Dreams
imaginary events seen in the mind while sleeping
(Redirected from Dream)
A dream is a succession of images, ideas, emotions, and sensations that usually occur involuntarily in the mind during certain stages of sleep. The content and purpose of dreams are not fully understood, though they have been a topic of scientific, philosophical and religious interest throughout recorded history. Dream interpretation is the attempt at drawing meaning from dreams and searching for an underlying message. The scientific study of dreams is called oneirology and also sometimes they happen to come true sometimes it's a warning or message about something
Quotes
Never the spirit was born, the spirit shall cease to be never. Never was time it was not, end and beginning are dreams.
~ Bhagavad Gita
Life, what is it but a dream?
~ Lewis Carroll

We are now synergetically forced to conclude that all phenomena are metaphysical; wherefore, as many have long suspected—like it or not—"life is but a dream".
~ Buckminster Fuller
The dreamer dies, but never dies the dream
Say never more
That dreams are fragile things. What else endures
Of all this broken world save only dreams!
~ Dana Burnet
Your old men shall dream dreams, your young men shall see visions.
~ The Bible, Book of Joel, 2,28
I can but entreat you to remember it is only by preserving faith in human dreams that we may, after all, perhaps some day make them come true.
~ James Branch Cabell
A poet should leave traces of his passage, not proofs. Traces alone engender dreams.
~ René Char
The center of every man's existence is a dream.
~ G. K. Chesterton
If a man could pass through Paradise in a dream, and have a flower presented to him as a pledge that his soul had really been there, and if he found that flower in his hand when he awake — Aye, what then?
~ Coleridge
Don't ever let someone tell you, you can't do something. Not even me. You got a dream, you got to protect it.
~ Steve Conrad
Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than with the imagination being awake?
~ Leonardo da Vinci
Somehow, I can't believe that there are any heights that can't be scaled by a man who knows the secret of making dreams come true.
~ Walt Disney
All our dreams can come true — if we have the courage to pursue them.
~ Walt Disney
Dreams, as we all know, are very queer things: some parts are presented with appalling vividness, with details worked up with the elaborate finish of jewellery, while others one gallops through, as it were, without noticing them at all...
~ Fyodor Dostoevsky
They tease me now, telling me it was only a dream. But does it matter whether it was a dream or reality, if the dream made known to me the truth? ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky
The actual forms and images of my dream, that is, the very ones I really saw at the very time of my dream, were filled with such harmony, were so lovely and enchanting and were so actual, that on awakening I was, of course, incapable of clothing them in our poor language... ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky
How it could come to pass I do not know, but I remember it clearly. The dream embraced thousands of years and left in me only a sense of the whole. ~ Fyodor Dostoevsky
You can live in your dreams] but only if you are worthy of them. ~ Harlan Ellison
ALL THIS IS A DREAM. ~ Michael Faraday
To accomplish great things we must not only act, but also dream; not only plan, but also believe.~ Anatole France
Both dreams and myths are important communications from ourselves to ourselves. ~ Erich Fromm
Always believe in your dreams, because if you don't, you'll still have hope. ~ Mahatma Gandhi
When a dream is born in you
With a sudden clamorous pain,
When you know the dream is true
And lovely, with no flaw nor stain,
O then, be careful, or with sudden clutch
You'll hurt the delicate thing you prize so much. ~ Robert Graves
I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past. ~ Thomas Jefferson
The dream is the small hidden door in the deepest and most intimate sanctum of the soul, which opens to that primeval cosmic night that was soul long before there was conscious ego and will be soul far beyond what a conscious ego could ever reach. ~ Carl Jung
I chose to dream and act on my dreams, following the example that my father taught. To live with this dream may be crazy, it may be foolish, but to live without it would be a nightmare. ~ Yolanda King
Yes, you can kill the dreamer. Absolutely, you can kill the dreamer. But you cannot kill the dream. ~ Samuel Kyles
Is this is a dream? O, if it be a dream,
Let me sleep on, and do not wake me yet! ~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The king lay down not to sleep, he lay down to dream. ~ Lugalbanda in the Mountain Cave
The value of dreams, like … divinations, is not that they give a specific answer, but that they open up new areas of psychic reality, shake us out of our customary ruts, and throw light on a new segment of our lives.~ Rollo May
They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night. ~ Edgar Allan Poe
All that we see or seem
Is but a dream within a dream.~ Edgar Allan Poe
Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before.~ Edgar Allan Poe
I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was.~ Shakespeare
Dreams are the touchstones of our characters. ~ Thoreau
So many of our dreams at first seem impossible, then they seem improbable, and then, when we summon the will, they soon become inevitable. ~ Christopher Reeve
The greatest man of action is he who is the greatest, and a life-long, dreamer. [...] A democracy should not let its dreamers perish. They are its life, its guaranty against decay. ~ Louis Sullivan
Dream is akin to aspiration. And aspiration is a kind of divination of an enigmatic vision. ~ Leo Strauss
We grow great by dreams. ~ Woodrow Wilson
I have spread my dreams beneath your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams. ~ William Butler Yeats
During our dreams we do not know we are dreaming. We may even dream of interpreting a dream. Only on waking do we know it was a dream. Only after the great awakening will we realize that this is the great dream. ~ Zhuangzi
After ten thousand generations there may be a great sage who will be able to explain it, a trivial interval equivalent to the passage from morning to night. ~ Zhuangzi
Still enveloped in a blanket of dreams
my life continued to lie still, pretending as if
it was in a deep slumber.
~ Suman Pokhrel
Under each arm he carries an umbrella; one of them, with pictures on the inside, he spreads over the good children, and then they dream the most beautiful stories the whole night. But the other umbrella has no pictures, and this he holds over the naughty children so that they sleep heavily, and wake in the morning without having dreamed at all.
Hans Christian Andersen Ole Lukøje
Follow your dreams, not your boyfriends.
Gillian Anderson, as she wrote in a letter to her teenage self — from Dear Me: More Letters To My Sixteen-Year-Old Self, edited by Joseph Galliano. (June 19, 2011)
Álomban és szerelemben nincs lehetetlenség.
In dreams and in love there are no impossibilities.
János Arany, as quoted in Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign Sources (1893) by James Wood, p. 11.
Courage is the magic that turns dreams into reality.
Aster and Richter Abend in Tales of Symphonia: Dawn of the New World.
Sweet sleep be with us, one and all!
And if upon its stillness fall
The visions of a busy brain,
We'll have our pleasure o'er again,
To warm the heart, to charm the sight,
Gay dreams to all! good night, good night.
Joanna Baillie, The Phantom, Song (1836).
Hypnotic dreams have long been a method by which hypnosis is utilized in psychotherapy; however, the research on their characteristics in comparison to nocturnal dreams is sparse. Physiological correlates of hypnotic dreams have been clearly established as resembling those of a relaxed waking state much more closely than they resemble any stage of sleep (Brady & Rosner, 1966; Tart, 1964), the one exception being the observation of rapid eye movements (REM) during some hypnotic dreams (Brady & Rosner, 1966; Schiff, Bunney, & Freedman, 1961).
The content of hypnotic dreams has been less methodically tested. Some psychotherapists describe using hypnotic dreams in the same manner they would nocturnal dreams and believe their content to be virtually identical (Fromm, 1965; Sacerdote, 1968; Schneck, 1953). Other authors describe having observed differences between two categories (Gill & Brenman, 1959; Tart, 1966). The most empirical articles to date have indicated some possible differences, such as hypnotic dreams being shorter, having fewer characters,having more "Alice-in-Wonderland" size distortions (Hilgard & Nowlis, 1972), and being less vivid, less fearful, and more plausible (Spanos & Ham, 1975). Tart (1966) found a correlation between depth of trance and vividness of hypnotic dreams. Some authors such as Barber (1962) and Walker (1974) assert that hypnotic dream content is identical to that of waking fantasy and quite different from nocturnal dreams. Obviously there are many contradictions in the literature of this area.
Barrett, D. L. (1979). "The Hypnotic Dream: Its Content in Comparison to Nocturnal Dreams and Waking Fantasy". Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 88: 584–591. doi:10.1037/0021-843x.88.5.584. p.584
Some of my youthful readers are developing wonderful imaginations. This pleases me. Imagination has brought mankind through the Dark Ages to its present state of civilization. Imagination led Columbus to discover America. Imagination led Franklin to discover electricity. Imagination has given us the steam engine, the telephone, the talking-machine, and the automobile, for these things had to be dreamed of before they became realities. So I believe that dreams — day dreams, you know, with your eyes wide open and your brain machinery whizzing — are likely to lead to the betterment of the world. The imaginative child will become the imaginative man or woman most apt to create, to invent, and therefore to foster civilization. A prominent educator tells me that fairy tales are of untold value in developing imagination in the young. I believe it.
L. Frank Baum, Introduction to The Lost Princess of Oz (1917).
Perhaps you have heard the story of Christopher Wren, one of the greatest of English architects, who walked one day unrecognized among the men who were at work upon the building of St. Paul's cathedral in London which he had designed. "What are you doing?" he inquired of one of the workmen, and the man replied, "I am cutting a piece of stone." As he went on he put the same question to another man, and the man replied, "I am earning five shillings twopence a day." And to a third man he addressed the same inquiry and the man answered, "I am helping Sir Christopher Wren build a beautiful cathedral." That man had vision. He could see beyond the cutting of the stone, beyond the earning of his daily wage, to the creation of a work of art—the building of a great cathedral. And in your life it is important for you to strive to attain a vision of the larger whole.
Attributed to Louise Bush-Brown, director of the Pennsylvania School of Horticulture for Women. Reported in as unverified in Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations (1989).
And it shall come to pass afterward, that I will pour out my spirit upon all flesh; and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall dream dreams, your young men shall see visions.
The Bible, Book of Joel, chapter 2, verse 28.
Trapped dreams must die.
James Branch Cabell, The Certain Hour (1916), "To Robert Gamble Cabell II: In Dedication of The Certain Hour'".
I was born, I think, with the desire to make beautiful books — brave books that would preserve the glories of the Dream untarnished, and would re-create them for battered people, and re-awaken joy and magnanimity.
James Branch Cabell, The Certain Hour (1916), "Auctorial Induction".
The Dream, as I now know, is not best served by making parodies of it, and it does not greatly matter after all whether a book be an epic or a directory. What really matters is that there is so much faith and love and kindliness which we can share with and provoke in others, and that by cleanly, simple, generous living we approach perfection in the highest and most lovely of all arts. . . . But you, I think, have always comprehended this.
James Branch Cabell, The Certain Hour (1916), "Auctorial Induction".
I can but entreat you to remember it is only by preserving faith in human dreams that we may, after all, perhaps some day make them come true.
James Branch Cabell, The Cream of the Jest : A Comedy of Evasions (1917) "Richard Fentnor Harroby" in Ch. 1 : Pallation of the Gambit.
With the passage of time, whatever a man had done, whether for good or evil, with the man's bodily organs, left the man's parish unaffected: only a man's thoughts and dreams could outlive him, in any serious sense, and these might survive with perhaps augmenting influence: so that Kennaston had come to think artistic creation in words — since marble and canvas inevitably perished — was the one, possibly, worth-while employment of human life. But here was a crude corporal deed which bluntly destroyed thoughts, and annihilated dreams by wholesale. To Kennaston this seemed the one real tragedy that could be staged on earth....
James Branch Cabell, The Cream of the Jest (1917) "Richard Fentnor Harroby" in Ch. 24 : Deals with Pen Scratches.
Man alone of animals plays the ape to his dreams.
James Branch Cabell, The Silver Stallion : A Comedy of Redemption (1926), Manuel, in Book Four : Coth at Porutsa, Chapter XXV : Last Obligation upon Manuel
People must have both their dreams and their dinners in this world, and when we go out of it we must take what we find. That is all.
James Branch Cabell, The Silver Stallion : A Comedy of Redemption (1926), Niafer, in Book Ten : At Manuel's Tomb, Chapter LXIX : Economics of Jurgen.
Freud very rightly brought his critical faculties to bear upon the dream. It is, in fact, inadmissible that this considerable portion of psychic activity (since, at least from man’s birth until his death, thought offers no solution of continuity, the sum of the moments of the dream, from the point of view of time, and taking into consideration only the time of pure dreaming, that is the dreams of sleep, is not inferior to the sum of the moments of reality, or, to be more precisely limiting, the moments of waking) has still today been so grossly neglected.
André Breton, initiator of French Surrealism, from the first Manifesto of Surrealism - 1924; The Abridged Dictionary of Surrealism, reprinted in Marguerite Bonnet, ed. (1988). Oeuvres complètes, 1:328. Paris: Éditions Gallimard
I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas; they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.
Emily Brontë, Catherine Earnshaw (Ch. IX). Wuthering Heights (1847).
The dreamer dies, but never dies the dream,
Though Death shall call the whirlwind to his aid,
Enlist men’s passions, trick their hearts with hate,
Still shall the Vision live! Say never more
That dreams are fragile things. What else endures
Of all this broken world save only dreams!
Dana Burnet, "Who Dreams Shall Live", in Poems (1915), p. 209, lines 11–16.
His early dreams of good outstripp'd the truth,
And troubled manhood follow'd baffled youth.
Byron, Lara, Canto 18.
It's called the American dream because you have to be asleep to believe it.
George Carlin, from his "Life Is Worth Losing" stand-up routine (2005)
Un poète doit laisser des traces de son passage, non des preuves. Seules les traces font rêver.
A poet should leave traces of his passage, not proofs. Traces alone engender dreams.
René Char, as quoted in The French-American Review (1976) by Texas Christian University, p. 132.
The center of every man's existence is a dream. Death, disease, insanity, are merely material accidents, like a toothache or a twisted ankle. That these brutal forces always besiege and often capture the citadel does not prove that they are the citadel.
G. K. Chesterton, Twelve Types (1903) "Sir Walter Scott".
I have become increasingly convinced that some of the popular methods presumed to discover what is in the unconscious cannot be counted upon as reliable methods of obtaining evidence. They often involve the use of symbolism and analogy in such a way that the interpreter can find virtually anything that he is looking for. Freud, for instance, from a simple dream reported by a man in his middle twenties [i.e., Sergei Pankejeff ] as having occurred at 4 years of age drew remarkable conclusions. The 4-year-old boy dreamed of seeing six or seven white wolves sitting in a tree. Freud interpreted the dream in such a way as to convince himself that the patient at 18 months of age had been shocked by seeing his parents have intercourse three times in succession and that this played a major part in the extreme fear of being castrated by his father which Freud ascribed to him at 4 years of age. No objective evidence was ever offered to support this conclusion. Nor was actual fear of castration ever made to emerge into the light of consciousness despite years of analysis.
Hervey Cleckley, The Mask of Sanity, 1941, fifth edition 1976, ISBN 0-9621519-0-4
If a man could pass through Paradise in a dream, and have a flower presented to him as a pledge that his soul had really been there, and if he found that flower in his hand when he awake — Aye, what then?
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, "Anima Poetæ : From the Unpublished Note-books of Samuel Taylor Coleridge" (1895) edited by Ernest Hartley Coleridge, p. 282.
Don't ever let someone tell you, you can't do something. Not even me. You got a dream, you got to protect it. People can't do something themselves, they want to tell you you can't do it. You want something, go get it. Period.
Steve Conrad, The Pursuit of Happyness (2006) based on the book by Chris Gardner
Dream after dream ensues;
And still they dream that they shall still succeed;
And still are disappointed.
William Cowper, The Task (1785), Book III, line 127.
I dream of vampires. I dream of god. I dream of no vampires. I dream of no god. I dream of nothing. And yet that too is still my dream.
Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves (2000), p. 544.
Why does the eye see a thing more clearly in dreams than with the imagination being awake?
Leonardo da Vinci, The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci (1938), XIX Philosophical Maxims. Morals. Polemics and Speculations., as translated by Edward MacCurdy.
Men will seem to see new destructions in the sky. The flames that fall from it will seem to rise in it and to fly from it with terror. They will hear every kind of animals speak in human language. They will instantaneously run in person in various parts of the world, without motion. They will see the greatest splendour in the midst of darkness. O! marvel of the human race! What madness has led you thus! You will speak with animals of every species and they with you in human speech. You will see yourself fall from great heights without any harm and torrents will accompany you, and will mingle with their rapid course.
Leonardo da Vinci, The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci (1938), XX Humorous Writings, as translated by Edward MacCurdy.
Beyond a doubt truth bears the same relation to falsehood as light to darkness; and this truth is in itself so excellent that, even when it dwells on humble and lowly matters, it is still infinitely above uncertainty and lies, disguised in high and lofty discourses; because in our minds, even if lying should be their fifth element, this does not prevent that the truth of things is the chief nutriment of superior intellects, though not of wandering wits. But you who live in dreams are better pleased by the sophistical reasons and frauds of wits in great and uncertain things, than by those reasons which are certain and natural and not so far above us.
Leonardo da Vinci, The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci (1938), XIX Philosophical Maxims. Morals. Polemics and Speculations., as translated by Edward MacCurdy.
'I say to my students: We all spend a big chunk of our lives dreaming—we obviously need to do it for some reason.'
Drew Dawson, Director, Centre for Sleep Research, UNISA In Williams, Daniel (April 5, 2007). "While you were sleeping". Time magazine. Archived from the original on October 3, 2011. Retrieved October 9, 2011.
Somehow, I can't believe that there are any heights that can't be scaled by a man who knows the secret of making dreams come true. The special secret it seems to me is summarized in four C's. They are Curiosity, Courage, Confidence and Constancy. And the greatest of all is Confidence. When you believe in a thing, believe in it all the way, implicitly and unquestionably.
Walt Disney, as quoted in Perceive This! : How to Get Everything You Want Out of Life by Changing Your Perceptions (2004) by Kevin A. Martin, Ch. 9, No Bar Too High!, p. 64.
Dreams, as we all know, are very queer things: some parts are presented with appalling vividness, with details worked up with the elaborate finish of jewellery, while others one gallops through, as it were, without noticing them at all, as, for instance, through space and time. Dreams seem to be spurred on not by reason but by desire, not by the head but by the heart, and yet what complicated tricks my reason has played sometimes in dreams, what utterly incomprehensible things happen to it!
Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877), II.
Yes, I dreamed a dream, my dream of the third of November. They tease me now, telling me it was only a dream. But does it matter whether it was a dream or reality, if the dream made known to me the truth? If once one has recognized the truth and seen it, you know that it is the truth and that there is no other and there cannot be, whether you are asleep or awake. Let it be a dream, so be it, but that real life of which you make so much I had meant to extinguish by suicide, and my dream, my dream — oh, it revealed to me a different life, renewed, grand and full of power!
Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877), II.
In dreams you sometimes fall from a height, or are stabbed, or beaten, but you never feel pain unless, perhaps, you really bruise yourself against the bedstead, then you feel pain and almost always wake up from it. It was the same in my dream. I did not feel any pain, but it seemed as though with my shot everything within me was shaken and everything was suddenly dimmed, and it grew horribly black around me. I seemed to be blinded, and it benumbed, and I was lying on something hard, stretched on my back; I saw nothing, and could not make the slightest movement.
Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877), III.
Oh, everyone laughs in my face now, and assures me that one cannot dream of such details as I am telling now, that I only dreamed or felt one sensation that arose in my heart in delirium and made up the details myself when I woke up. And when I told them that perhaps it really was so, my God, how they shouted with laughter in my face, and what mirth I caused! Oh, yes, of course I was overcome by the mere sensation of my dream, and that was all that was preserved in my cruelly wounded heart; but the actual forms and images of my dream, that is, the very ones I really saw at the very time of my dream, were filled with such harmony, were so lovely and enchanting and were so actual, that on awakening I was, of course, incapable of clothing them in our poor language, so that they were bound to become blurred in my mind; and so perhaps I really was forced afterwards to make up the details, and so of course to distort them in my passionate desire to convey some at least of them as quickly as I could. But on the other hand, how can I help believing that it was all true? It was perhaps a thousand times brighter, happier and more joyful than I describe it. Granted that I dreamed it, yet it must have been real. You know, I will tell you a secret: perhaps it was not a dream at all!
Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877), IV.
How it could come to pass I do not know, but I remember it clearly. The dream embraced thousands of years and left in me only a sense of the whole. I only know that I was the cause of their sin and downfall. Like a vile trichina, like a germ of the plague infecting whole kingdoms, so I contaminated all this earth, so happy and sinless before my coming. They learnt to lie, grew fond of lying, and discovered the charm of falsehood.
Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877), V.
A dream! What is a dream? And is not our life a dream? I will say more. Suppose that this paradise will never come to pass (that I understand), yet I shall go on preaching it. And yet how simple it is: in one day, in one hour everything could be arranged at once! The chief thing is to love others like yourself, that's the chief thing, and that's everything; nothing else is wanted — you will find out at once how to arrange it all. And yet it's an old truth which has been told and retold a billion times — but it has not formed part of our lives! The consciousness of life is higher than life, the knowledge of the laws of happiness is higher than happiness — that is what one must contend against. And I shall. If only everyone wants it, it can be arranged at once.
Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877), V.
A dream! What is a dream? And is not our life a dream? I will say more. Suppose that this paradise will never come to pass (that I understand), yet I shall go on preaching it. And yet how simple it is: in one day, in one hour everything could be arranged at once! The chief thing is to love others like yourself, that's the chief thing, and that's everything; nothing else is wanted — you will find out at once how to arrange it all. And yet it's an old truth which has been told and retold a billion times — but it has not formed part of our lives! The consciousness of life is higher than life, the knowledge of the laws of happiness is higher than happiness — that is what one must contend against. And I shall. If only everyone wants it, it can be arranged at once.
Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877), V.
You can live in your dreams, but only if you are worthy of them.
Harlan Ellison , "Delusion for a Dragon Slayer" (1966).
They are not long, the days of wine and roses:
Out of a misty dream
Our path emerges for a while, then closes
Within a dream.
Ernest Dowson, "They are not long, the weeping and the laughter," stanza 2, The Poems and Prose of Ernest Dowson (1919), p. 22.
Nenne dich nicht arm, weil deine Träume nicht in Erfüllung gegangen sind; wirklich arm ist nur der, der nicht geträumt hat.
The seventeenth-century Iroquois, as described by the Jesuit missionaries, practiced a dream psychotherapy that was remarkably similar to Freud's discoveries two hundred years later. The Iroquois recognized the existence of an unconscious, the force of unconscious desires, the way in which the conscious mind attempts to repress unpleasant thoughts, the emergence of unpleasant thoughts in dreams, and the mental and physical (psychosomatic) illnesses that may be caused by the frustration of unconscious desires. The Iroquois knew that their dreams did not deal in facts but rather in symbols. ...And one of the techniques employed by the Iroquois seers to uncover the latent meanings behind a dream was free association... The Iroquois faith in dreams... is only somewhat diminished after more than three hundred years. ...The conclusions are inevitable: Had Freud not discovered psychotherapy, then someone else would have.
Peter Farb, Man's Rise to Civilization (1968)
You have to believe we are magic, nothin' can stand in our way
You have to believe we are magic, don't let your aim ever stray
And if all your hopes survive, destiny will arrive
I'll bring all your dreams alive, for you.
John Farrar in "Magic", from the film Xanadu (1980).
People say that your dreams are the only things that save ya... Come on baby in our dreams, we can live our misbehaviors
Arcade Fire, "Rebellion (Lies)", Funeral (2004).
Pour accomplir de grandes choses il ne suffit pas d'agir il faut rêver; il ne suffit pas de calculer, il faut croire.
If dreaming was selected for because of its adaptive function, the general content of dreams should certainly reflect this, and consist of situations that allow the rehearsal of scenarios that ultimately lead toward increased fitness. This is exactly what is seen, with studies indicating that dream content is biased toward negative elements reflecting threat, as opposed to positive elements. Data collected from over 500 dream reports by Hall and Van de Castle (1966) indicate that about 80% contained negative emotions, while only about 20% contained positive emotions. These negative dreams are also disproportionably likely to contain threatening elements such as animals and male strangers in threatening encounters. The evidence points towards the overrepresentation of threatening events in dreams, which should not occur if dream content is random. Through appropriating and learning to deal with these threats in dreams, it is proposed here that an animal could increase its overall evolutionary fitness.
Franklin, M; Zyphur, M (2005). "The role of dreams in the evolution of the human mind" (PDF). Evolutionary Psychology. 3: Archived (PDF) from the original on 2011-08-11, p.66
Another example of a skill that has arguably played a pivotal role in other functional aspects of the human intellect and could serve to be shaped by dreaming is that of interpretation. As discussed by Bogdan (1997, p.108), “…key advances in interpretation, such as the recognition of belief, were accelerated by increased opportunities to interact with or manipulate subjects and slowed down by a lack of such opportunities.” As such, via teasing, play, mental rehearsal/imagery, or dreaming, the individual is given the opportunity to utilize successful strategies in dealing with these situations and further develop interpretive skills. In fact, studies of children’s dream-reports indicate that their dreams more often contain family members and close friends than adults’ dreams (Hobson, 1988), possibly due to the fact that it is more important for younger children to be practicing close interpersonal skills than it is for adults.
Ibid, p.69-70
The latent content of dreams consists of:
1. Dynamically unconscious wishes (id impulses) prevented by the censorship (the defences of the ego) from reaching consciousness or even the system preconscious during waking life. Several wishes may be present in the same dream:
'Dreams frequently seem to have more than one meaning. Not only, as our examples have shown, may they include several wishfulfilments one alongside the other; but a succession of meanings or wish-fulfilments may be superimposed on one another, the bottom one being the fulfilment of a wish dating from earliest childhood. And here again the question arises whether it might not be more correct to assert that this occurs "invariably" rather than "frequently".
(1900a) The Interpertation of Dreams, S.E., Vol. 4, p. 219; as quoted in Nagera, Humberto, ed. (2014) [1969]. "Latent dream-content (pp. 31ff.)".
Basic Psychoanalytic Concepts on the Theory of Dreams. Abingdon-on-Thames: Routledge. ISBN 1-31767048-5. ISBN 978-1-317-67048-3., p.31
The majority of these impulses are sexual in nature, and most of them stem from the infantile period of life: 'a dream might be described as a substitute for an infantile scene modified by being trnsferred on to a recent experience. The infantile scene is unable to bring about its own revival and has to be content with returning as a dream.'
1900a) The Interpertation of Dreams, S.E., Vol. 5, p. 546; as quoted in Nagera, Humberto, ed. (2014) [1969]. "Latent dream-content (pp. 31ff.)".
Basic Psychoanalytic Concepts on the Theory of Dreams. Abingdon-on-Thames: Routledge. ISBN 1-31767048-5. ISBN 978-1-317-67048-3., p.31
The interpretation of dreams is the royal road to a knowledge of the unconscious activities of the mind.
Both dreams and myths are important communications from ourselves to ourselves. If we do not understand the language in which they are written, we miss a great deal of what we know and tell ourselves in those hours when we are not busy manipulating the outside world.
Erich Fromm, as quoted in The New York Times (5 January 1964).
Science's self-assumed responsibility has been self-limited to disclosure to society only of the separate, supposedly physical (because separately weighable) atomic component isolations data. Synergetic integrity would require the scientists to announce that in reality what had been identified heretofore as physical is entirely metaphysical—because synergetically weightless. Metaphysical has been science's designation for all weightless phenomena such as thought. But science has made no experimental finding of any phenomena that can be described as a solid, or as continuous, or as a straight surface plane, or as a straight line, or as infinite anything. We are now synergetically forced to conclude that all phenomena are metaphysical; wherefore, as many have long suspected—like it or not—"life is but a dream".
Buckminster Fuller, Synergetics (Introduction: The Wellspring of Reality) 1975
Did I dream this belief
Or did I believe this dream?
Now I will find relief
I grieve
Peter Gabriel I Grieve
Always believe in your dreams, because if you don't, you'll still have hope.
Mahatma Gandhi Young India (23 March 1924).
Life being what it is, one dreams of revenge
Paul Gauguin, Avant et Après (1903), from Paul Gauguin's Intimate Journals, trans. (1923) Van Wyck Brooks [Dover, 1997, ISBN 0-486-29441-2], p. 2.
Dreams, something like prophecy, are the offspring of imaginations and comparisons which we may form whilst awake.
Tales and Maxims from the Midrash by Rev. Samuel Rapaport, Genesis Rabbah 17, (1907), p. 69
Dreams neither injure nor benefit: they are vain.
Ibid., Genesis Rabbah 68, p.83
A dream towards morning is likely to be fulfilled.
Ibid., Genesis Rabbah 89, p.86
When a dream is born in you
With a sudden clamorous pain,
When you know the dream is true
And lovely, with no flaw nor stain,
O then, be careful, or with sudden clutch
You'll hurt the delicate thing you prize so much.
Robert Graves, Fairies and Fusiliers (1917), "A Pinch of Salt".
The pain was maddening. You should pray to God when you're dying, if you can pray when you're in agony. In my dream I didn't pray to God, I thought of Roger and how dearly I loved him. The pain of those wicked flames was not half so bad as the pain I felt when I knew he was dead. I felt suddenly glad to be dying. I didn't know when you were burnt to death you'd bleed. I thought the blood would all dry up in the terrible heat. But I was bleeding heavily. The blood was dripping and hissing in the flames. I wished I had enough blood to put the flames out. The worst part was my eyes. I hate the thought of gong blind. It's bad enough when I'm awake but in dreams you can't shake the thoughts away. They remain. In this dream I was going blind. I tried to close my eyelids but I couldn't. They must have been burnt off, and now those flames were going to pluck my eyes out with their evil fingers, I didn't want to go blind. The flames weren't so cruel after all. They began to feel cold. Icy cold. It occurred to me that I wasn't burning to death but freezing to death.
Arthur Guirdham in The Cathars and Reincarnation, p. 89.
Many similarities are noted between the process of dreaming and the process of psychotherapy as usually practiced in the many dynamic psychotherapies deriving from Freud's work. Dreaming and psychotherapy both involve freeing of associations, prevention of acting out, and making psychological connections in many different senses, all occurring in a safe environment. In REM sleep, safety is provided by the bed and by muscular paralysis; in therapy, by the relationship with the therapist (alliance), the setting, and the rules of conduct. The similarity can be seen particularly clearly in the period following an acute trauma. Dreaming and therapy each give the patient a safe place in which to make connections between the trauma and other relevant memories, themes, and issues so that the trauma and its associated disturbing affect are eventually integrated into the patient's life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Hartmann, E. "Making connections in a safe place: Is dreaming psychotherapy?". Dreaming. 5 (4): 213–228. doi:10.1037/h0094437. (1995).
Dream and deed are not as different as many think. All the deeds of men are dreams at first, and become dreams in the end.
Theodor Herzl as quoted in The Israelis : Founders and Sons (1971) by Amos Elon, p. 57
I differ from Freud in that I think that most dreams are neither obscure nor bowdlerized, but rather that they are transparent and unedited. They reveal clearly meaningful undisguised and often highly conflictual themes worthy of note by the dreamer (and any interpretive assistant). My position echoes Jung's notion of dreams as transparently meaningful and does away with any distinction between manifest and latent content.
J. Allan Hobson, in The Dreaming Brain : How the brain creates both the sense and nonsense of dreams (1988)
Dreaming has fascinated and mystified humankind for ages: the bizarre and evanescent qualities of dreams have invited boundless speculation about their origin, meaning and purpose. For most of the twentieth century, scientific dream theories were mainly psychological. Since the discovery of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the neural underpinnings of dreaming have become increasingly well understood, and it is now possible to complement the details of these brain mechanisms with a theory of consciousness that is derived from the study of dreaming. The theory advanced here emphasizes data that suggest that REM sleep may constitute a protoconscious state, providing a virtual reality model of the world that is of functional use to the development and maintenance of waking consciousness.
Hobson, J.A. (2009). "REM sleep and dreaming: towards a theory of protoconsciousness". Nature Reviews Neuroscience. 10 (11): 803–813. doi:10.1038/nrn2716. PMID 19794431. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19794431
It is important to state here -- though evidence will be considered in detail later on -- that all three women have either had "dreams" or normal recollections of having been shown, at later times, tiny offspring whose appearance suggests they are something other than completely human . . . that they are in fact hybrids, partly human and partly what we must call, for want of a better term, alien. it is unthinkable and unbelievable -- yet the evidence points in that direction. An ongoing and systematic breeding experiment must be considered one of the central purposes of UFO abductions.
Budd Hopkins, in Intruders: The Incredible Visitations at Copley Woods , p. 130
Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly.
Langston Hughes, in "Dreams" in the anthology Golden Slippers : An Anthology of Negro Poetry for Young Readers (1941), edited by Arna Bontemps.
What happens to a dream deferred?
Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore —
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over —
like a syrupy sweet?
Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.
Or does it explode?
Langston Hughes, in "Harlem" in Montage of a Dream Deferred (1951).
Joined by his friend Zero, Mega Man X gazes out over the sea. Sigma has once again been destroyed, but X wonders if the fighting will truly end. Was Dr. Light's dream of a world in which Reploids and humans lived together in peace merely a dream? The price of peace is often high, X thinks to himself. Who or what must be sacrificed for it to become a reality? And when the time comes, will he be able to do it? The future holds the answers or...
Keiji Inafune, Sho Tsuge and Yoshihisa Tsuda Mega Man X2
I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past, — so good night!
Thomas Jefferson, Letter to John Adams (1 August 1816).
ALL THIS IS A DREAM. Still examine it by a few experiments. Nothing is too wonderful to be true, if it be consistent with the laws of nature; and in such things as these experiment is the best test of such consistency.
Michael Faraday, in his laboratory journal entry #10,040 (19 March 1849); published in The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870) Vol. II, edited by Henry Bence Jones, p. 253. This has sometimes been quoted partially as "Nothing is too wonderful to be true".
The dream is the small hidden door in the deepest and most intimate sanctum of the soul, which opens to that primeval cosmicnight that was soul long before there was conscious ego and will be soul far beyond what a conscious ego could ever reach.
Carl Jung, The Meaning of Psychology for Modern Man (1934).
We are so captivated by and entangled in our subjective consciousness that we have forgotten the age-old fact that God speaks chiefly through dreams and visions.
Carl Jung, The Symbolic Life (1953); also in Man and His Symbols (1964).
Doubt kills more dreams than failure ever will.
Suzy Kassem Rise Up And Salute The Sun (2010)
One of the most important ways of understanding the unconscious—indeed, as Freud saw it, the royal road to discovering the nature of its contents—is the dream.
Morton Kelsey, Myth, History & Faith: The Mysteries of Christian Myth & Imagination (1974) Ch.VII
I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal." … I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today.
Martin Luther King, Jr., "I Have a Dream," speech at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D.C. (August 28, 1963); reported in the Congressional Record (April 18, 1968), vol. 114, p. 9165.
I chose to dream and act on my dreams, following the example that my father taught. To live with this dream may be crazy, it may be foolish, but to live without it would be a nightmare.
Yolanda King, "A Dream Deferred" Speech (1989) delivered at Denise's alma mater
Dreaming is not merely an act of communication; it is also an aesthetic activity, a game of the imagination, a game that is a value in itself.
Milan Kundera, The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1984). as translated by Michael Henry Heim; Part Two: Soul and Body, p. 59.
Yes, you can kill the dreamer. Absolutely, you can kill the dreamer. But you cannot kill the dream.
Samuel Kyles, as quoted in "Samuel Billy Kyles, Witness to King’s Last Moments, Dies at 81" (30 April 2016), by Sam Roberts, The New York Times
The dream on the pillow,
That flits with the day,
The leaf of the willow
A breath wears away;
The dust on the blossom,
The spray on the sea;
Ay,—ask thine own bosom—
Are emblems of thee.
Letitia Elizabeth Landon, The London Literary Gazette (29th March 1823), 'Song - The dream on the pillow'
I dreamed a dream, that I had flung a chain
Of roses around Love, — I woke, and found
I had chained Sorrow.
Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Literary Souvenir, 1826 (1825), 'The Forsaken'
if after all this any one will be so sceptical as to distrust his senses, and to affirm that all we see and hear, feel and taste, think and do, during our whole being, is but the series and deluding appearances of a long dream, whereof there is no reality; and therefore will question the existence of all things, or our knowledge of anything: I must desire him to consider, that, if all be a dream, then he doth but dream that he makes the question, and so it is not much matter that a waking man should answer him. But yet, if he pleases, he may dream that I make him this answer,
Locke, John An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, Book IV Of Knowledge And Probability
Dream, dream, let me dream,
Wherefore should I waken,
Sleep is as a fairy land
Not yet by spells forsaken.
Break not on the gentle charm
In which night has bound me,
Wherefore, wherefore should I wake
To the cold world around me ?
Letitia Elizabeth Landon, The Casket, 1829, 'Song'
All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, to make it possible. This I did.
T. E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom (1922).
Some dreams tell us what we wish to believe. Some dreams tell us what we fear. Some dreams are of what we know though we may not know we knew it. The rarest dream is the dream that tells us what we did not know.
Ursula K. Le Guin, Social Dreaming of the Frin in David G. Hartwell (ed.) Year's Best Fantasy 3, p. 172 (Originally published at The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction October/November 2002)
“Dreams mean nothing,” he said coldly. “They are unreal.”
“They’re as real as anything else,” she shot back at him. “And they merely mean conscience.”
Fritz Leiber, Gather, Darkness! (1950), Chapter 14
Imagine there's no countries,
It isn't hard to do,
Nothing to kill or die for,
No religion too,
Imagine all the people
living life in peace...
You may say I'm a dreamer,
but I'm not the only one,
I hope some day you'll join us,
And the world will be as one.
John Lennon, in Imagine
"It is new, indeed, for I made it last night in a dream of strange cities; and dreams are older than brooding Tyre, or the contemplative Sphinx, or garden-girdled Babylon."
H. P. Lovecraft, The Call of Cthulhu, Chapter 1
The king lay down not to sleep, he lay down to dream.
Lugalbanda in the Mountain Cave, Ur III Period (21st century BCE).[1]
To the liar it talks in lies, to the truthful it speaks truth. It can make one man happy, it can make another man sing, but it is the closed tablet-basket of the gods. It is the beautiful bedchamber of Ninlil, it is the counsellor of Inana. The multiplier of mankind, the voice of one not alive.
Lugalbanda in the Mountain Cave, Ur III Period (21st century BCE).[2]
There are those, I know, who will reply that the liberation of humanity, the freedom of man and mind, is nothing but a dream. They are right. It is. It is the American Dream.
Archibald MacLeish, "We Have Purpose … We All Know It", Life (May 30, 1960), p. 93. This was one of a series of essays in Life magazine and The New York Times on "The National Purpose."
The value of dreams, like … divinations, is not that they give a specific answer, but that they open up new areas of psychic reality, shake us out of our customary ruts, and throw light on a new segment of our lives. Thus the sayings of the shrine, like dreams, were not to be received passively; the recipients had to "live" themselves into the message.
Rollo May, The Courage to Create (1975), Ch. 5 : The Delphic Oracle as Therapist, p. 106.
This research investigated laypeople's interpretation of their dreams. Participants from both Eastern and Western cultures believed that dreams contain hidden truths (Study 1) and considered dreams to provide more meaningful information about the world than similar waking thoughts (Studies 2 and 3). The meaningfulness attributed to specific dreams, however, was moderated by the extent to which the content of those dreams accorded with participants' preexisting beliefs--from the theories they endorsed to attitudes toward acquaintances, relationships with friends, and faith in God (Studies 3-6). Finally, dream content influenced judgment: Participants reported greater affection for a friend after considering a dream in which a friend protected rather than betrayed them (Study 5) and were equally reluctant to fly after dreaming or learning of a plane crash (Studies 2 and 3). Together, these results suggest that people engage in motivated interpretation of their dreams and that these interpretations impact their everyday lives. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Morewedge, Carey K.; Norton, Michael I. "When dreaming is believing: The (motivated) interpretation of dreams". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 96(2): 249–264. doi:10.1037/a0013264. PMID 19159131.
Whereas Freud was for the most part concerned with the morbid effects of unconscious repression, Jung was more interested in the manifestations of unconscious expression, first in the dream and eventually in all the more orderly products of religion and art and morals.
Lewis Mumford in Interpretations and Forecasts (1967)
The dream censorship functions to preserve sleep by controlling the expression of unconscious wishes, and reventing the generation of unpleasant affect. The inhibition of affect...must be considered as the second consequence of the censorship of dreams, just as dream-distortion is its first consequence' It should be noted that while it is the censorship that necessitates dream distortion, the censorship itself does not actually carry out the distortion, This is done by the dream-work. The work of the censorship is merely to prevent unconscious wishes from entering the preconscious, or from linking up with preconscious wishes. Only if the unconscious wishes can be sufficiently disguised by the dream-work will the censorship permit the compromise formation to be experienced as part of the dream.
Nagera, Humberto, ed. "Manifest content" "Basic Psychoanalytic Concepts on the Theory of Dreams". Abingdon-on-Thames: Routledge. ISBN 1-31767047-7. ISBN 978-1-317-67047-6. p.57, (2014) [1969]
A dream is a creation of the intelligence, the creator being present but not knowing how it will end.
Cesare Pavese, This Business of Living, 1940-07-22
Tonight, may I get so drunk in love that
I do not see any dreams!
Suman Pokhrel, May I Not See Dreams
The dream too thinks twice,
gets filtered to go soft
to be seated on children's eyes.
Suman Pokhrel, Children
I salute my desires with a bow.,
were it not for them to come and play
mind would be empty just like me.
Suman Pokhrel, Desire
Still enveloped in a blanket of dreams
my life continued to lie still, pretending as if
it was in a deep slumber.
Suman Pokhrel, An Encounter with Life
I felt I was getting enraged
and losing my speech
like them losing their dreams.
Suman Pokhrel, Among freed Bonded-Labourers
They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night.
Edgar Allan Poe, Eleonora (1841).
It is the quality and intensity of the dream only which raises men above the biological norm; and it is fidelity to the dream which differentiates the exceptional figure, the man of heroic stature, from the muddling, aimless mediocrities about him. What the dream is, matters not at all — it may be a dream of sainthood, kingship, love, art, asceticism or sensual pleasure — so long as it is fully expressed with all the resources of self.
Burton Rascoe, in the Introduction to Chivalry (1921) by James Branch Cabell, later published in Prometheans : Ancient and Modern (1933), p. 279.
So many of our dreams at first seem impossible, then they seem improbable, and then, when we summon the will, they soon become inevitable.
Christopher Reeve, Speech at the Democratic National Convention (26 August 1996).
Several theories claim that dreaming is a random by-product of REM sleep physiology and that it does not serve any natural function. Phenomenal dream content, however, is not as disorganized as such views imply. The form and content of dreams is not random but organized and selective: during dreaming, the brain constructs a complex model of the world in which certain types of elements, when* compared to waking life, are underrepresented whereas others are over represented. Furthermore, dream content is consistently and powerfully modulated by certain types of waking experiences. On the basis of this evidence, I put forward the hypothesis that the biological function of dreaming is to simulate threatening events, and to rehearse threat perception and threat avoidance. To evaluate this hypothesis, we need to consider the original evolutionary context of dreaming and the possible traces it has left in the dream content of the present human population. In the ancestral environment human life was short and full of threats. Any behavioral advantage in dealing with highly dangerous events would have increased the probability of reproductive success. A dream-production mechanism that tends to select threatening waking events and simulate them over and over again in various combinations would have been valuable for the development and maintenance of threat-avoidance skills. Empirical evidence from normative dream content, children's dreams, recurrent dreams, nightmares, post traumatic dreams, and the dreams of hunter-gatherers indicates that our dream-production mechanisms are in fact specialized in the simulation of threatening events, and thus provides support to the threat simulation hypothesis of the function of dreaming.
Revonsuo, A. (2000). "The reinterpretation of dreams: an evolutionary hypothesis of the function of dreaming". Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 23 (6): 877–901. doi:10.1017/S0140525X00004015. PMID 11515147.
Still speaking of dreams, Seth says: "Energy projected into any kind of construction, psychic or physical, cannot be recalled, but must follow the laws of the particular form into which it has been for the moment molded. Therefore, when the dreamer contracts his multi-realistic objects backward, ending for himself the dream he has constructed, he ends it for himself only. The reality of the dream continues." The energy, as Seth explains it, can be transformed, but not annihilated.
Jane Roberts in The Seth Material, p. 200-201.
It is true of the Nation, as of the individual, that the greatest doer must also be a great dreamer.
Theodore Roosevelt, Berkeley, CA, 1911
Man is essentially a dreamer, wakened sometimes for a moment by some peculiarly obtrusive element in the outer world, but lapsing again quickly into the happy somnolence of imagination. Freud has shown how largely our dreams at night are the pictured fulfilment of our wishes; he has, with an equal measure of truth, said the same of day-dreams; and he might have included the day-dreams which we call beliefs.
Bertrand Russell, Sceptical Essays (1928), Ch. 2: Dreams and Facts
The republic is a dream
Nothing happens unless first a dream.
Carl Sandburg, "Washington Monument by Night," stanza 4, in The Complete Poems of Carl Sandburg, rev. and expanded ed. (1970), p. 282. Ronald Reagan quoted this before a joint session of Congress (April 28, 1981), and added: "As Carl Sandburg said, all we need to begin with is a dream that we can do better than before. All we need to have is faith, and that dream will come true. All we need to do is act, and the time for action is now". Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Ronald Reagan, 1981, p. 394.
But only in their dreams can men be truly free. 'Twas always thus, and always thus will be.
Tom Schulman, Dead Poets Society (1989), expressed by the character John Keating
I think the destiny of all men is not to sit in the rubble of their own making but to reach out for an ultimate perfection which is to be had. At the moment, it is a dream. But as of the moment we clasp hands with our neighbor, we build the first span to bridge the gap between the young and the old. At this hour, it’s a wish. But we have it within our power to make it a reality. If you want to prove that God is not dead, first prove that man is alive.
Rod Serling, speech at Moorpark College, Moorpark, California (3 December 1968)[specific citation needed]
It's simply a national acknowledgement that in any kind of priority, the needs of human beings must come first. Poverty is here and now. Hunger is here and now. Racial tension is here and now. Pollution is here and now. These are the things that scream for a response. And if we don't listen to that scream - and if we don't respond to it - we may well wind up sitting amidst our own rubble, looking for the truck that hit us - or the bomb that pulverized us. Get the license number of whatever it was that destroyed the dream. And I think we will find that the vehicle was registered in our own name.
Rod Serling, Commencement Address at the University of Southern California; March 17, 1970
I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was.
William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream (c. 1595).
To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub:
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil..."
William Shakespeare, Hamlet (c. 1599), Act 3, sc. 1.
We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.
William Shakespeare, The Tempest (c. 1603 - 1612).
There are a kind of men so loose of soul,
That in their sleeps will mutter their affairs.
William Shakespeare, Othello (1603–4), Act III, scene iii.
Is a dream a lie if it don't come true
Or is it something worse?
Bruce Springsteen, "The River", from The River (1980)
Dreams which give timely notice of coming accidents are, unfortunately, quite as often useless as they are efficacious for the protection of those to whom they are sent. Mr. Kendall, from whose psychical diary I have often quoted, sends me the following story of a dream... His class-leader there had lost a leg, and he had heard direct from himself the circumstances under which the loss took place and the dream that accompanied. This class-leader was a blacksmith at a manufacturing mill which was driven by a water-wheel... one night he dreamed that at the close of the day's work the manager detained him to repair it, that his foot slipped and became entangled between the two wheels, and was injured and afterwards amputated... The blacksmith determined to make himself scarce before the hour arrived... He found himself ere he was aware of it back at the mill just as the workpeople were being dismissed. He could not escape, and as he was principal smith he had to go upon the wheel, but he resolved to be very careful. In spite of his care, however, his foot slipped and got entangled between the two wheels just as he had dreamed. It was crushed so badly that he had to be carried to the Bradford Infirmary, where the leg was amputated above the knee. The premonitory dream was thus fulfilled throughout.
W.T. Stead Real Ghost Stories, p. 77, (1921)
It is surely nobler to be a victim of the most noble dream than to profit from a sordid reality and to wallow in it. Dream is akin to aspiration. And aspiration is a kind of divination of an enigmatic vision. And an enigmatic vision in the emphatic sense is the perception of the ultimate mystery, of the truth of the ultimate mystery.
Leo Strauss, Commenting upon the Aleinu prayer, in "Why We Remain Jews" (1962).
“You have the look of one who has lately dreamed.”
“Perhaps I have,” Elric said.
“A fair dream, I hope.”
“Too fair to be anything other than a dream.”
Brad Strickland, The Gate of Dreaming (1994), in Edward E. Kramer and Richard Gilliam (eds.) Tales of the White Wolf (ISBN 1-56504-175-5).
The greatest man of action is he who is the greatest, and a life-long, dreamer. For in him the dreamer is fortified against destruction by a far-seeing eye, a virile mind, a strong will, a robust courage.
And so has perished the kindly dreamer — on the cross or in the garret.
A democracy should not let its dreamers perish. They are its life, its guaranty against decay.
Louis Sullivan, Education (1902), First read before the Architectural League of America, Toronto (1902), later published in Kindergarten Chats (revised 1918) and Other Writings (1947).
In the past, daydreaming was often considered a failure of mental discipline, or worse. Freud labeled it infantile and neurotic. Psychology textbooks warned it could lead to psychosis. Neuroscientists complained that the rogue bursts of activity on brain scans kept interfering with their studies of more important mental functions.
But now that researchers have been analyzing those stray thoughts, they’ve found daydreaming to be remarkably common — and often quite useful. A wandering mind can protect you from immediate perils and keep you on course toward long-term goals. Sometimes daydreaming is counterproductive, but sometimes it fosters creativity and helps you solve problems.
John Tierney, "Discovering the Virtues of a Wandering Mind". , The New York Times. (June 28, 2010).
If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.
Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854), chapter 18, p. 427.
When the brain in not functioning properly during dreams of aggression, sleepwalkers have been able to commit murder. In several cases sleepwalkers did not recognize their victims. For example, one man drove 15 kilometers to his mother-in-law’s house, which means that his motor skills were intact. Then he stabbed her with a knife and did not respond to her screams. He acted as if he was under threat and initiated a fatal attack. This man had a genetic and personal history of awakening abruptly from the first cycle of sleep into a confused state and never entered REM sleep (Cartwright, 2000). The REM sleep is necessary to prevent waking hallucinations and mental illness (Siegel, 2001).
Since aggression is prominent in most dreams, it is likely that our enemies cause this aggression. In a study by Hall and Van de Castle, animals and male strangers are the primary enemies in both male and female dreams. When a animal enters a dream it is almost always going to pose some threat or danger to the dreamer. The reason for this was thought to be because in ancestral times humans lived in an environment full of dangerous animals. There was also a constant threat from other humans. These ever-present dangers made behavioral strategies to avoid contact with these things and was of a high survival value. Dreaming simulates these strategies in order to maintain efficiency; otherwise, one failure to respond to these threats in waking life could mean death. Dreams are biased towards simulating threats that were common in our ancestral environment (Revonsuo, 2000).
Tubo, J. "The evolution of dreaming". Archived from the original on 2011-09-28.
Postremo nemo aegrotus quidquam somniat tam infandum, quod non aliquis dicat philosophus.
The whole life is a succession of dreams. My ambition is to be a conscious dreamer, that is all.
Swami Vivekananda, in a letter from New York to Mary Hale (10 February 1896), in Complete Works, 5.100.
As I became accustomed to keeping dream records, the dreams themselves got "better," with more direct information and precognitive "hits."
Susan M. Watkins, Dreaming Myself, Dreaming A Town, p. 36.
Each day for 14 weeks, 193 college students indicated whether or not they remembered a dream from the previous evening; they also recorded their sleep schedules and noted whether they had (1) exercised and (2) consumed alcohol and caffeine. In addition, the students completed measures of dissociation, schizotypy, sleep-related experiences, and the five-factor model of personality (N=169). Analyses of these data indicated that individual differences in dream recall were strongly stable over a 2-month interval. Dream recall was specifically associated with openness and was unrelated to the other Big Five traits. Subsequent analyses indicated that individuals who are prone to absorption, imagination and fantasy are particularly likely to remember their dreams and to report other vivid nocturnal experiences. These results are consistent with a salience model of dream recall and a continuity model of human consciousness.
Watson, David (2003). "To dream, perchance to remember: Individual differences in dream recall". ‘’Personality and Individual Differences’’. 34 (7): 1271–1286. doi:10.1016/S0191-8869(02)00114-9.
A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world.
Oscar Wilde, The Critic as Artist (1891).
No, Ernest, don't talk about action. It is a blind thing dependent on external influences, and moved by an impulse of whose nature it is unconscious. It is a thing incomplete in its essence, because limited by accident, and ignorant of its direction, being always at variance with its aim. Its basis is the lack of imagination. It is the last resource of those who know not how to dream.
Oscar Wilde, The Major Works Oxford University Press, 2000, p. 256
It is the first duty of a gentleman to dream.
Oscar Wilde, Epigrams of Oscar Wilde Wordsworth Editions, 2001, p. 91
We grow great by dreams. All big men are dreamers. They see things in the soft haze of a spring day or in the red fire of a long winter's evening. Some of us let these great dreams die, but others nourish and protect them; nurse them through bad days till they bring them to the sunshine and light which comes always to those who sincerely hope that their dreams will come true.
Woodrow Wilson, as quoted by Thomas A. Bruno in Take your dreams and Run (South Plainfield: Bridge, 1984), p. 2-3. Source: Dr. Preston Williams (2002): By the Way - A Snapshot Diagnosis of the Inner-City Dilemma, p. 38-39. Xulun Press, Fairfax, Virginia, USA.
I have spread my dreams beneath your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.
William Butler Yeats in "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven".
In dreams begin responsibilities.
William Butler Yeats, epigram to the book Responsibilities (1914), later used as the title of the story "In Dreams Begin Responsibilities" (1937) by Delmore Schwartz.
Things we do and things we see shortly before we fall asleep are most apt to influence our dreams.
W.W. Young, Alice in Wonderland (1915 film)
Once upon a time, I, Chuang Chou, dreamt I was a butterfly, fluttering hither and thither, to all intents and purposes a butterfly. I was conscious only of my happiness as a butterfly, unaware that I was Chou. Soon I awaked, and there I was, veritably myself again. Now I do not know whether I was then a man dreaming I was a butterfly, or whether I am now a butterfly, dreaming I am a man. Between a man and a butterfly there is necessarily a distinction. The transition is called the transformation of material things.
How do I know that enjoying life is not a delusion? How do I know that in hating death we are not like people who got lost in early childhood and do not know the way home? Lady Li was the child of a border guard in Ai. When first captured by the state of Jin, she wept so much her clothes were soaked. But after she entered the palace, shared the king's bed, and dined on the finest meats, she regretted her tears. How do I know that the dead do not regret their previous longing for life? One who dreams of drinking wine may in the morning weep; one who dreams weeping may in the morning go out to hunt. During our dreams we do not know we are dreaming. We may even dream of interpreting a dream. Only on waking do we know it was a dream. Only after the great awakening will we realize that this is the great dream. And yet fools think they are awake, presuming to know that they are rulers or herdsmen. How dense! You and Confucius are both dreaming, and I who say you are a dream am also a dream. Such is my tale. It will probably be called preposterous, but after ten thousand generations there may be a great sage who will be able to explain it, a trivial interval equivalent to the passage from morning to night.
Zhuangzi, Zhuangzi
Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations
Quotes reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922), p. 201-04.
When to soft Sleep we give ourselves away,
And in a dream as in a fairy bark
Drift on and on through the enchanted dark
To purple daybreak—little thought we pay
To that sweet bitter world we know by day.
Thomas Bailey Aldrich, Sonnet, Sleep.
If there were dreams to sell,
Merry and sad to tell,
And the crier rung his bell,
What would you buy?
Thomas Lovell Beddoes, Dream-Pedlary.
"Come to me, darling; I'm lonely without thee;
Daytime and nighttime I'm dreaming about thee."
Joseph Brenan, The Exile To His Wife.
Oft morning dreams presage approaching fate,
For morning dreams, as poets tell, are true.
Michael Bruce, Elegy on Spring.
I dreamt that I dwelt in marble halls,
With vassals and serfs at my side.
Alfred Bunn, Song from Bohemian Girl.
I had a dream, which was not all a dream.
Lord Byron, Darkness.
And dreams in their development have breath,
And tears, and tortures, and the touch of joy;
They have a weight upon our waking thoughts,
They take a weight from off our waking toils,
They do divide our being.
Lord Byron, The Dream, Stanza 1.
A change came o'er the spirit of my dream.
Lord Byron, The Dream, Stanza 3.
The fisher droppeth his net in the stream,
And a hundred streams are the same as one;
And the maiden dreameth her love-lit dream;
And what is it all, when all is done?
The net of the fisher the burden breaks,
And always the dreaming the dreamer wakes.
Alice Cary, Lover's Diary.
Again let us dream where the land lies sunny
And live, like the bees, on our hearts' old honey,
Away from the world that slaves for money—
Come, journey the way with me.
Madison Cawein, Song of the Road.
Like the dreams,
Children of night, of indigestion bred.
Charles Churchill, The Candidate, line 784.
My eyes make pictures, when they are shut.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, A Day Dream.
And so, his senses gradually wrapt
In a half sleep, he dreams of better worlds,
And dreaming hears thee still, O singing lark;
That singest like an angel in the clouds.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Fears in Solitude, line 25.
Dreams are but interludes, which fancy makes;
When monarch reason sleeps, this mimic wakes.
John Dryden, Fables, The Cock and the Fox, line 325.
In blissful dream, in silent night,
There came to me, with magic might,
With magic might, my own sweet love,
Into my little room above.
Heinrich Heine, Youthful Sorrows, Part VI, Stanza 1.
Fly, dotard, fly!
With thy wise dreams and fables of the sky.
Homer, The Odyssey, Book II, line 207. Pope's translation.
Some dreams we have are nothing else but dreams,
Unnatural and full of contradictions;
Yet others of our most romantic schemes
Are something more than fictions.
Thomas Hood, The Haunted House, Part I.
And the dream that our mind had sketched in haste
Shall others continue, but never complete.
For none upon earth can achieve his scheme;
The best as the worst are futile here:
We wake at the self-same point of the dream,—
All is here begun, and finished elsewhere.
Victor Hugo, Early Love Revisited.
Abou Ben Adhem (may his tribe increase!)
Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace.
Leigh Hunt, Abou Ben Adhem.
Your old men shall dream dreams, your young men shall see visions.
Joel, II. 28.
There's a long, long trail a-winding
Into the land of my dreams,
Where the nightingales are singing
And a white moon beams;
There's a long, long night of waiting
Until my dreams all come true,
Till the day when I'll be going down that
Long, long trail with you.
Stoddard King, There's a Long, Long Trail. (Popular in the Great War).
Ever of thee I'm fondly dreaming,
Thy gentle voice my spirit can cheer.
George Linley, Ever of Thee.
'Twas but a dream,—let it pass,—let it vanish like so many others!
What I thought was a flower is only a weed, and is worthless.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Courtship of Miles Standish (1858), Part VII.
Is this is a dream? O, if it be a dream,
Let me sleep on, and do not wake me yet!
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Spanish Student (1843), Act III, scene 5.
For dhrames always go by conthraries, my dear.
Samuel Lover, Rory O'More, Oliver Goldsmith, Citizen of the World, No. 46.
Ground not upon dreams, you know they are ever contrary.
Thomas Middleton, The Family of Love (1602-07), Act IV, scene 3.
I believe it to be true that Dreams are the true Interpreters of our Inclinations; but there is Art required to sort and understand them.
Michel de Montaigne, Essays, Book III, Chapter XIII.
One of those passing rainbow dreams,
Half light, half shade, which fancy's beams
Paint on the fleeting mists that roll,
In trance or slumber, round the soul!
Thomas Moore, Lalla Rookh (1817), Fire Worshippers, Stanza 54.
Oh! that a dream so sweet, so long enjoy'd,
Should be so sadly, cruelly destroy'd!
Thomas Moore, Lalla Rookh (1817), Veiled Prophet of Khorassan, Stanza 62.
A thousand creeds and battle cries,
A thousand warring social schemes,
A thousand new moralities
And twenty thousand, thousand dreams.
Alfred Noyes, Forward.
I am weary of planning and toiling
In the crowded hives of men;
Heart weary of building and spoiling
And spoiling and building again;
And I long for the dear old river
Where I dreamed my youth away;
For a dreamer lives forever,
And a toiler dies in a day.
John Boyle O'Reilly, Cry of the Dreamer.
Namque sub Aurora jam dormitante lucerna Somnia quo cerni tempore vera solent.
Dreams, which, beneath the hov'ring shades of night,
Sport with the ever-restless minds of men,
Descend not from the gods. Each busy brain
Creates its own.
Thomas Love Peacock, Dreams, From Petronius Arbiter.
What was your dream?
It seemed to me that a woman in white raiment, graceful and fair to look upon, came towards me and calling me by name said:
On the third day, Socrates, thou shall reach the coast of fertile Phthia.
Plato, Crito.
That holy dream—that holy dream,
While all the world were chiding,
Hath cheered me as a lovely beam
A lonely spirit guiding.
Edgar Allen Poe, A Dream, Stanza 3.
You are not wrong, who deem
That my days have been a dream;
Yet if hope has flown away
In a night, or in a day,
In a vision, or in none,
Is it therefore the less gone?
All that we see or seem
Is but a dream within a dream.
Edgar Allen Poe, "A Dream Within a Dream" (1849).
O God! Can I not save
One from the pitiless wave?
Is all that we see or seem
But a dream within a dream?
Edgar Allen Poe, "A Dream Within A Dream" (1849).
Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before.
Edgar Allen Poe, The Raven (1844), Stanza 5.
Yet eat in dreams, the custard of the day.
Alexander Pope, The Dunciad (1728; 1735; 1743), Book I, line 92.
Till their own dreams at length deceive 'em
And oft repeating, they believe 'em.
Matthew Prior, Alma (1718), Canto III, line 13.
As a dream when one awaketh.
Psalms. LXXIII. 20.
This morn, as sleeping in my bed I lay,
I dreamt (and morning dreams come true they say).
W. B. Rhodes, Bombastes Furioso. Post medium noctean bisus, quum comnia vera. Horace, Satires, Book I. Sat. 10, line 33. Tibullus, Elegy, Book III. 4.
We must discipline ourselves to convert dreams into plans, and plans into goals, and goals into those small daily activities that will lead us, one sure step at a time, toward a better future.
Jim Rohn, Five Major Pieces To the Life Puzzle (1991).
O Brethren, weep to-day,
The silent God hath quenched my Torch's ray,
And the vain dream hath flown.
Friedrich Schiller, Resignation. Bowring's translation.
Some must delve when the dawn is nigh;
Some must toil when the noonday beams;
But when night comes, and the soft winds sigh,
Every man is a King of Dreams.
Clinton Scollard, King of Dreams.
I'll dream no more—by manly mind
Not even in sleep is well resigned.
My midnight orisons said o'er,
I'll turn to rest and dream no more.
Walter Scott, Lady of the Lake (1810), Canto I, Stanza 35.
Thou hast beat me out
Twelve several times, and I have nightly since
Dreamt of encounters 'twixt thyself and me.
William Shakespeare, Coriolanus (c. 1607-08), Act IV, scene 5, line 127.
There is some ill a-brewing towards my rest,
For I did dream of money-bags to-night.
William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice (late 1590s), Act II, scene 5, line 17.
I have had a most rare vision. I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was.
William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream (c. 1595-96), Act IV, scene 1, line 211.
This is the rarest dream that e'er dull sleep
Did mock sad fools withal.
William Shakespeare, Pericles, Prince of Tyre (c. 1607-08), Act V, scene 1, line 164.
Oh! I have pass'd a miserable night,
So full of ugly sights, of ghastly dreams,
That, as I am a Christian faithful man,
I would not spend another such a night,
Though 'twere to buy a world of happy days.
William Shakespeare, Richard III (c. 1591), Act I, scene 4, line 2.
For never yet one hour in his bed
Have I enjoyed the golden dew of sleep,
But have been waked by his timorous dreams.
William Shakespeare, Richard III (c. 1591), Act IV, scene 1, line 83.
I talk of dreams,
Which are the children of an idle brain,
Begot of nothing but vain fantasy,
Which is as thin of substance as the air
And more inconstant than the wind.
William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet (1597), Act I, scene 4, line 96.
Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck,
And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats,
Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades,
Of healths five-fathom deep.
William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet (1597), Act I, scene 4, line 82.
If I may trust the flattering truth of sleep,
My dreams presage some joyful news at hand:
My bosom's lord sits lightly in his throne;
And all this day an unaccustom'd spirit
Lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts.
William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet (1597), Act V, scene 1, line 1.
We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.
William Shakespeare, The Tempest (c. 1610-1612), Act IV, scene 1, line 156.
Ah, the strange, sweet, lonely delight
Of the Valleys of Dream.
Fiona McLeod, Dream Fantasy.
Across the silent stream
Where the dream-shadows go,
From the dim blue Hill of Dream
I have heard the west wind blow.
Fiona McLeod, From the Hills of Dream.
In an ocean of dreams without a sound.
Percy Bysshe Shelley, The Sensitive Plant, Part I, Stanza 26.
Those dreams, that on the silent night intrude,
And with false flitting shades our minds delude,
Jove never sends us downward from the skies;
Nor can they from infernal mansions rise;
But are all mere productions of the brain,
And fools consult interpreters in vain.
Jonathan Swift, On Dreams.
In the world of dreams, I have chosen my part.
To sleep for a season and hear no word
Of true love's truth or of light love's art,
Only the song of a secret bird.
Algernon Charles Swinburne, A Ballad of Dreamland. Envoi.
The dream
Dreamed by a happy man, when the dark East,
Unseen, is brightening to his bridal morn.
Alfred Tennyson, The Gardener's Daughter, line 71.
Seeing, I saw not, hearing not, I heard.
Tho', if I saw not, yet they told me all
So often that I spake as having seen.
Alfred Tennyson, The Princess (1847), VI, line 3.
Like glimpses of forgotten dreams.
Alfred Tennyson, The Two Voices (1832; 1842), Stanza CXXVII.
The chambers in the house of dreams
Are fed with so divine an air,
That Time's hoar wings grow young therein,
And they who walk there are most fair.
Francis Thompson, Dream Tryst, Stanza 3.
And yet, as angels in some brighter dreams
Call to the soul when man doth sleep.
So some strange thoughts transcend our wonted dreams,
And into glory peep.
Henry Vaughan, Ascension Hymn.
Hunt half a day for a forgotten dream.
William Wordsworth, Hart-Leap Well, Part II, Stanza 9.

Dreams: What They Are and How They Are Caused, by C.W. Leadbeater, (1898)
(Full text online pdf)
The most convenient method in which we can arrange the various branches of our subject will perhaps be the following: first, to consider rather carefully the mechanism — physical, etheric and astral — by means of which impressions are conveyed to our consciousness; secondly, to see how the consciousness in its turn affects and uses this mechanism; thirdly, to note the condition both of the consciousness and its mechanism during sleep; and fourthly, to enquire how the various kinds of dreams which men experience are thereby produced. Chapter 1: Introductory
As I am writing in the main for students of theosophy, I shall feel myself at liberty to use, without detailed explanation, the ordinary theosophical terms, with which I may safely assume them to be familiar, since otherwise my little book would far exceed its allotted limits. Should it, however, fall into the hands of any to whom the occasional use of such terms constitutes a difficulty, I can only apologize to them, and refer them for these preliminary explanations to any elementary theosophical work, such as Mrs Besant's "The Ancient Wisdom", or "Man and his Bodies". Chapter 1: Introductory
Physical. First, then, as to the physical part of the mechanism. We have in our bodies a great central axis of nervous matter, ending in the brain, and from this a network of nerve-threads radiates in every direction through the body. It is these nerve-threads, according to modern scientific theory, which by their vibrations convey all impressions from without to the brain, and the latter, upon receipts of these impressions, translates them into sensations or perceptions; so that if I put my hand upon some object and find it to be hot, it is really not my hand that feels, but my brain, which is acting upon information transmitted to it by the vibrations running along its telegraph wires, the nerve-threads. Chapter 2
Etheric. It is not alone through the brain to which we have hitherto been referring, however, that impressions may be received by the man. Almost exactly co-extensive with and interpenetrating its visible form is his etheric double (formerly called in theosophical literature the linga sharira), and that also has a brain which is really no less physical than the other, though composed of matter in a condition finer than the gaseous. Chapter 2
Astral. Still another mechanism that we have to take into account is the astral body, often called the desire-body. As its name implies, this vehicle is composed exclusively of astral matter, and is, in fact, the expression of the man on the astral plane, just as his physical body is the expression of him on the lower levels of the physical plane. Chapter 2
All these different portions of the mechanism are in reality merely instruments of the ego [higher self/soul], though his control of them is as yet often very imperfect; for it must always be remembered that the ego is himself a developing entity, and that in the case of most of us he is scarcely more than a germ of what he is to be one day. Chapter 3
A stanza in the Book of Dzyan tells us: 'Those who received but a spark remained destitute of knowledge: the spark burned low'; and Madame Blavatsky explains that 'those who receive but a spark constitute the average humanity which have to acquire their intellectuality during the present manvantaric evolution'. ( The Secret Doctrine, ii, 167, 1979 ed.). In the case of most of them that spark is still smouldering, and it will be many an age before its slow increase brings it to the stage of steady and brilliant flame. Chapter 3
Clairvoyant observation bears abundant testimony to the fact that when a man falls into a deep slumber the higher principles in their astral vehicle almost invariably withdraw from the body and hover in its immediate neighbourhood. Indeed, it is the process of this withdrawal which we commonly call 'going to sleep'. Chapter 4
I do not wish here to discuss the question, intensely interesting though it be, as to whether time can be said really to exist, or whether it is but a limitation of this lower consciousness, and all that we call time — past, present and future alike — is 'but one eternal Now'; I wish only to show that when the ego is freed from physical trammels, either during sleep, trance or death, he appears to employ some transcendental measure of time which has nothing in common with our ordinary physiological one. A hundred stories might be told to prove this fact... Chapter 4
It seems that in the Koran there is a wonderful narrative concerning a visit paid one morning by the prophet Mohammed to heaven, during which he saw many different regions there, had them all very fully explained to him, and also had numerous lengthy conferences with various angels; yet when he returned to his body, the bed from which he had risen was still warm, and he found that but a few seconds had passed — in fact, I believe the water had not yet all run out from a jug which he had accidentally overturned as he started on the expedition! Chapter 4
The teacher... and credited with miraculous powers, undertook to prove... to the doubting monarch that the story was, at any rate, not impossible. He had... the sultan just to dip his head into the water and... and to his intense surprise found himself at once in a place entirely unknown to him — on a lonely shore, near the foot of a great mountain... time passed on; he began to get hungry... After wandering about for some time, he found some men at work felling trees in a wood, and applied to them for assistance. They... eventually took him with them to the town where they lived. Here he resided and worked for some years, gradually amassing money, and at length contrived to marry a rich wife... he spent many happy years... bringing up a family of no less than fourteen children... One day, walking by the sea-side, he... plunged into the sea for a bath; and as he raised his head and shook the water from his eyes, he was astounded to find himself standing among his old courtiers, with his teacher of long ago at his side, and a basin of water before him. It was long... before he could be brought to believe that all those years of incident and adventure had been nothing but one moment's dream, caused by the hypnotic suggestion of his teacher, and that really he had done nothing but dip his head quickly into the basin of water... Chapter 4
The Prophetic Dream... Often the prophecy is evidently intended as a warning, and instances are not wanting in which that warning has been taken, and so the dreamer has been saved from injury or death. In most cases the hint is neglected, or its true signification not understood until the fulfillment comes. In others an attempt is made to act upon the suggestion, but nevertheless circumstances over which the dreamer has no control bring him in spite of himself into the position foretold. Stories of such prophetic dreams are so common that the reader may easily find some in almost any of the books on such subjects. Chapter 5
The Confused Dream... by far the commonest of all, may be caused... in various ways. It may be simply a more or less perfect recollection of a series of the disconnected pictures and impossible transformations produced by the senseless automatic action of the lower physical brain; it may be a reproduction of the stream of casual thought which has been pouring through the etheric part of the brain; if sensual images of any kind enter into it, it is due to the ever-restless tide of earthly desire, probably stimulated by some unholy influence of the astral world; it may be due to an imperfect attempt at dramatization on the part of an undeveloped ego; or it may be (and most often is) due to an inextricable mingling of several or all of these influences. Chapter 5
Surely these experiments show very clearly how the remembrance of our dreams becomes so chaotic and inconsequent as it frequently is. Incidentally they also explain why some people — in whom the ego is undeveloped and earthly desires of various kinds are strong — never dream at all, and why many others are only now and then, under a collocation of favourable circumstances, able to bring back a confused memory of nocturnal adventure; and we see, further, from them that if a man wishes to reap in his waking consciousness the benefit of what his ego [higher self/soul] may learn during sleep, it is absolutely necessary for him to acquire control over his thoughts, to subdue all lower passions, and to attune his mind to higher things. Chapter 7
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