IRAN IN THE STATE OF THE UNION
The State of the Union Address is formally prescribed by U.S. Constitution in Article II, Section 3, Clause 1 stating that the President “shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.”

Iran and Persia have been regularly mentioned in the State of Union, which was known as Annual Message until 1946. In the first mention in 1857 President James Buchanan notes the signing of a treaty of friendship on December 13th 1856 between the United States and Persia.

Fourteen U.S. Presidents refereed to Persia and later Iran in 33 State of the Union messages. From comments on treaties and developments such as the Constitutional Revolution by President Taft to Harry Truman's notes on "oil controversy in Iran" to George W. Bush's "axis of evil" speech Iran has regularly attracted attention of U.S. Presidents.

Here are the key quotes from the 33 State of the Union messages.
February, 6 2019
DONALD TRUMP
45th President of the United States: 2017 ‐ 
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
February 06 2019
"My administration has acted decisively to confront the world's leading state sponsor of terror — the radical regime in Iran. It is a radical regime. They do bad, bad things. To ensure this corrupt dictatorship never acquires nuclear weapons, I withdrew the United States from the disastrous Iran nuclear deal.
And last fall, we put in place the toughest sanctions ever imposed on a country. We will not avert our eyes from a regime that chants death to America and threatens genocide against the Jewish people."
January, 30 2018
DONALD TRUMP
45th President of the United States: 2017 ‐ 
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 30, 2018
"As we strengthen friendships all around the world, we are also restoring clarity about our adversaries. When the people of Iran rose up against the crimes of their corrupt dictatorship, I did not stay silent. America stands with the people of Iran in their courageous struggle for freedom. I am asking Congress to address the fundamental flaws in the terrible Iran nuclear deal. My administration has also imposed tough sanctions on the communist and socialist dictatorships in Cuba and Venezuela."
January, 12 2016
BARACK OBAMA
44th President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 12, 2016
"Now, fortunately there is a smarter approach: a patient and disciplined strategy that uses every element of our national power. It says America will always act, alone if necessary, to protect our people and our allies, but on issues of global concern, we will mobilize the world to work with us and make sure other countries pull their own weight. That's our approach to conflicts like Syria, where we're partnering with local forces and leading international efforts to help that broken society pursue a lasting peace. That's why we built a global coalition, with sanctions and principled diplomacy, to prevent a nuclear-armed Iran. And as we speak, Iran has rolled back its nuclear program, shipped out its uranium stockpile, and the world has avoided another war."
January, 20 2015
BARACK OBAMA
44th President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 20, 2015
"Our diplomacy is at work with respect to Iran, where, for the first time in a decade, we've halted the progress of its nuclear program and reduced its stockpile of nuclear material. Between now and this spring, we have a chance to negotiate a comprehensive agreement that prevents a nuclear-armed Iran, secures America and our allies, including Israel, while avoiding yet another Middle East conflict. There are no guarantees that negotiations will succeed, and I keep all options on the table to prevent a nuclear Iran.
But new sanctions passed by this Congress, at this moment in time, will all but guarantee that diplomacy fails: alienating America from its allies, making it harder to maintain sanctions, and ensuring that Iran starts up its nuclear program again. It doesn't make sense. And that's why I will veto any new sanctions bill that threatens to undo this progress. "
"
January, 28 2014
BARACK OBAMA
44th President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 24, 2014
"And it is American diplomacy, backed by pressure, that has halted the progress of Iran's nuclear program and rolled back parts of that program for the very first time in a decade. As we gather here tonight, Iran has begun to eliminate its stockpile of higher levels of enriched uranium. It's not installing advanced centrifuges. Unprecedented inspections help the world verify every day that Iran is not building a bomb. And with our allies and partners, we're engaged in negotiations to see if we can peacefully achieve a goal we all share: preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon.
These negotiations will be difficult. They may not succeed. We are clear eyed about Iran's support for terrorist organizations like Hizballah, which threatens our allies. And we're clear about the mistrust between our nations, mistrust that cannot be wished away. But these negotiations don't rely on trust. Any long-term deal we agree to must be based on verifiable action that convinces us and the international community that Iran is not building a nuclear bomb. If John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan could negotiate with the Soviet Union, then surely a strong and confident America can negotiate with less powerful adversaries today.
The sanctions that we put in place helped make this opportunity possible. But let me be clear: If this Congress sends me a new sanctions bill now that threatens to derail these talks, I will veto it. For the sake of our national security, we must give diplomacy a chance to succeed. If Iran's leaders do not seize this opportunity, then I will be the first to call for more sanctions and stand ready to exercise all options to make sure Iran does not build a nuclear weapon. But if Iran's leaders do seize the chance—and we'll know soon enough—then Iran could take an important step to rejoin the community of nations, and we will have resolved one of the leading security challenges of our time without the risks of war."
January, 24 2012
BARACK OBAMA
44th President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 24, 2012
"And we will safeguard America's own security against those who threaten our citizens, our friends, and our interests. Look at Iran. Through the power of our diplomacy, a world that was once divided about how to deal with Iran's nuclear program now stands as one. The regime is more isolated than ever before. Its leaders are faced with crippling sanctions, and as long as they shirk their responsibilities, this pressure will not relent.
Let there be no doubt: America is determined to prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon, and I will take no options off the table to achieve that goal. But a peaceful resolution of this issue is still possible, and far better. And if Iran changes course and meets its obligations, it can rejoin the community of nations."
January, 25 2011
BARACK OBAMA
44th President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 25, 2011
"Because of a diplomatic effort to insist that Iran meet its obligations, the Iranian Government now faces tougher sanctions, tighter sanctions than ever before. And on the Korean Peninsula, we stand with our ally South Korea and insist that North Korea keeps its commitment to abandon nuclear weapons."
January, 27 2010
BARACK OBAMA
44th President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 27, 2010
"Now, these diplomatic efforts have also strengthened our hand in dealing with those nations that insist on violating international agreements in pursuit of nuclear weapons. That's why North Korea now faces increased isolation and stronger sanctions, sanctions that are being vigorously enforced. That's why the international community is more united and the Islamic Republic of Iran is more isolated. And as Iran's leaders continue to ignore their obligations, there should be no doubt: They too will face growing consequences. That is a promise."
January, 25 2010
BARACK OBAMA
44th President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 25, 2011
"Because of a diplomatic effort to insist that Iran meet its obligations, the Iranian Government now faces tougher sanctions, tighter sanctions than ever before. And on the Korean Peninsula, we stand with our ally South Korea and insist that North Korea keeps its commitment to abandon nuclear weapons."
January, 23 2008
GEORGE W. BUSH
43nd President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 28, 2008
"We're also standing against the forces of extremism embodied by the regime in Tehran. Iran's rulers oppress a good and talented people. And wherever freedom advances in the Middle East, it seems the Iranian regime is there to oppose it. Iran is funding and training militia groups in Iraq, supporting Hizballah terrorists in Lebanon, and backing Hamas efforts to undermine peace in the Holy Land. Tehran is also developing ballistic missiles of increasing range and continues to develop its capability to enrich uranium, which could be used to create a nuclear weapon.
Our message to the people of Iran is clear: We have no quarrel with you. We respect your traditions and your history. We look forward to the day when you have your freedom. Our message to the leaders of Iran is also clear: Verifiably suspend your nuclear enrichment so negotiations can begin. And to rejoin the community of nations, come clean about your nuclear intentions and past actions, stop your oppression at home, cease your support for terror abroad. But above all, know this: America will confront those who threaten our troops, we will stand by our allies, and we will defend our vital interests in the Persian Gulf."
January, 23 2007
GEORGE W. BUSH
43nd President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 23, 2007
" In recent times, it has also become clear that we face an escalating danger from Shi'a extremists who are just as hostile to America and are also determined to dominate the Middle East. Many are known to take direction from the regime in Iran, which is funding and arming terrorists like Hizballah, a group second only to Al Qaida in the American lives it has taken."
"If American forces step back before Baghdad is secure, the Iraqi Government would be overrun by extremists on all sides. We could expect an epic battle between Shi'a extremists backed by Iran and Sunni extremists aided by Al Qaida and supporters of the old regime. "
"The United Nations has imposed sanctions on Iran and made it clear that the world will not allow the regime in Tehran to acquire nuclear weapons. "
January, 31 2006
GEORGE W. BUSH
43nd President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 31, 2006
"Yet liberty is the future of every nation in the Middle East because liberty is the right and hope of all humanity.
The same is true of Iran, a nation now held hostage by a small clerical elite that is isolating and repressing its people. The regime in that country sponsors terrorists in the Palestinian territories and in Lebanon, and that must come to an end. The Iranian Government is defying the world with its nuclear ambitions, and the nations of the world must not permit the Iranian regime to gain nuclear weapons. America will continue to rally the world to confront these threats.
Tonight let me speak directly to the citizens of Iran: America respects you, and we respect your country. We respect your right to choose your own future and win your own freedom. And our Nation hopes one day to be the closest of friends with a free and democratic Iran.
"
February, 2 2005
GEORGE W. BUSH
43nd President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
February 02,2005
"Today, Iran remains the world's primary state sponsor of terror, pursuing nuclear weapons while depriving its people of the freedom they seek and deserve. We are working with European allies to make clear to the Iranian regime that it must give up its uranium enrichment program and any plutonium reprocessing and end its support for terror. And to the Iranian people, I say tonight: As you stand for your own liberty, America stands with you."
January, 20 2004
GEORGE W. BUSH
43nd President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 20, 2004
"Along with nations in the region, we're insisting that North Korea eliminate its nuclear program. America and the international community are demanding that Iran meet its commitments and not develop nuclear weapons. America is committed to keeping the world's most dangerous weapons out of the hands of the most dangerous regimes."
January, 28 2003
GEORGE W. BUSH
43nd President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 28, 2003
"Different threats require different strategies. In Iran, we continue to see a Government that represses its people, pursues weapons of mass destruction, and supports terror. We also see Iranian citizens risking intimidation and death as they speak out for liberty and human rights and democracy. Iranians, like all people, have a right to choose their own Government and determine their own destiny, and the United States supports their aspirations to live in freedom."
January, 29 2002
GEORGE W. BUSH
43nd President of the United States: 2001 ‐ 2009
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 29, 2002
"Iran aggressively pursues these weapons and exports terror, while an unelected few repress the Iranian people's hope for freedom.
intimidation and death as they speak out for liberty and human rights and democracy. Iranians, like all people, have a right to choose their own Government and determine their own destiny, and the United States supports their aspirations to live in freedom...States like these and their terrorist allies constitute an axis of evil, arming to threaten the peace of the world. By seeking weapons of mass destruction, these regimes pose a grave and growing danger. "
January, 27 2000
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
42nd President of the United States: 1993 ‐ 2001
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 27, 2000
"We must meet this threat by making effective agreements to restrain nuclear and missile programs in North Korea, curbing the flow of lethal technology to Iran, preventing Iraq from threatening its neighbors, increasing our preparedness against chemical and biological attack, protecting our vital computer systems from hackers and criminals, and developing a system to defend against new missile threats, while working to preserve our ABM missile treaty with Russia. We must do all these things."
January, 27 1987
RONALD REAGAN 
40th President of the United States: 1981 ‐ 1989
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 23, 1987
"But though we've made much progress, I have one major regret: I took a risk with regard to our action in Iran. It did not work, and for that I assume full responsibility. The goals were worthy. I do not believe it was wrong to try to establish contacts with a country of strategic importance or to try to save lives. And certainly it was not wrong to try to secure freedom for our citizens held in barbaric captivity."
January, 23 1980
JIMMY CARTER 
39th President of the United States: 1977 ‐ 1981
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 23, 1980
"At this time in Iran, 50 Americans are still held captive, innocent victims of terrorism and anarchy. Also at this moment, massive Soviet troops are attempting to subjugate the fiercely independent and deeply religious people of Afghanistan. These two acts—one of international terrorism and one of military aggression-present a serious challenge to the United States of America and indeed to all the nations of the world. Together, we will meet these threats to peace."
January, 7 1954
DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER
34th President of the United States: 1953 ‐ 1961
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 07, 1954
" In West Germany, in Iran, and in other areas of the world, heartening political victories have been won by the forces of stability and freedom. Slowly but surely, the free world gathers strength. Meanwhile, from behind the iron curtain, there are signs that tyranny is in trouble and reminders that its structure is as brittle as its surface is hard."
January, 9 1952
HARRY S. TRUMAN
33nd President of the United States: 1945 ‐ 1953
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
January 09, 1952
"In the Middle East political tensions and the oil controversy in Iran are keeping the region in a turmoil. In the Far East the dark threat of Communist imperialism still hangs over many nations."
December, 5 1911
WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT
27nd President of the United States: 1909 ‐ 1913
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
December 05 1911
"Persia has been the scene of a long internal struggle. These conditions have been the cause of uneasiness in European diplomacy, but thus far without direct political concern to the United States."
December, 7 1888
WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT
27nd President of the United States: 1909 ‐ 1913
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
December 04, 1883
"Constitutional government seems also to have made further advance in Persia. These events have turned the eyes of the world upon the Near East. In that quarter the prestige of the United States has spread widely through the peaceful influence of American schools, universities and missionaries. "
December, 3 1888
GROVER CLEVELAND
22nd President of the United States: 1885 ‐ 1859
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
December 03, 1888
"Persia has established diplomatic representation at this capital, and has evinced very great interest in the enterprise and achievements of our citizens. I am therefore hopeful that beneficial commercial relations between the two countries may be brought about."
December, 4 1883
CHESTER A. ARTHUR
21th President of the United States: 1881 ‐ 1885
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
December 04, 1883
"In pursuance of the policy declared by ibis Government of extending our intercourse with the Eastern nations, legations have during the past year been established in Persia, Siam, and Korea. It is probable that permanent missions of those countries will ere long be maintained in the United States. A special embassy from Siam is now on its way hither."
December, 4 1882
CHESTER A. ARTHUR
21th President of the United States: 1881 ‐ 1885
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
December 04, 1882
"The Shah of Persia has expressed his gratification that a charge' d'affaires will shortly be sent to that country, where the rights of our citizens have been hitherto courteously guarded by the representatives of Great Britain."
December, 9 1868
ANDREW JOHNSON
17th President of the United States: 1865 ‐ 1869
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
December 09, 1868
"No important question has occurred during the last year in our accustomed cordial and friendly intercourse with Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, San Salvador, France, Austria, Belgium, Switzerland, Portugal, the Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden and Norway, Rome, Greece, Turkey, Persia, Egypt, Liberia, Morocco, Tripoli, Tunis, Muscat, Siam, Borneo, and Madagascar."
December 08, 1857
JAMES BUCHANAN
15th President of the United States: 1857 ‐ 1861
From the the Message to Congress on the State of the Union
December 08, 1857
"A treaty of friendship and commerce was concluded at Constantinople on the 13th December, 1856, between the United States and Persia, the ratifications of which were exchanged at Constantinople on the 13th June, 1857, and the treaty was proclaimed by the President on the 18th August, 1857. This treaty, it is believed, will prove beneficial to American commerce. The Shah has manifested an earnest disposition to cultivate friendly relations with our country, and has expressed a strong wish that we should be represented at Teheran by a minister plenipotentiary; and I recommend that an appropriation be made for this purpose."
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