years, for money to lose 90% of its value (301-day rolling average, inverted logarithmic scale).
Since the government of Hugo Chávez established strict currency controls in 2003, there have been a series of five currency devaluations, disrupting the economy.[17] On 8 January 2010, the value was changed by the government from the fixed exchange rate of 2.15 bolívares fuertes to 2.60 bolívares for some imports (certain foods and healthcare goods) and 4.30 bolívares for other imports like cars, petrochemicals, and electronics.[18] On 4 January 2011, the fixed exchange rate became 4.30 bolívares for US$1.00 for both sides of the economy. On 13 February 2013 the bolívar fuerte was devalued to 6.30 bolívares per US$1 in an attempt to counter budget deficits.[19] On 18 February 2016, President Maduro used his newly granted economic powers to devalue the official exchange rate of the bolívar fuerte from 6.3 Bs.F per US$1 to 10 Bs.F per US$1, which is a 37% depreciation against the U.S. dollar.[20]
The bolívar fuerte entered hyperinflation in November 2016.[21]
On January 26, 2018, the government retired the protected and subsidized 10 Bs.F per US$1 exchange rate that was highly overvalued as a result of rampant inflation.[22] On February 5, 2018, the Central Bank of Venezuela announced a 99.6% [sic] devaluation, with the exchange rate going to 25,000 Bs.F per USD. This made the bolívar fuerte the second-least valued circulating currency in the world based on the official exchange rate, behind only the Iranian rial, and between September 2017 and August 2018, according to the informal exchange rate, the bolívar fuerte was the least valued circulating currency unit in the world.[23][dubious discuss]
The official exchange rate stood at 248,832 VEF/USD as of August 10, 2018, making it the least valued circulating currency in the world based on official exchange rates.[24]
In June 2018, the government authorized a new exchange rate for buying, but not selling currency. On August 13, 2018, the rate was 4,010,000 VEF/USD according to ZOOM Remesas.[25]
Bolívar soberano
Bolívar soberano
Preceded by:
Bolívar fuerte
Reason:hyperinflation
Ratio: 100,000 bolívares fuertes = 1 bolívar soberano
Currency of Venezuela
20 August 2018 –
On 22 March 2018, President Nicolás Maduro announced a new monetary reform program, with a planned revaluation of the currency at a ratio of 1 to 1,000.[26] The change was to be made effective from 4 June 2018.[27][28]
In May 2018, the government required prices to be expressed in both bolívares fuertes and bolívares soberanos at the then-planned rate of 1,000 to 1. For example, one kilogram of pasta was shown with a price of BsF. 695,000 and BsS. 695. Prices expressed in the new currency were rounded to the nearest 50 céntimos as that was expected to be the lowest denomination in circulation at launch. The rounding created difficulties because some items and sales qualities were priced at significantly less than 0.50 BsS.; for example a litre of gasoline and a Caracas Metro ticket typically cost BsS. 0.06 and BsS. 0.04, respectively.[29]
Play media
President Nicolas Maduro announcing the redenomination of the Venezuelan bolívar on 17 August 2018.
The change in currency was originally scheduled for June 4, 2018. The President delayed the planned June launch date of the bolívar soberano, citing from Aristides Maza, "the period established to carry out the conversion is not enough".[30] The revaluation was rescheduled to 20 August 2018, and the rate changed to 100,000 to 1, with prices being required to be expressed at the new rate starting 1 August 2018.[31]
On 20 August 2018, the Maduro government launched the new bolívar soberano currency,[32] with one bolívar soberano worth 100,000 bolívares fuertes. New coins in denominations of 50 céntimos and 1 bolívar soberano, and new banknotes in denominations of 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200 and 500 bolívares soberanos were introduced.[33] Under the country's official fixed exchange rate to the US dollar the new currency was devalued by roughly 95% compared to the old bolívar fuerte.[34] The day was declared a bank holiday to allow the banks to adjust to the new currency.[35] Initially, during a transition period the bolívar soberano was to be run alongside the bolívar fuerte.[5] However, from the start of the transition, on 20 August, bolívar fuerte notes of 500 and less could not be used; only deposited at banks.[36]
Concurrently with the release of the new currency, the minimum wage was raised to 1,800 bolívares soberanos per month,[37] a 33-fold increase,[38] and sales tax increased from 12% to 16%.[38]
Additionally, the bolívar soberano is supposed to have a fixed exchange rate to the petro cryptocurrency, with a rate of 3,600 bolívares soberanos to one petro;[39][40] a peg of petro and bolívar soberano was announced by Maduro as early as 15 August.[citation needed] The petro is supposedly tied to the price of a barrel of oil (about US$60 in August 2018).[39][40] As of the end of August 2018, there is no evidence that the cryptocurrency is being traded.[41] Petro is regarded by many as a scam.[42][41][43]
Following the introduction of the bolívar soberano, inflation increased from 61,463 percent on 21 August 2018 to 65,320 percent on 22 August 2018.[42] By 24 August 2018, the introduction of the bolívar soberano had not prevented hyperinflation.[44] According to inflation analyst Steve Hanke, between 18 August and 21 August 2018, the inflation rate increased from 48,760 percent to 65,320 percent.[21][42]
Currency black market
The value of one U.S. dollar in Venezuelan bolívares fuertes (before 20 August 2018) and bolívares soberanos on the parallel (or black) market through time. Vertical lines represent every time the currency has lost 99% of its value, which has happened four times since 2012. The graph shows that as of November 2020, the currency is worth about 6.6 million times less than it was worth in August 2012. Since the beginning of the presidential crisis in Venezuela in January 2019 and the relaxation of currency controls on May of that year, the curve has been less steep than previously, meaning that the rate at which the value is lost, inflation, has slowed down.
The black (or parallel) market value of the bolívar fuerte and the bolívar soberano has been significantly lower than the fixed exchange rate and other rates set by the Venezuelan government (SICAD, SIMADI, DICOM). In November 2013, it was almost one-tenth that of the official fixed exchange rate of 6.3 bolívares per U.S. dollar.[45] In September 2014, the currency black market rate for the bolívar fuerte reached 100 VEF/USD;[46] on 25 February 2015, it went over 200 VEF/USD.[47] on 7 May 2015, it was over 275 VEF/USD and on 22 September 2015, it was over 730 VEF/USD.[48] Venezuela still had the highest inflation rate in the world in July 2015.[49] By 3 February 2016, this rate reached 1,000 VEF/USD. This rate surpassed 4,300 VEF/USD on 10 December 2016. It surpassed 10,000 VEF/USD on 28 July 2017, and on 7 September 2017, the rate surpassed 20,000 VEF/USD for the first time. Inflation accelerated, and on 1 December 2017, it reached 100,000 VEF/USD for the first time ever. The rate surpassed 200,000 VEF/USD on 18 January 2018, then 500,000 VEF/USD on 16 April, 1 million VEF/USD on 30 May, 2 million VEF/USD on 7 June, and 5 million VEF/USD on 16 August.[3]
At the time of redomination on 20 August 2018, the exchange rate was 59.21 VES/USD. By the end of the month it reached 87 VES/USD. The rate then surpassed 100 VES/USD on 3 October 2018, 1,000 VES/USD on 9 January 2019, 10,000 VES/USD on 19 July, and 50,000 VES/USD on 29 December. According to DolarToday, the parallel exchange rate was 54,702.82 VES/USD as of 1 January 2020.[3]
Exchange rate history
It is illegal to publish the "parallel exchange rate" in Venezuela.[50] One popular website that has been publishing parallel exchange rates since 2010 is DolarToday, which has also been critical of the Maduro government.[51] This table shows a condensed history of the parallel foreign exchange rate of the Venezuelan bolívar (fuerte and soberano) to one United States dollar between 2012 and 2020, according to DolarToday.[52]
Bolívar fuerte (Bs.F)
1 Bs.F = 1,000 Bs.
Bolívar soberano (Bs.S)
1 Bs.S = 100,000 Bs.F
MonthExchange rate
August 201210
February 201320
June 201330
September 201340
October 201350
November 201360
January 201470
February 201480
August 201490
September 2014100
February 2015200
May 2015300–400
July 2015500–600
September 2015700–800
December 2015900
February 20161,000
October 20161,500
November 20162,000–4,000
MonthExchange rate
May 20175,000–6,000
June 20177,000–8,000
July 20178,000–11,000
August 201711,000–18,000
September 201718,000–29,000
October 201729,000–41,000
November 201741,000–97,000
December 2017103,000–111,000
January 2018111,000–236,000
February 2018214,000–228,000
March 2018213,000–236,000
April 2018236,000–621,000
May 2018621,000–1.3 million
June 20181.4–3.4 million
July 20183.4–3.6 million
August 20183.6–5.9 million
MonthExchange rate
August 201859–87
September 201887–98
October 201899–240
November 2018240–410
December 2018410–730
January 2019730–3,200
February 20192,400–3,700
March 20193,400–3,700
April 20193,700–6,100
May 20195,600–6,300
June 20196,300–7,900
July 20197,800–13,000
August 201913,000–26,000
September 201920,000–26,000
October 201919,000–26,000
November 201921,000–42,000
December 201940,000–55,000
MonthExchange rate
January 202057,300–83,300
February 202074,800–77,100
March 202071,800–87,400
April 202089,200–200,000
May 2020176,000–206,000
June195,000–214,000
July 2020205,000–268,000
August 2020266,000–345,000
September 2020346,000–452,000
October 2020449,000–542,000
November 2020524,000–950,000
December 2020940,000–1.2 million
Coins
Bolívar
Various Venezuelan coins
In 1879, silver coins were introduced in denominations of 15, 12, 1, 2, and 5 bolívares, together with gold 20 bolívares. Gold 100 bolívares were also issued between 1886 and 1889. In 1894, silver 14 bolívar coins were introduced, followed by cupro-nickel 5 and 1212 céntimos in 1896.
In 1912, production of gold coins ceased, whilst production of the 5 bolívares ended in 1936. In 1965, nickel replaced silver in the 25 and 50 céntimos, with the same happening to the 1 and 2 bolívares in 1967. In 1971, cupro-nickel 10 céntimo coins were issued, the 1212 céntimos having last been issued in 1958. A nickel 5 bolívares was introduced in 1973. Clad steel (first copper, then nickel and cupro-nickel) was used for the 5 céntimos from 1974. Nickel clad steel was introduced for all denominations from 25 céntimos up to 5 bolívares in 1989.
In 1998, after a period of high inflation, a new coinage was introduced consisting of 10, 20, 50, 100 and 500 bolívares denominations.
The former coins were:
5-venezolano coin
All the coins had the same design. On the obverse the left profile of the Libertador Simón Bolívar is depicted, along with the inscription "Bolívar Libertador" within a heptagon, symbolizing the seven stars of the flag. On the reverse the coat of arms is depicted, circled by the official name of the country, with the date and the denomination below. In 2001, the reverse design was changed, putting the denomination of the coin at the right of the shield of the coat of arms, Semi-Circled by the official name of the country and the year of its emission below.
Bolívar fuerte
Coins of the bolívar fuerte were in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 1212, 25, 50 céntimos, and 1 bolívar. They were quickly rendered obsolete by high inflation. It may be noticed that there was a 1212-céntimo coin and a 1-céntimo coin, but no 12-céntimo coin. Therefore, giving correct change for a purchase of, say, 412 céntimos would require using a 1212-céntimo coin and getting 8 céntimos back.
2008 Series
DenominationShapeCompositionWeightDiameterEdgeObverseReverseObverse imageReverse image
1 céntimoRoundCopper-plated steel1.36 g15 mmReededDenomination of the coin, the eight stars and waves representing the patterns of the national flagCoat of Arms of Venezuela and the name of the country of emission
5 céntimosRoundCopper-plated steel2.03 g17 mmPlainDenomination of the coin, the eight stars and waves representing the patterns of the national flagCoat of Arms of Venezuela and the name of the country of emission
10 céntimosRoundNickel-plated steel2.62 g18 mmReededDenomination of the coin, the eight stars and waves representing the patterns of the national flagCoat of Arms of Venezuela and the name of the country of emission
1212 céntimos
RoundNickel-plated steel3.93 g23 mmPlainDenomination of the coin, the eight stars of the national flag and two palm branchesCoat of Arms of Venezuela and the name of the country of emission
25 céntimosRoundNickel-plated steel3.86 g20 mmPlainDenomination of the coin, the eight stars and waves representing the patterns of the national flagCoat of Arms of Venezuela and the name of the country of emission
50 céntimosRoundNickel-plated steel4.3 g22 mmSegmented (Plain and Reeded edges)Denomination of the coin, the eight stars and waves representing the patterns of the national flagCoat of Arms of Venezuela and the name of the country of emission
Bs. 1 [es]RoundCopper-Nickel center, Brass ring8.04 g24 mmSmooth 'BCV1'Effigy of the Liberator Simón Bolívar, waves representing the patterns of the national flagDenomination of the coin, the eight stars and the waves representing the patterns of the national flag, the Coat of Arms of Venezuela and the name of the country of emission
In December 2016, it was announced that coins of 10, 50, and 100 bolívares would enter circulation. These three coins would replace the banknotes of the same denominations.[54]
2016 Series
DenominationShapeCompositionWeightDiameterEdgeObverseReverseObverse & Reverse image
10 bolívaresRoundNickel-plated steel3.5 g21.3 mmSmoothEffigy of the Liberator Simón Bolívar, waves representing the patterns of the national flagCoat of Arms of Venezuela and the name of the country of emission
50 bolívaresRoundNickel-plated steel5.3 g23.5 mmSmoothEffigy of the Liberator Simón Bolívar, waves representing the patterns of the national flagCoat of Arms of Venezuela and the name of the country of emission
100 bolívaresRoundNickel-plated steel6.5 g25.5 mmSegmented (Plain and Reeded edges)Effigy of the Liberator Simón Bolívar, waves representing the patterns of the national flagCoat of Arms of Venezuela and the name of the country of emission
Bolívar soberano
Bolívar soberano coins were announced to be produced in denominations of 50 céntimos and 1 bolívar (50,000 bolívares fuertes and 100,000 bolívares fuertes). These two coins are worthless by September 2019.
2018 Series
DenominationShapeCompositionDiameterEdgeObverseReverseObverse imageReverse image
50 céntimosRoundNickel-plated steel22 mmDecoratedEffigy of the Liberator Simón Bolívar, the eight stars of the national flagCoat of Arms of Venezuela, waves representing the patterns of the national flag and the name of the country of emission
1 bolívarRoundCopper-Nickel center, Brass ring24 mm-Effigy of the Liberator Simón Bolívar, the eight stars of the national flagCoat of Arms of Venezuela, waves representing the patterns of the national flag and the name of the country of emission
Banknotes
Bolívar
In 1940, the Banco Central de Venezuela began issuing paper money, introducing by 1945 denominations of 10, 20, 50, 100 and 500 bolívares. 5-bolívar notes were issued between 1966 and 1974, when they were replaced by coins. In 1989, notes for 1, 2 and 5 bolívares were issued.
As inflation took hold, higher denominations of banknotes started being introduced: 1,000 bolívares in 1991, 2,000 and 5,000 bolívares in 1994, and 10,000, 20,000 and 50,000 bolívares in 1998. The first 20,000-bolívar banknotes were made in a green color similar to the one of the 2,000 banknotes, which caused confusion, and new banknotes were made in the new olive green color.
Starting from 2000, banknotes ranging from 5,000 bolívares to 50,000 bolívares were renamed to REPÚBLICA BOLIVARIANA DE VENEZUELA instead of BANCO CENTRAL DE VENEZUELA on the front, after the 1999 constitution was adopted. Moreover, banknotes of 10,000, 20,000 and 50,000 bolívares were updated in April 2006 after the National Assembly approved changes to the coat of arms, which were made official on March 12, 2006.
The following is a list of former Venezuelan bolívar banknotes:
Pre-1998 series banknotes (from various series)
ImageDenominationEmission YearObverseReverse
5 bolívares1968Simón Bolívar and Francisco de MirandaNational Pantheon of Venezuela
10 bolívares1968Simón Bolívar and Antonio Jose de SucreAltar de la Patria, Campo de Carabobo
20 bolívares1971José Antonio PáezAltar de la Patria, Campo de Carabobo
50 bolívares1971Andrés BelloPalace of the Academies
100 bolívares1971Simón BolívarFederal Legislative Palace
500 bolívares1981Simón BolívarA branch of orchids
1,000 bolívares1991Simón BolívarSigning of the Venezuelan Declaration of Independence
2,000 bolívares1994Antonio José de SucreThe Battle of Junín
5,000 bolívares1994Simón Bolívar and his coat of armsA reproduction of the painting El 19 de Abril de 1810 by Juan Lovera
1998 Series
1,000 bolívares1998Simón BolívarA picture of National Pantheon in Caracas
2,000 bolívares1998Andrés BelloA picture of frailejones and a view of the Pico Bolívar
[3][4]10,000 bolívares1998Simón BolívarTeresa Carreño Cultural Complex, Caracas
[5][6]20,000 bolívares1998Simón Rodríguez and the Angel Falls in the backgroundA blue-and-yellow macaw and the Angel Falls
[7][8]50,000 bolívares1998José María VargasCentral University of Venezuela, Caracas
2000 Series
"REPÚBLICA BOLIVARIANA DE VENEZUELA"
[9][10]5,000 bolívares2000Francisco de MirandaPicture of two angelfishes and a panorama of the Guri Dam.
[11][12]10,000 bolívares2000Antonio José de SucreA Marpesia petreus butterfly and the Supreme Tribunal of Justice
[13][14]20,000 bolívares2001Simón Rodríguez and the Angel Falls in the backgroundA blue-and-yellow macaw and the Angel Falls
[15][16]50,000 bolívares2005José María VargasCentral University of Venezuela, Caracas
Bolívar fuerte
2008–2016 ("2007")
New banknotes of the series 2007–2015 with values of 2 to 100 BsF were issued from 20 March 2007 until 5 November 2015 and became legal tender from 1 January 2008 to 20 August 2018. The greater the values, the longer re-issuing occurred. Only the 50 and 100 BsF notes were re-issued in November 2015.
The obverse side is portrait-oriented, with the lower half carrying a portrait, while the reverse side is landscape-oriented, the left two thirds showing an animal in front of its habitat.
Re-issues retain the value-specific motifs, but the printing quality is different. The notes are printed by Casa de la Moneda Venezuela in Venezuela.[55]
2008 Series
DenominationValue in Bs.
(1879-2007)
Emission YearSize (millimeters)ObverseReverseImage
2 bolívares fuertes2,0002007156 × 69Francisco de MirandaOrinoco River Dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) with Coro Dunes in background; Gusano flower
5 bolívares fuertes5,0002007Pedro CamejoGiant armadillo (Priodontes maximus) with the Llanos plains in the background
10 bolívares fuertes10,0002007Cacique GuaicaipuroAmerican harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja) with the Ucaima Falls at Canaima National Park in the background
20 bolívares fuertes20,0002007Luisa Cáceres de ArismendiHawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) with Macanao Mountain in the background
50 bolívares fuertes50,0002007Simón RodríguezSpectacled bear (Tremarctos ornatos) with Laguna Santo Cristo at Sierra Nevada National Park in the background
100 bolívares fuertes100,0002007Simón BolívarRed siskin (Carduelis cucullata) with Cerro El Ávila at El Ávila National Park in the background
2016–17
Play media
Venezuelans lining up at the Banco de Venezuela branch in Chacao to deposit the BsF 100 note after President Maduro withdrew it from circulation.
High inflation, which was a part of Venezuela's economic collapse, caused the bolívar fuerte's value to plummet. The 2- and 5-bolívar notes were no longer found in circulation due to the hyperinflation, but remained legal tender. By December 2016, the 100-bolívar note, Venezuela's largest denomination of currency, was only worth about US$0.23 on the black market.[56]
On 7 December 2016, a new series of banknotes (recolors of the previous notes) in denominations of 500, 1,000, 2,000, 5,000, 10,000, and 20,000 bolívares fuertes was unveiled to the Venezuelan public.[54][56] Days later on 11 December, President Nicolás Maduro who had been ruling by decree wrote into law that the 100 Bs.F would be pulled from circulation within 72 hours because "mafias" were allegedly storing those particular bills to drive inflation.[57] With more than 6 billion 100 Bs.F notes issued consisting of 46% of Venezuela's issued currency, Maduro enacted an exchange for Venezuelan citizens to transfer all 100 Bs.F notes for 100 Bs.F coins while also blocking international travel to prevent the return of the bolívares that were supposedly stockpiled.[57][58] The government justified the move claiming that the United States was working with crime syndicates to spirit away Venezuela's paper money to warehouses in Europe to cause the fall of the government. The government was thwarting this threat by withdrawing the notes from circulation.[59] On 14 February 2017, Paraguayan authorities uncovered a 30-tonne stash of 50- and 100-bolívar notes totaling 1.5 billion Bs.F on its Brazilian border that had not yet been circulated.[60] According to a United States Department of Defense adviser linked to The Pentagon, the 1.5 billion Bs.F was printed by Venezuela and destined for Bolivia, since unlike the implied exchange rate of thousands of bolívares fuertes equaling one United States dollar, the exchange rate was approximately 10 bolívares fuertes per dollar, making the value of the stash 419 times stronger, from US$358,000 to US$150 million.[60] The Pentagon adviser further stated that the Venezuelan government tried to send the newly printed notes to be exchanged by the Bolivian government so Bolivia could pay 20% of its debt to Venezuela, and so Venezuela could use the US dollars for its own disposal.[60]
On 3 November 2017, the Banco Central de Venezuela issued a 100,000-bolívar note which is similar to the 100-bolívar note of the 2007 series and the 20,000-bolívar of the 2016 series, but with the denomination spelled out in full instead of adding an additional three zeros to the number 100. This denomination was worth US$2.42 using the unofficial exchange rate at the date of its release.
New banknotes of the 2016–17 series with values of 500 to 100,000 BsF were issued from 7 December 2016 until 20 August 2018, the day when the bolívar soberano was introduced. Notes from 5,000 BsF to 100,000 BsF were recently re-issued in December 2017.
Maduro has announced that after the currency redenomination has carried out on 20 August 2018, these old denominations with a face value of 1,000 bolívares fuertes or higher will circulate in parallel with the new series of bolívar soberano notes and will continue to be used for a limited time.[61] Banknotes with a face value below 1000 bolívares fuertes were withdrawn from circulation and ceased to be legal tender on 20 August 2018. They have to be deposited in local banks.[62][63]
2016-17 Series
DenominationValue in Bs.S
20 Aug - 4 Dec 2018
Emission YearObverseReverse
500 bolívares fuertesnone2016Francisco de MirandaOrinoco River Dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) with Coro Dunes in background; Gusano flower
1,000 bolívares fuertesBs.S 0.012016Pedro CamejoGiant armadillo (Priodontes maximus) with the Llanos plains in the background
2,000 bolívares fuertesBs.S 0.022016Cacique GuaicaipuroAmerican harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja) with the Ucaima Falls at Canaima National Park in the background
5,000 bolívares fuertesBs.S 0.052016Luisa Cáceres de ArismendiHawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) with Macanao Mountain in the background
10,000 bolívares fuertesBs.S 0.102016Simón RodríguezSpectacled bear (Tremarctos ornatos) with Laguna Santo Cristo at Sierra Nevada National Park in the background
20,000 bolívares fuertesBs.S 0.202016Simón BolívarRed siskin (Carduelis cucullata) with Cerro El Ávila at El Ávila National Park in the background
100,000 bolívares fuertesBs.S 12017Simón BolívarRed siskin (Carduelis cucullata) with Cerro El Ávila at El Ávila National Park in the background
2018
By May 2018, the bolívar fuerte's banknotes represented very little value and they had become in short supply.[64] Weighing scales could no longer convert mass to price and receipts could no longer fit the numbers on their paper.[65]
On June 2018, seven months after its release, the value of the 100,000-bolívar note (largest denomination), had its value reduced by 98%, from US$2.42 (in November 2017) to US$0.05, as a result of increasing hyperinflation.
The lower denomination bolívar fuerte banknotes (up to Bs.F 500) were demonetized on 20 August 2018; with the introduction of the bolívar soberano. Higher denominations (Bs. 1,000 and above) remained legal tender during a transition period. On 30 November 2018, it was announced that the remaining denominations of the old currency will be withdrawn from circulation and cease to be legal tender on 5 December 2018.[66]
Bolívar soberano
2018
On 22 March 2018, with a declared state of emergency, a redenomination of the currency was announced.[67] The conversion from bolívar fuerte to bolívar soberano banknotes officially occurred on 20 August 2018, with new denominations of Bs.S 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 500.[68] Four months after entry into circulation, shops and state banks began refusing the Bs.S 2, as its value had significantly declined since the redenomination.[69][70] By November of 2019, except for the Bs.S 500, all notes issued in 2018 were worthless. People now prefer to receive a small candy or a small pack of sugar instead of taking any of the banknotes issued in 2018.[citation needed]
2018 Series
DenominationValue in Bs.FEmission YearObverseReverse
2 bolívares200,0002018Josefa CamejoYellow-crowned amazon parrot (Amazona ochrocephala) with the Morrocoy National Park in the background
5 bolívares500,0002018José Felix Ribas
(portrait by Martín Tovar y Tovar)
Atelopus cruciger with the Henri Pittier National Park in the background
10 bolívares1,000,0002018Rafael UrdanetaGiant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) with the Catatumbo lightning in the background
20 bolívares2,000,0002018Simón RodríguezJaguar (Panthera onca) with the Waraira Repano National Park in the background
50 bolívares5,000,0002018Antonio José de SucreCunaguaro (Leopardus tigrinus) with the Península de Paria National Park in the background
100 bolívares10,000,0002018Ezequiel ZamoraBrown spider monkey (Ateles hybridus) with the Guatopo National Park in the background
200 bolívares20,000,0002018Francisco de MirandaMilitary macaw (Ara militaris) with the Waraira Repano National Park in the background
500 bolívares50,000,0002018Simón BolívarVenezuelan troupial (Icterus icterus) with the Macarao National Park in the background
2019
Further inflation since the soberano redenomination resulted in the creation of Bs.S 10,000, Bs.S 20,000 and Bs.S 50,000 banknotes in June 2019.[71] Not mentioning inflation, the Central Bank of Venezuela said the introduction of the new banknotes would "complement and optimize" the monetary system and that their purpose was to make payment systems "more efficient".[72] On 23 April 2020, the exchange rate per xe.com was 1 USD = 144,697.34 VES; the following day, the rate slid to 1 USD = 171,140.42 VES.
Banknotes with a narrow segmented security thread were printed by Goznak, those with a wider one were printed elsewhere.
2019 Series
ImageDenominationEmission YearObverseReverse
[73]10,000 bolívares2019Simón Bolívar"Mausoleum of the Liberator" Simón Bolívar
[74]20,000 bolívares2019Simón Bolívar"Mausoleum of the Liberator" Simón Bolívar
[75]50,000 bolívares2019Simón Bolívar"Mausoleum of the Liberator" Simón Bolívar
2020
As of December 2020, the highest denomination banknote (Bs.S 50,000) is worth less than US$0.05[76] and the minimum wage is Bs.S 1,200,000 (about US$1) per month.[77] By September 2020, all bolivar soberano banknotes (VES 2 to 500) issued on 20 August 2018 are deemed worthless.[citation needed] Venezuelan officials are planning a new 100,000 note.[78] Meanwhile, as of 16 December 2020, the exchange rate is over 1 million bolivares to one US dollar.[79]
2021
On 5 March 2021, the Central Bank of Venezuela introduced 3 new denominations: Bs.S 200,000, Bs.S 500,000 and Bs.S 1,000,000 which are going to be available to the general public on 8 March 2021.[80] The 1,000,000 bolívares note is only worth US$0.52 at the time of the announcement.[81]
By early April 2021 the exchange rate had become over 2 million bolivares soberanos to one US dollar.[82]
2021 Series
ImageDenominationEmission YearObverseReverse
[83]200,000 bolívares2020Simón Bolívar"Mausoleum of the Liberator" Simón Bolívar
[84]500,000 bolívares2020Simón Bolívar"Mausoleum of the Liberator" Simón Bolívar
[85]1,000,000 bolívares2020Simón BolívarEntrance to the Monument to the Motherland on Carabobo Fields; Battle of Carabobo

Current VES exchange rates
From Google Finance:AUD CAD CHF EUR GBPHKD JPY USD INR
From Yahoo! Finance:AUD CAD CHF EUR GBPHKD JPY USD INR
From XE.com:AUD CAD CHF EUR GBPHKD JPY USD INR
From OANDA:AUD CAD CHF EUR GBPHKD JPY USD INR
From fxtop.com:AUD CAD CHF EUR GBPHKD JPY USD INR
See also
References
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Bibliography
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