en.m.wikipedia.org
World Socialist Web Site
"WSWS" redirects here. For the radio station, see WSWS (FM).
The World Socialist Web Site (WSWS) is an international Trotskyist news site that is the online news and information publication of the International Committee of the Fourth International (ICFI).[2] The WSWS publishes articles and analysis of news and events from around the world, updated daily. The site also includes coverage of the history of working class political and organized labor movements.
World Socialist Web Site
Type of site
News and analysis
HeadquartersOak Park, Michigan
OwnerInternational Committee of the Fourth International
EditorDavid North (editorial board chairman)
URL
www.wsws.org
CommercialNo (supported by donations)
RegistrationNo (Disqus account is required for commenting on articles)
LaunchedFebruary 14, 1998; 23 years ago[1]
Current statusOnline
About
The WSWS was established on February 14, 1998. The site was redesigned on October 22, 2008.[3]
The WSWS supports and helps campaign for the Socialist Equality Parties in elections. The site has no advertisements, except for material from Mehring Books, the ICFI's publishing arm. Instead, it sustains itself through the donations of readers and supporters.[citation needed] David North serves as Chairman of the site's International Editorial Board.[4]
Content
The WSWS publishes articles on politics, finance and economics, culture, police violence, racism, war, media and information technology, corporate power, history, and labor issues. It also regularly reviews films, television and online series, music, art and artists, and books and authors.[citation needed]
The WSWS periodically undertakes focused political campaigns, during which numerous articles, videos, interviews, and perspectives are published on the topic. Campaigns undertaken include defending Julian Assange,[5] Chelsea Manning,[6] and Edward Snowden,[7] civil rights and free speech,[8][9] and the opposition to utility shutoffs and bankruptcy in Detroit.[10][11]
Demotion in Google searches
In July 2017, the WSWS began to oppose new Google search algorithms, which it believes is a form of Google censorship, and claims that the changes are intended to remove "fake news".[12][13] The WSWS has used evidence from SEMrush, an analytics suite for search engine optimization, that showed that several socialist and anti-war news sites had received reduced traffic from Google due to changes in its search algorithm; according to the WSWS, between late April 2017 and the beginning of August 2017, wsws.org Google search traffic fell by 67%.[14][15] Google said that it had not deliberately targeted any particular website;[15] Google VP Ben Gomes wrote that Google had "adjusted [its] signals to help surface more authoritative pages and demote low-quality content."[16] The documentary film-maker John Pilger has offered his support for the website in its response to Google.[17]
References
  1. ^ "This Year in Review: 1998". World Socialist Web Site. International Committee of the Fourth International. Archived from the original on May 20, 2016. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  2. ^ "Keith Jones and the Socialist Alternative – Kingstonist". Kingstonist. April 10, 2010. Archived from the original on October 24, 2017. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  3. ^ "Welcome the redesigned World Socialist Web Site". World Socialist Web Site. ICFI. Archived from the original on November 30, 2008. Retrieved April 18, 2009.
  4. ^ correspondents, Our. "David North speaks in Berlin on the 15th anniversary of the World Socialist Web Site". www.wsws.org. WSWS. Retrieved May 3, 2021.
  5. ^ Mazhar, Fatimah, "World's Most Widely Accessed Socialist Website Defends Edward Snowden", Carbonated.TV, archived from the original on March 5, 2016, retrieved February 20, 2016
  6. ^ Reporter, Ben Rosenfeld Daily Staff. "IYSSE members discuss Manning imprisonment following rally". The Michigan Daily. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  7. ^ "WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange rape allegations: What's behind them?". Hot Topics. September 1, 2010. Archived from the original on October 24, 2017. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  8. ^ Elliott, Tim (May 5, 2010). "Hunt was up against civil rights arguments". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on October 23, 2017. Retrieved October 2, 2017.
  9. ^ ""Fake news" or free speech: Is Google cracking down on left media?". Salon. October 18, 2017. Archived from the original on October 24, 2017. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  10. ^ "IYSSE facilitates campus discussion about socialism". The South End. Archived from the original on October 23, 2017. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  11. ^ "Socialists to protest in defense of Detroit's DIA Friday, day after EM Orr tells business leaders he was once 'somewhat of a Socialist' himself". MLive.com. Archived from the original on October 23, 2017. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  12. ^ "Google Censors Block Access to CounterPunch and Other Progressive Sites". www.counterpunch.org. August 9, 2017. Archived from the original on August 14, 2017. Retrieved August 14, 2017.
  13. ^ "Is "Fake News" Scare Being Used to Stifle Dissent? | Accuracy.Org". Institute for Public Accuracy. Archived from the original on October 23, 2017. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  14. ^ "The Dawn of an Orwellian Future". Consortiumnews. July 28, 2017. Archived from the original on October 24, 2017. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  15. ^ a b Wakabayashi, Daisuke (September 26, 2017). "As Google Fights Fake News, Voices on the Margins Raise Alarm". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 13, 2018. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  16. ^ Sheffield, Matthew (October 18, 2017). "'Fake news' or free speech: Is Google cracking down on left media?". Salon. Archived from the original on January 13, 2018. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
  17. ^ "Documentarian John Pilger issues statement of support for January 16 webinar, 'Organizing resistance to Internet censorship'website=World Socialist Web Site". ICFI. January 11, 2018. Archived from the original on January 11, 2018. Retrieved January 13, 2018.
External links
Last edited on 3 May 2021, at 22:06
Content is available under CC BY-SA 3.0 unless otherwise noted.
Privacy policy
Terms of Use
Desktop
HomeRandomNearbyLog inSettingsDonateAbout WikipediaDisclaimers
LanguageWatchEdit