Directorate-General for Trade
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The Directorate-General for Trade (DG TRADE) is a Directorate-General of the European Commission​. It covers a wide area from manufactured goods to services, intellectual property and investment.​[1]
As of 1 June 2019 Sabine Weyand is the Director-General.​[2] The DG Trade reports to the Trade Commissioner​.
Contents
1Trade Commissioner history
2Organisation
3See also
4References
5External links
Trade Commissioner history​[​edit​]
Under the authority in the Juncker Commission of Cecilia Malmström​, the European Commissioner for Trade, DG TRADE coordinated trade relations between the European Union (EU) and the rest of the world.
On 1 December 2019, the Von der Leyen Commission took office, and Phil Hogan was made Trade Commissioner.​[3]​[4]
Organisation​[​edit​]
See also​[​edit​]
References​[​edit​]
  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "Trade policy and you --> Contacts --> People". European Commission​. Retrieved 4 June 2020.
  3. ^ "Hogan convinces MEPs by toughening up trade stance". EURACTIV MEDIA NETWORK BV. 1 October 2019.
  4. ^ "Von der Leyen's Commission: The ones to watch at Europe's new top table". BBC. 27 November 2019.
External links​[​edit​]
Table of European Commission Directorates-General and Services
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