MARC LYNCH
Twitter Devolutions
How social media is hurting the Arab Spring.
BY MARC LYNCH | FEBRUARY 7, 2013, 4:35 PM
Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
Tahrir Square launched a thousand dissertations on how social media drove the frenetic mobilization of the Arab Spring. Egyptian activists may rage at the notion that the revolution was driven by technology rather than by their determined efforts, but there’s a good case to be made that social media did matter — at least a bit — in shaping the uprisings across the Arab world. But the celebratory narrative about social media needs to be tempered by the reality of the struggles that have befallen most of these countries in transition. Whether or not Twitter made the Arab revolutions, is it now helping to kill them?
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