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Clair Wills
The Wages of Virtue
Chastity seems like a simple concept, but a new history proposes that it has always been a shifting and malleable virtue.
November 4, 2021 issue
Declan Ryan
‘I Work and I Remember’
In Lawrence Joseph’s poetry there’s no escape from the memories of his formative, difficult years in Detroit.
November 4, 2021 issue
Michael Massing
The Story the Media Missed in Afghanistan
Belated press coverage of what enabled the Taliban’s return to power as the US withdrew exposed past failures to report the conflict’s effects on Afghans beyond Kabul.
October 20, 2021
Assaf Sharon
‘This Obstinate Little Man’
Tom Segev’s biography of David Ben-Gurion depicts a man who intended to become a Zionist Lenin but ended up “an Israeli King Lear.”
November 4, 2021 issue
Jed Perl
Colors in Conversation
Joan Mitchell was a Romantic whose paintings join nature and feelings with an operatic lyricism.
November 4, 2021 issue
Audrey Wollen
Not to Be
A Matter of Death and Life presents the closing scenes of a long marriage as both an informal diary and an instructive text.
November 4, 2021 issue
Jane Hu
Portrait of the Robot as a Young Woman
From his first novel to his latest, Kazuo Ishiguro has considered what it means to care for and attend to others.
November 4, 2021 issue
Natalie Angier
Claw & Order
What do we owe nature, and how might we do a better job of coexisting with species that do not exist for our pleasure and sustenance?
November 4, 2021 issue
Ian Johnson
Chinese Medicine in the Covid Wards
One doctor’s mission to show that traditional healing arts could help in a national crisis.
November 4, 2021 issue
Bill McKibben
The Future Is Electric
Because electricity is so much more efficient than combustion, totally electrifying our country would cut primary energy use about in half.
November 4, 2021 issue
Elizabeth Strout; illustration by Alain Pilon
“In a series of recent works, whose frequency hints at a tumultuous amount of unshared experience, Elizabeth Strout has written with dazzling acuity about a whole cluster of overlooked lives.”
— Pankaj Mishra: Writing the Other America
November 4, 2021
Current Issue
New Poems
Susan Barba
For the Growers and the Grocers
November 4, 2021 issue
Richie Hofmann
At the Rustic Hamlet Built in 1783 for Marie Antoinette, Last Queen of France
November 4, 2021 issue
Jorie Graham
They Ask Me
October 21, 2021 issue
Jenny Uglow
Napoleon’s Greatest Trophy
How a Venetian masterpiece ended up in the Louvre.
October 21, 2021 issue
Laura Marsh
Are the Kids All Right?
If Jonathan Franzen’s earlier books were steeped in ironic social observation, Crossroads is an experiment in sincerity.
October 21, 2021 issue
Ursula Lindsey
In the Fire
The Egyptian feminist Nawal El Saadawi fearlessly told unpleasant truths about discrimination against women in Arab countries.
October 21, 2021 issue
Sue Halpern
The Human Costs of AI
Artificial intelligence does not come to us as a deus ex machina but, rather, through a number of dehumanizing extractive practices, of which most of us are unaware.
October 21, 2021 issue
The Latest
Fintan O’Toole
Ireland’s Coming of Age and Mine
For a Dublin kid growing up in the 1960s and 1970s, the whole experience was mirrored in the nation’s quest for identity.
October 18, 2021
Yasmine El Rashidi
Pharaonic Ambition in Ferro-Concrete
This makeover of Egypt’s capital is not just heedless of its heritage, but wantonly destructive of old neighborhoods—all in service of a self-aggrandizing nationalist mythology.
October 16, 2021
Adam Shatz
Coltrane’s New ‘Love Supreme’
The studio version has long been recognized as the jazz saxophonist’s masterwork. But a recently unearthed live recording is nothing short of a revelation.
October 7, 2021
Read More
Brief Encounters
Raja Shehadeh, interviewed by Matt Seaton
In His Father’s Footsteps
“So I continued to visit Jaffa, but I had to rely more on my imagination because the reality was of an entirely different place from what he had described.”
October 16, 2021
Ben Lerner, interviewed by Jana Prikryl
Unknown Sources of Lift
“I think there’s an understandable but perilous tendency to conflate art and artist when the artist in question uses autobiographical elements in their work.”
October 9, 2021
Gavin Francis, interviewed by Lucy Jakub
Human Diagnostics
“Life in lockdown is not natural for the majority of Homo sapiens. In the ballooning of mental health problems this year, we’ve seen just how deleterious those kinds of restrictions are.”
October 2, 2021
Nathaniel Rich, interviewed by Daniel Drake
Emissary from a Watery Future
“Writers can’t do a lot about climate change. But writers can help us puzzle through what climate change is doing to us.”
September 25, 2021
More
Free from the Archives
Survival of the Fittest
The word “emoticon” appeared in the Review for the first time in this 1993 article by Nicholson Baker on the history of punctuation.
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Politics
Michael Massing
The Story the Media Missed in Afghanistan
October 20, 2021
Yasmine El Rashidi
Pharaonic Ambition in Ferro-Concrete
October 16, 2021
Raja Shehadeh
In His Father’s Footsteps
October 16, 2021
David Cole
Let the Decision Stand
November 4, 2021 issue
More Politics
Literature
Fintan O’Toole
Ireland’s Coming of Age and Mine
October 18, 2021
Susan Barba
For the Growers and the Grocers
November 4, 2021 issue
Jane Hu
Portrait of the Robot as a Young Woman
November 4, 2021 issue
Clair Wills
The Wages of Virtue
November 4, 2021 issue
More Literature
Arts
Jed Perl
Colors in Conversation
November 4, 2021 issue
Larry Wolff
A Halo of Nostalgia
November 4, 2021 issue
Adam Shatz
Coltrane’s New ‘Love Supreme’
October 7, 2021
Ed Park
A Poet’s-Eye View
October 21, 2021 issue
More Arts
Ideas
Natalie Angier
Claw & Order
November 4, 2021 issue
Clair Wills
The Wages of Virtue
November 4, 2021 issue
David Cole
Let the Decision Stand
November 4, 2021 issue
Larry Wolff
A Halo of Nostalgia
November 4, 2021 issue
More Ideas
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The N'Gustro Affair
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