Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
NMNH After Hours
Programs for Adults
Evening and Weekend Programs
Have fun, meet others, and explore the issues of our time through our science and cultural programming offered on evenings and weekends. Our After Hours events give you access to scientists, filmmakers, authors, and innovators seeking to better understand the natural world and our place in it. After Hours events are designed for adults, but all are welcome.
View After Hours Calendar
NMNH After Hours programs include:
Other Programs
Programs in other series, such as HOT (Human Origins Today) Topics and Virtual Science Cafés; plus programs that are not part of a series.
October 21, 2021, 11:30-12:30 p.m. EDT –
The Evolution of Human Warfare and Peacefare

The sculpture "Non-Violence," by Carl Fredrik Reuterswärd, in front of United Nations headquarters in New York City. Image credit: ZhengZhou CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikipedia.
It might seem like humans are predisposed towards violence and aggression. But is the truth more complicated than that? And what role does compassion and peace play in our origins? 
 
Marc Kissel, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Appalachian State University, will share the research he and his colleagues  have done to study these questions and help to better understand the roles of compassion and of violence in the past. 
 
Moderator: Briana Pobiner, paleoanthropologist and educator at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History
This program is offered as part of the ongoing HOT (Human Origins Today) Topic series and will be presented as a Zoom video webinar. A link will be emailed to all registrants. Register
 
Monday, November 15, 2021, from 5 – 6 p.m. EST:
Building Dinosaurs: Behind the Scenes

Caitlin Wylie. Image credit: University of Virginia School of Engineering.
The iconic dinosaur skeletons we see in museums didn't just wake up like this. It takes a whole team of fossil preparators — technicians who painstakingly remove the fossils from rock, repair broken bones, and reconstruct missing pieces, to create them. These specimens are foundational evidence for paleontologists, and yet the work and workers in fossil preparation labs go largely unacknowledged in publications and specimen records. Not any more, thanks to a new book by Caitlin Wylie.
In "Preparing Dinosaurs: The Work behind the Scenes," Wylie investigates the creativity, problem-solving, and craft required of fossil preparators to decide what fossils, and therefore dinosaurs, look like. Wylie is an Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society at the University of Virginia. Join us for a conversation with Wylie, moderated by Steve Jabo, Vertebrate Fossil Preparator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History.  
This program will be presented as a Zoom video webinar. A link will be emailed to all registrants. Register
 
Thursday, November 18, 2021, from 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. EST:
How Humans Survive in Extreme Environments

Cara Ocobock ice fishing. Photo by Minna Turunen.
Mount Everest, the Sahara Desert, and the Arctic Circle — these are just some of the extremes humans experience. But how have humans evolved to live in such a broad range of environments?
Cara Ocobock, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Human Energetics Laboratory at University of Notre Dame, will explore how humans have biologically, culturally, and technologically overcome these extremes in order to survive and thrive in some of the globe’s most inhospitable environments.
Moderator: Briana Pobiner, paleoanthropologist and educator at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History.
This program is offered as part of the ongoing HOT (Human Origins Today) Topic series. 
This program will be presented as a Zoom video webinar. A link will be emailed to all registrants. Register
Beyond the Exhibition
This series features the content, curators, and conversations inspiring new and developing exhibitions at the National Museum of Natural History.
Wednesday, October 27, 2021, from 5:00-6:00 p.m. EDT:
Feral Landscapes: Ecosystems in a Concrete Jungle

Photo from Triangular Corner Lot (Broadway and Dekalb Avenue, Brooklyn, NY, 5/4/2015–5/29/2016) by Ellie Irons, which depicts side-by-side views of urban micro-landscapes over time, emphasizing the ebb and flow of natural and human modifications.
For years, interdisciplinary artist Ellie Irons has explored the indomitability of plants. In a concrete-laden corner of Brooklyn, she has been making watercolor paint from the weedy plants that thrive in the city, and has also used photography to document what she terms the "feral landscapes" they inhabit, tracing the ongoing cycles of growth, maintenance, decay, and development that characterize these urban green spaces.
In a conversation with co-founder and executive director of Capital Nature, Stella Tarnay, moderated by co-curator of the Unsettled Nature exhibition, Scott Wing, Irons will provide an overview of her Feral Landscape Typologies project, exploring how urban ecology and so-called "vacant" space intertwine to create vibrant, dynamic habitats in dense city settings. 
This program will be presented as a Zoom video webinar. A link will be emailed to all registrants. Register
This program is part of  the Unsettled Nature: Artist Event Series, conversations with artists featured in the Unsettled Nature: Artists Reflect on the Age of Humans exhibit.
Natural History on the Big Screen
This film series presents a curated selection of natural history-related films, followed by discussions with filmmakers and related experts.
An Evening With
This signature series features cutting-edge thought leaders in conversation with paleontologist and Sant Director of the National Museum of Natural History, Kirk Johnson.
Anthropocene: Life in the Age of Humans
This discussion series explores human impact on the environment, featuring scholars, artists, and others in an intimate conversational setting.
Exploring the Arctic
These programs explore the cultures and natural history of the north.
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