Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers: Series II/Volume I/Constantine/The Life of Constantine/Book III/Chapter 28
< Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers: Series II‎ | Volume I‎ | Constantine‎ | The Life of Constantine‎ | Book III
Chapter 27
Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers: Series II/Volume I/Constantine/The Life of Constantine/Book III
Philip Schaff et al.
Chapter 28
Chapter 29
Chapter XXVIII.—Discovery of the Most Holy Sepulchre.[1]
This also was accomplished without delay. But as soon as the original surface of the ground, beneath the covering of earth, appeared, immediately, and contrary to all expectation, the venerable and hollowed monument of our Saviour’s resurrection was discovered. Then indeed did this most holy cave present a faithful similitude of his return to life, in that, after lying buried in darkness, it again emerged to light, and afforded to all who came to witness the sight, a clear and visible proof of the wonders of which that spot had once been the scene, a testimony to the resurrection of the Saviour clearer than any voice could give.

Footnotes
On the site of the sepulchre, compare Besant, Sepulchre, the Holy, in Smith and Cheetham, 2 (1880), 1881–1888. He discusses (a) Is the present site that fixed upon by the officers of Constantine? and (b) Was that site certainly or even probably the true spot where our Lord was buried? Compare also reports of the Palestine Exploration Fund Survey, Jerusalem, 1884, p. 429–435 (Conder).
Last edited on 25 December 2010, at 07:56
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