Triangle model
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In macroeconomics​, the triangle model employed by new Keynesian economics is a model of inflation derived from the Phillips Curve and given its name by Robert J. Gordon. The model views inflation as having three root causes: built-in inflation, demand-pull inflation, and cost-push inflation​.​[1] Unlike the earliest theories of the Phillips Curve, the triangle model attempts to account for the phenomenon of stagflation​.
References​[​edit​]
^ Robert J. Gordon (1988), Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy, 2nd ed., Chap. 22.4, 'Modern theories of inflation'. McGraw-Hill.

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This page was last edited on 12 March 2013, at 11:10 (UTC).
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