The Take
Al Jazeera Podcasts
Making sense of the world, one story at a time. Host Malika Bilal and journa
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Why are China’s billionaires writing big checks to charity?
The biggest threat to China’s future prosperity may not come from the US, but from within as it wrestles with falling birthrates and rising inequality. How concerned is China about the widening gap between the country’s haves and have nots? Look no further than its billionaires, who’ve suddenly become very generous. In this episode:  Michael Standaert (@mstandaert), journalist  Einar Tangen (@ehtangen), commentator on economics and political affairs Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
Jul 2621 min

COVID, protest, racism: The 'no-fun Olympics'
COVID-19, racism, anti-semitism and a crackdown on protest — all dark clouds hanging over this year’s Olympic games in Tokyo. The International Olympic Committee made a huge gamble in postponing the event to 2021. Has it paid off? In this episode: Jules Boykoff (@julesboykoff), political scientist, former Olympian, and author of ‘Activism and the Olympics’ Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
Jul 2322 min

Jobless, hungry, fed-up: Why South Africans rioted
As many as 75% of young South Africans are unemployed. In any other country that would be cause for a revolution according to one South African economist. Why did rioting and looting sweep the country last week? And could violence erupt again? This week The Take explores the vast inequality and economic hardships behind South Africa’s latest unrest. In this episode:  Bonginkosi Mchunu, 24 year old resident of Gretown Township in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, Influencer for Youth Capital South Africa and Corporate Specialist  Duma Gqubule (@DumaGqubule), South African economist and financial journalist Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
Jul 2121 min

What the billionaire space race means for the rest of us
The world’s richest man, Jeff Bezos, is heading to space on his own spaceship on July 20th – though he’s already been upstaged by another billionaire space tour. Where the global space race was once decided by the wealth of nations, now its future is increasingly determined by ultra-wealthy individuals worth more than many countries. Their pursuit of space could put new resources in reach, and it’s reshaping the laws of outer space – at least, the ones made by humans. In this episode:  Lucianne Walkowicz (@RocketToLulu), astronomer at the Adler Planetarium and co-founder of Just Space Alliance (@JustSpaceOrg) Lisa Ruth Rand (@orbital_decay), assistant Professor at the California Institute of Technology Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
Jul 1923 min

The killing of Samuel Luiz outrages Spain's LGBTQ community
Samuel Luiz, a 24-year-old nursing assistant, was beaten to death in early July in A Coruña, a city in northwest Spain. Witnesses say his aggressors reportedly used homophobic slurs while attacking him. But the police have not deemed it a hate crime yet.  The killing has shocked the LGBTQ community, and many have started a conversation online about their own experiences with attacks. Others are questioning how progressive the European country really is. In this episode:  Begoña Gómez Urzaiz (@begogomezurzaiz), freelance journalist in Barcelona Mateo Sancho (@mateosancho), journalist and sociologist Enrique Aparicio (@esnorquel), journalist Rubén Serrano (@RubenSerranoM), journalist and author Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
Jul 1623 min

Haiti, after Jovenel Moise’s assassination
Jovenel Moise's assassination has thrown Haiti into a fog of political confusion. But with gangs running the streets, and extreme poverty across the country, Haiti was in a state of crisis long before his killing. In this episode:  Jetry Dumont (@_jetry_), director of the Haitian media company Ayibopost Monique Clesca (@moniclesca), democracy activist Johnny Celestin (@johnnycelestin), Haitian-American  Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
Jul 1421 min

The US is leaving. What's next for Afghanistan?
After 20 years the United States is ending its occupation of Afghanistan. A lot has changed but many Afghans like journalist Ali Latifi are concerned about how many things are still the same. Roads remain unpaved, the electricity is spotty and a newly energized Taliban is threatening to take back the Afghan state. Many Afghans are now left wondering what happened to the US promises and why the Afghan people have been left behind. In this episode:  Ali Laitifi (@alibomaye), Afghan journalist covering Afghanistan Osama Bin Javaid (@osamabinjavaid), Al Jazeera correspondent covering the Taliban Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
Jul 1222 min

Euro 2020: The politics of the game
For the last few weeks, people around the world have been tuning in to Euro 2020, one of the biggest sporting events since the start of the pandemic. And like most international tournaments, there's a conversation to be had about nationalism, whether it's teams butting heads, or the ethnic and racial makeup of those teams. So what can Euro 2020, and this sport, tell us about the politics of Europe? In this episode:  Tony Karon (@tonykaron), editorial lead at AJ+ (@ajplus) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
Jul 922 min

Daniel Ortega cracks down on his opposition in Nicaragua
Since June, at least 27 people have been detained in the Central American country. Among them are presidential hopefuls, journalists, opposition leaders, farmer activists, student leaders, businessmen and even figureheads of the Sandinista revolution that once freed Daniel Ortega from jail. The crackdown has sparked international outrage, with the country’s opposition saying President Daniel Ortega is trying to eliminate any possible challengers ahead of the November presidential election. In this episode:  Lucia Newman (@lucianewman), Al Jazeera's Latin America editor Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.
Jul 721 min

Unpacking the mystery around China’s roaming elephants
Videos of the mysterious migrating herd of elephants in China have become an internet sensation. But no one knows why they're on the move. The fact that they are points to a deeper environmental problem. Human-elephant conflict is on the rise pretty much everywhere the gentle giants live, and without concrete action, the problem will only get worse. In this episode:  Dr Josh Plotnik (@CCCAnimals), assistant professor of psychology at Hunter College of City University of New York (CUNY) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.
Jul 521 min

A critic’s death turns eyes on the Palestinian Authority
There was an unusual target for protests in the Occupied West Bank this week: the Palestinian Authority. Protesters were angry after the death of a well-known critic named Nizar Banat, who was killed in a violent arrest. With elections called off earlier this year and a crackdown on the protests, the demands for accountability in Palestine are growing louder. In this episode:  Nida Ibrahim (@nida_journo), Al Jazeera correspondent in the West Bank Stefanie Dekker (@StefanieDekker), Al Jazeera correspondent Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.
Jul 223 min

The Delta variant catches the world unmasked
We’ve been hearing concerns about COVID variants since the outbreak began but none are as worrying as the Delta strain. At least, so far. From Asia to Africa to South America the vaccinated, under vaccinated and unvaccinated are all reaching for their masks. Why does this variant seem so much more alarming than the rest? Could it disrupt Euro 2020? And how does vaccine inequality play a role? That’s this episode of The Take.   In this episode:  Dr Syra Madad (@syramadad), Epidemiologist, Senior Director for Special Pathogens with the New York City Health System and a member of the Federation of American Scientists COVID task force Dr Salam Gueye (@SalamGueye), World Health Organization Africa’s regional emergencies director Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.
Jun 3022 min

How activists are targeting an Israeli shipping line
For the past few weeks, protesters along the Western coast of North America have been attempting to block ships operated by the Israeli company ZIM from unloading cargo. They’re trying to pressure Israel into ending its military occupation and complying with international law. In this episode, we talk to a blockade organizer and an historian about why targeting ships is an activist tactic.  In this episode:  Lara Kiswani, Executive Director of the Arab Resource and Organizing Center (@AROCBayArea); Peter Cole (@ProfPeterCole), professor of history and author of Dockworker Power: Race and Activism in Durban and the San Francisco Bay Area. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.
Jun 2818 min

Discovery of graves reopens wound for Indigenous people in Canada
For over a century, Indigenous children were forcibly taken away from their families to residential schools created by the Canadian government and administered by churches. Survivors have reported that all kinds of abuse happened there. Last May, the first mass burial site was discovered with the remains of 215 children on the grounds of a former residential school. This week, less than a month later, a First Nations official announced the discovery of hundreds of unmarked graves at the site of another former residential school. Even when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has publicly apologized for Canada's history with its Indigenous people, many say his government’s actions when it comes to reparations do not reflect his words. In this episode:  Josie Nepinak, residential school survivor Brandi Morin (@Songstress28), Cree/Iroquois/French Journalist Cindy Blackstock (@cblackst), Executive Director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.
Jun 2522 min

How China is censoring Hong Kong's schools
It’s been just about one year since Beijing’s National Security Law for Hong Kong took effect. It criminalizes secession, sedition and collusion with foreign forces. Dozens of activists and journalists have been arrested under the decree, and now, changes in the schools mean teachers’ jobs and students’ learning are also at risk. In this episode:  “Steve,” a secondary school teacher in Hong Kong Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod) Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.
Jun 2321 min

The sounds of Mexico’s last rainforest
Scientists say that two-thirds of the biggest rainforest in Mexico, the Lancandon Jungle, has been lost. With only 10% of virgin territory to protect, environmental groups and indigenous people are fighting to curb deforestation, illegal logging, and trade with protected species.To help us celebrate World Rainforest Day, we talked to Al Jazeera’s correspondent in Mexico, Manuel Rapalo, about his excursion to the jungle and the protected species he met there. In this episode:  Manuel Rapalo (@Manuel_Rapalo), Al Jazeera correspondent in Mexico Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jun 2122 min

Iran is voting. Why the apathy?
It’s election day in Iran and for many, the question is not who to vote for, but whether to vote at all. Strong candidates were disqualified from running, and conservative Ebrahim Raisi is a clear frontrunner. The stakes are high: the winner of this election will lead Iran through a pandemic, intense economic sanctions, runaway inflation, and the ongoing negotiations to restore the nuclear deal. So how much does this election mean for the future of Iran? In this episode:  Maziar Motamedi (@MotamediMaziar), Al Jazeera Iran correspondent  Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jun 1822 min

What will come from the Biden-Putin summit?
All eyes are on Geneva for a summit between Russian President Vladimir Putin and US President Joe Biden. It’s just the latest in a long line of high-profile meetings between US and Russian leaders. And while it’s the first time the two are meeting since Biden took office, they have a history of their own. In this episode, we take a look at the past, present, and future of US-Russian relations.  In this episode:  Journalist Mansur Mirovalev (@mirovalev); Alicia Sanders-Zakre (@azakre), Policy and Research Coordinator at the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (@nuclearban)  Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jun 1621 min

The past, present, and future of Hamas
The Palestinian group Hamas doesn’t fit neatly into the labels some try to fit it into — terrorist, freedom fighter, armed group, political party. On the anniversary of Hamas’s takeover of the Gaza Strip, we’re looking at the context that made the group what it is, and most importantly, how it has affected Palestinians living in Gaza. In this episode: Khaled Al Hroub, Professor of Middle Eastern Studies at Northwestern University Qatar and author of two books about Hamas; Mohammad Alsaafin (@malsaafin), Senior Producer at AJ+ Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jun 1422 min

How Netanyahu shaped Israel
Ousting Benjamin Netanyahu would take a political earthquake and the alliance of parties who’ve banded against him is unprecedented. After four elections in two years, the end of his 12 years in office may have arrived.  As internal tensions rise, how likely is a new political era for Israel? In this episode:  Haggai Matar ( (@Ha_Matar), journalist and executive director for +972 Magazine (@972mag) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jun 1122 min

Naomi Osaka’s battle for mental health on the tennis court
The highest-paid female athlete in the world, tennis superstar Naomi Osaka, decided to leave the French Open at the end of May citing her battle with depression and anxiety. Her withdrawal from the tournament created a media frenzy, and divided journalists and fans. But it has also started a conversation about athletes and mental health that for many is long overdue. In this episode:  Rennae Stubbs (@rennaestubbs), former world #1 in doubles, host of @racqetmagazine podcast, and ESPN commentator  Caitlin Thompson (@caitlin_thomps), journalist, publisher and co-founder of @racqetmagazine  Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jun 919 min

Is Germany's genocide apology to Namibia enough?
From 1904 to 1908, German colonisers waged a brutal extermination campaign against the Herero and Nama people in present-day Namibia. Now, more than a century later, the German government has officially recognised the genocide and has offered Namibia an aid package. But many Herero and Nama people say Germany’s announcement doesn’t come close to providing justice.  In this episode:  Nandiuasora "Nandi" Mazeingo, Chairperson of the Ovaherero Genocide Foundation (@OGF_Namibia) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jun 720 min

Is Ireland changing the consensus on Israel-Palestine?
Ireland is the first EU country to condemn “de facto annexation” of Palestinian land. The two-state solution has been conventional wisdom for a generation. As the Israeli political landscape shifts, does Ireland’s move show that reality is intruding on the international consensus? In this episode:  Shelley Deane (@shelleydeane), Irish political analyst; Omar Baddar (@OmarBaddar), Palestinian American political analyst  Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jun 4
23 min

A Uighur love story, derailed by China's crackdown
Mehray Mezensof's husband is one of an estimated million Uighurs being detained in China.  Several countries accuse China of committing crimes against humanity, including genocide. Starting Friday, a people's tribunal in the UK will meet to decide if that's true. In this episode: Mehray Mezensof (@Mehray_T), wife of a detained Uighur man; Sir Geoffrey Nice, chairman of the Uyghur Tribunal (@TribunalUyghur) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jun 223 min

No normalcy for kids who’ve lost parents to COVID
New research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics estimates that as many as 43,000 children have lost a parent to COVID-19 in the United States. And, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Native Americans, Black Americans, and Latino Americans have been disproportionately affected by coronavirus deaths in the country.  With the US so far ahead in its vaccination rollout, many are looking toward getting back to normal. But, for the families of those affected by the almost 600,000 coronavirus deaths in the country, there’s no way back to normal without their loved ones. They’re struggling with grief, but also financial burdens. In this episode:  Kaelyn Forde, @kaelynforde Rachel Kidman, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Stony Brook Medicine. You can read Kaelyn's reporting here. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 3124 min

What’s behind Colombia’s month of mass protest?
What began as a strike against a tax proposal in Colombia has now escalated into a nationwide protest movement over some of Colombia’s most deep-seated issues. Protesters are demanding structural changes to ease inequality and end police violence. After a month of demonstrations, President Ivan Duque’s popularity has hit record lows, and protesters are staying out in the streets. So what’s behind Colombia’s month of unrest? In this episode:  Al Jazeera correspondent Alessandro Rampietti @Rampietti; Cam Aaron Lopez Duarte @depresssioncherry of @TembloresONG. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 2821 min

The life and death of one Palestinian child
Obaida Akram Jawabra grew up outside of Hebron in the occupied West Bank and dreamed of becoming a chef. When he was 15, his dreams were put on pause for the first time when he was arrested and imprisoned by the Israeli military. He was later acquitted, but spent two months in jail. On May 17th, as many Palestinians were protesting Israeli air strikes on Gaza and Israeli settlers taking over Palestinian homes in East Jerusalem, Obaida, at 17 years old, was shot and killed by Israeli forces. More than 60 other Palestinian children were also killed by Israeli forces in the past month. Today, we take a look at the life of one Palestinian child. In this episode:  Farah Bayadsi, Human Rights Attorney @DCIPalestine Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 2621 min

The rise of Black-Palestinian solidarity
Outreach between Black Lives Matter activists and Palestinians has become more widespread. But the foundation of solidarity between them dates long before Black Lives Matter became a movement. Today, we examine how the Black-Palestinian solidarity came to be and what parallels each side draws from the other. In this episode:  Khury Peterson-Smith (@kpYES), co-founder of Black for Palestine and the Michael Ratner Middle East fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies Sandra Tamari (@SandraTamari1), Executive Director for the Adalah Justice Project Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 2421 min

How activists are fighting homelessness in Los Angeles
Los Angeles, California is home to more than 60,000 homeless people — the second largest unhoused population in the United States. As an end to the pandemic and eviction moratoriums draw nearer, we’re asking: what will it take to resolve LA’s crisis of homelessness? In this episode: Amina Waheed (@atwaheed), Producer at Al Jazeera’s award-winning documentary show Faultlines; Sammy Sumpter, LA resident; Joe Buscaino (@JoeBuscaino), LA councilman; Martha Escudero (@ReclaimingHomes), Activist with Reclaiming our Homes Connect with The Take: Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 2122 min

Surviving on the ground in Gaza
Israeli air strikes in Gaza have killed more than 200 people over the past ten days. Many of us have watched this crisis unfold on our screens, as rockets fire, bombs detonate and buildings collapse.  Today we’re going closer to the ground to speak to the people living in this war zone each and every day. In this episode: Nada Nabil (@NadaNabilHRD), a Gazan human rights activist; Noureddine Abusamra, Gazan resident; Matthias Schmale (@matzschmale) , Gaza Director of UNRWA; Midhat Abbas, Consultant to the Gaza Health Ministry Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 1922 min

African statues and North Korean sanctions
When new statues popped up in a busy intersection in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) no one really said much. A few years later those statues were part of a major investigation led by George Clooney’s The Sentry, an NGO uncovering financial crime. The reason? They were built by a team from North Korea, a country with a long history of statue building and a long list of sanctions against it. Now, the United Nations is trying to enforce statue sanctions but in Central Africa - it can be tough. In this episode:  John Dell'Osso: (@j_dellosso) Financial Crime Investigator, The Sentry (@TheSentry_Org) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 1721 min

Could a patent waiver change the pandemic’s course?
On May 5, the US government decided to throw its weight behind an increasingly-popular WTO measure: waiving intellectual property protections for COVID vaccines. But what is this waiver? And what could it actually mean for people looking to get inoculated? We explain how seemingly-arcane trade negotiations came to mean life and death for the billions of people waiting on a vaccine.  In this episode: Public health activists Achal Prabhala of accessibsa and Priti Krishtel @pritikrishtel of I-MAK @IMAKglobal. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 1419 min

In Sheikh Jarrah, Palestinians confront a city’s future
What started out as protests against forced expulsions in a Palestinian neighborhood has turned into an Israeli crackdown that’s engulfed much of Occupied East Jerusalem, including holy sites like Al Aqsa mosque. But Sheikh Jarrah is just one neighborhood, and displacements are unfolding across the Occupied Territories. As the reverberations in Sheikh Jarrah spread beyond the neighborhood, how will it impact the future of Palestinians in Jerusalem? In this episode:  Rasha, Sheikh Jarrah resident Linah Alsaafin (@LinahAlsaafin), Al Jazeera journalist Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 1223 min

The mobile apps helping Mexican women seek abortion
Feminist groups and activists in Mexico have taken it upon themselves to help women gain access to abortion, in a country where it’s largely illegal. At great risk to their safety, they use social networks to inform women on how to perform “at home” abortions. They’ve taken to the streets and to their cellphones to push back against the law, while helping women find the support they seek. The local efforts come as Mexico’s Supreme Court prepares to discuss the legal merits of cases surrounding abortion in June. In this episode:  Andalusia Knoll Soloff, multimedia journalist in Mexico https://twitter.com/Andalalucha Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 1021 min

Exposing the war in Tigray, Ethiopia
Massacres, gang rapes, forced famine — the list of atrocities being reported in Tigray, Ethiopia is long and growing. Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed declared the military intervention officially over in November, but the situation on the ground clearly doesn’t reflect that. And there are concerns that the situation is starting to resemble a campaign of ethnic cleansing. In this episode: Zecharias Zelalem, Ethiopian journalist (@zekuzelalem); Madiha Raza, Senior Global Communications Officer for Africa and Yemen at the International Rescue Committee (@madz_raza) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 722 min

Denmark tells Syrian refugees it's time to go home
Radwan Fouad Jomaa lives in Denmark with wife and three kids. He moved there from Syria where he was born and raised. After opposing the government of Syrian President Bashar Al Assad, he fled, fearing the worst. Now Denmark is saying his hometown, Damascus, is safe again and he and his family must go home.What will he and hundreds of others like him do? That’s today on The Take. In this episode:  Radwan Fouad Jomaa, Syrian in Denmark Florian Elabidi (@FlorianElabdi) A Danish journalist. He reports about politics, conflicts and migration in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 521 min

For women journalists, an online battlefield
On World Press Freedom Day, the focus is often the heroics of gathering and delivering information in the face of violence. But during a pandemic, it's the online threats that are hitting harder, and women journalists are being hacked, doxxed, deepfaked and threatened all over the world. We're hearing from our own colleagues who’ve faced these threats head on, to ask what we all lose when women journalists are silenced. In this episode:  Kimberly Halkett (@KimberlyHalkett) White House correspondent, Al Jazeera English  Ghada Oueiss (@ghadaoueiss), Presenter, Al Jazeera Arabic Julie Posetti (@julieposetti), Global Director of Research, The International Center for Journalists Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
May 321 min

A Ramadan campaign to free US Muslims behind bars
Innocent until proven guilty is a bedrock of the US legal system. But right now, hundreds of thousands of people are sitting in jail, waiting for trial. For many of them, the only thing that’s keeping them behind bars during a deadly pandemic is a lack of money to pay bail. So how are organizers campaigning to end cash bail while freeing the people it keeps incarcerated? In this episode:  Nabihah Maqbool @nabihah, civil rights lawyer and organizer with @BelieverBailOut. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Apr 3019 min

Dueling narratives on the Rwanda genocide
Two new reports - one commissioned by the French government and one by Rwanda's government - have underscored the role France played in the 1994 Rwandan genocide. But one critic says Rwanda’s President, Paul Kagame’s response to the reports may have more to do with his grip on power than it does on justice. That critic was once part of Kagame’s government but now, he’s gone into hiding. That's this week's episode of The Take. In this episode:  David Himbara (@DavidHimbara), educator, political economist, & development strategist
Apr 2824 min

On the frontlines of India’s second wave of COVID-19
Skyrocketing numbers, new variants, and shortages of every kind. India’s healthcare system is overwhelmed by a devastating second wave of the covid-19 crisis, and there’s no end in sight. Today, we take stock of how India’s doctors and patients are surviving this brutal health crisis. And what comes next. In this episode: Giridhar Babu (@epigiri), Professor of Epidemiology who works with the Public Health Foundation of India; Shraddha Subramanian (@doctorwithoutboundaries), resident doctor at Sassoon General Hospital in Pune; Ravi Mehta (@drravindramehta), chief of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Apollo Hospitals in Bangalore; Ankita Singh (@ankitajessy88), a doctor in Haryana; Anuj Tiwari (@anujtiwari11), a doctor at R. N. Cooper Hospital in Mumbai; and Tanmay Goyal (@tanmaygoyal9), resident of Indore. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Apr 2617 min

In Chad, questions surround a president's sudden death
Elected president one day, declared dead the next. The people of Chad were stunned after the army announced President Idriss Deby died while visiting soldiers fighting a rebel group in the country’s north. Now, a transitional military council has dissolved the constitution and his son has been named interim president. So what happened to Idriss Deby, and what comes next for Chad?  In this episode: Al Jazeera correspondents Hiba Morgan @hiba_morgan and Nicolas Haque @nicolashaque. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Apr 2318 min

On Earth Day, diving for Qatar's other natural resource
What do dugongs and whale sharks reveal about the pandemic? This mostly unexplored wildlife has been hidden off Qatar’s shores throughout years of development. While the pandemic brought most of Qatar to a halt, that wildlife was thriving. This Earth Day, we’re bringing you a story of natural beauty that had been waiting to be told for years, from a correspondent who was grounded in Doha. In this episode: Stefanie Dekker (@StefanieDekker), Al Jazeera correspondent Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Apr 2119 min

What’s happening at the Russia-Ukraine border?
The border region between Russia and Ukraine has been in a long-simmering conflict since 2014. But over the past few weeks, there have been signs things might be escalating. Russia's military has been moving thousands of troops towards the border, while Ukrainian forces prepare for potential action. Could the buildup at the border lead to a full-fledged war? In this episode:  Journalist Mansur Mirovalev (@mirovalev) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Apr 1917 min

Is this the end of the Castro era in Cuba?
For the first time in six decades, Cuba is set to be governed without a Castro at the helm. Raul Castro, the brother of the late Fidel Castro, is expected to step down from his position as First Secretary of the Communist Party this weekend. However, the change comes in the middle of a devastating economic crisis and unprecedented anti-government protests. In this episode:  Lucia Newman (@lucianewman), Aljazeera English Latin American. Editor/Sr Correspondent Rosa María Payá (@RosaMariaPaya), Human Rights Activist and Executive Director of Fundación para la Democracia Panamericana Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Apr 1620 min

Building a world without fast fashion
As people in wealthy countries look toward a vaccinated future, shopping is on the rise, and for many, the tide of fast fashion is pulling in a way that can feel difficult to escape. Love it or hate it, many feel they can’t live without quick and cheap clothes from brands like H&M or Zara. But activist Hoda Katebi and a collective of garment workers in the US city of Chicago have a radical vision for a world without fast fashion, and they’re taking it on with their own worker-owned factory: Blue Tin Productions. In this episode: Hoda Katebi (@hodakatebi), activist Mercy, member of Blue Tin Production Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Apr 1423 min

The deadly consequences of an uneven vaccine rollout
US President Joe Biden has promised every American adult they will be eligible for a COVID vaccination by April 19th. But what about the rest of the world? Only 0.01% of all vaccines distributed have gone to the developing world and now Kenya is being a hit by its 3rd wave of the virus. Many complain COVAX, the vaccine program run by the WHO, isn’t distributing the vaccine quick enough and AstraZeneca has been peppered with problems. Meanwhile, hospitals are running out of oxygen, beds are filling up and people are dying without the vaccine. In this episode: Catherine Soi (@C_SOI), Al Jazeera correspondent Dr. Tom Kenyon (@TomKenyonMD), Chief Health Officer, Project HOPE and former Director of Global Health, US Centers for Disease Control Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Apr 1221 min

In Jordan, Prince Hamzah rifts with his royal brother
Jordan’s King Abdullah II has tried to put to rest a week of royal scandal after his half-brother, former crown Prince Hamzah Bin Hussein, was accused of conspiring to destabilise the country. What does an internal fight reveal about a nation known for its stability? We speak to Al Jazeera’s Hoda Abdel-Hamid to get to the bottom of what sparked the unprecedented royal feud.
Apr 918 min

Exclusive: South Sudan accused of COVID-19 corruption
Threatened aid workers, an empty hospital, and questionable COVID testing. An exclusive investigation by The New Humanitarian and Al Jazeera has uncovered multiple allegations of corruption in South Sudan’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. In this episode:  Sam Mednick, journalist (@sammednick), and Edmund Yakani, civil society activist and head of the Community Empowerment for Progress Organization Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Apr 717 min

Kenya’s latest call to close Dadaab refugee camp
Kenya has hosted Dadaab refugee camp since the 1990s. And those camps have hosted hundreds of thousands of refugees, mainly from Somalia. Dadaab was meant to be temporary, and Kenya’s government is very aware of that. The government called for Dadaab to be shut down last month — something it’s asked for before. What does this mean for the refugees who call Dadaab home? In this episode: Humanitarian journalist Moulid Hujale (@MoulidHujale); Catherine Soi (@C_SOI), Al Jazeera correspondent covering East and Central Africa; Deck Abdullahi Ali Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Apr 520 min

Why are so many migrant children going to the US?
The United States Border Patrol estimates that up to 22,000 children could cross the border with Mexico in April. President Joe Biden promised a more humane treatment of migrants than his predecessor, but images of a crowded migrant processing center in Donna, Texas with thousands of children crammed in small spaces have many questioning his approach. In this episode: Damià S. Bonmatí (@damiabonmati), national correspondent with Telemundo/NBC Universal. For more of Damià's reporting: 'My dream is to meet my dad': They crossed the border alone to reunite with parents En Donna, Texas, las instalaciones de la Patrulla Fronteriza no dan abasto | Noticias Telemundo La angustiosa espera de los migrantes con MPP pese al fin del programa Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Apr 218 min

An alleged rape inside Australia’s parliament
Australia is facing a reckoning on sexual violence, specifically within the field of politics. One woman says she was raped inside Parliament House. In a separate case, the now-former Attorney General has been accused of assault. And many Australians say the government isn’t doing enough to address a culture of toxicity for women in political spaces. The growing protest movement calls for change — in all communities, and for all women. In this episode: Kate Walton (@waltonkate), feminist activist and writer; Priyanka Tilve (@ptilve), The Take producer Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 3120 min

Muslims in France contend with a shifting center
When France's President Emmanuel Macron announced a controversial bill on “Islamist separatism” last year, members of the country’s Muslim population worried about what would happen next. Now, the bill has reached the Senate. As France's politicians try to outmaneuver each other from the right, what impact will their politicking have on a community that's found itself at the heart of this debate? In this episode: Yasser Louati (@yasserlouati), human rights and civil liberties activist at the Justice and Liberties For All Committee (@justicelibertes) and host of Le Breakdown; historian Christelle Rabier (@ChRabier) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 2922 min

Who is Alexey Navalny, really?
Alexey Navalny is a man with many titles: Russian dissident, opposition leader, activist, investigator, lawyer. Russian President Vladimir Putin reportedly refuses to say his name. But this larger-than-life persona leaves out a crucial part of Navalny’s past — his history of nationalism. In this episode: Journalists Mansur Mirovalev (@mirovalev) and Natalia Antonova (@NataliaAntonova) Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 2620 min

Biden, Guantanamo, and Mohammed al-Qahtani
After nearly 20 years at Guantanamo Bay with no charges against him, Mohammed al-Qahtani has what some attorneys describe as ‘generations’ of lawyers defending him. Last year, he was the closest he’d ever been to going home. But Donald Trump’s administration changed that and this week, President Joe Biden will have a chance to reverse that decision. What this administration does will send a signal about their resolve to close the US military prison for good. In this episode: Ramzi Kassem, a Professor of Law at the City University of New York; Shezza Abboushi Dallal (@ShezzaADallal) and Dana Jabri (@d_jabri), student attorneys at CLEAR. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 2421 min

Will Biden end the student debt crisis?
Americans have some of the highest rates of student debt in the world, and 92 percent of it belongs to the US government. That means President Joe Biden could erase the debt with the stroke of a pen, and some activists are going on a ‘debt strike’ to urge him to do so. As Biden takes a victory lap from passing a massive economic stimulus bill, activists and some politicians are ready for the next fight: cancelling student debt. In this episode: Thomas Gokey, co-founder of The Debt Collective Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 2221 min

Sarah Everard’s murder sparks moment of reckoning in UK
Sarah Everard was a 33-year-old marketing executive. She went missing while walking home from a friend’s house on the evening of March 3rd in South London. A London Metropolitan Police officer has been charged with her kidnap and murder. Sarah's killing, her alleged murderer, and the events that followed have spawned an outcry in the UK about violence against women, police brutality, and the right to protest. In this episode: Jamie Klingler (@jamieklingler), organizer of Reclaim These Streets; Ash Sarkar, (@AyoCaesar), contributing editor for Novara Media (@novaramedia). Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 1920 min

The dark side of Bitcoin's meteoric rise
Bitcoin is having a moment. The cyber currency broke through its own record this past weekend with each bitcoin valued at over $60,000 USD. That’s more than two times Bitcoin’s value at the start of the year. If FOMO is getting the best of you, consider this: Bitcoin may be making some investors fabulously rich, right now at least, but at what cost to people, and the planet? In this episode: Guest host Patricia Sabga, managing business editor for Al Jazeera Digital; Ben Piven (@benpiven), journalist covering economics and the environment for Al Jazeera Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 1720 min

10 years on, Syrians hope for justice – in Germany
The first trial of crimes against humanity in Syria is taking place — but not at the International Criminal Court. 10 years after the first protests in Syria, a tiny spark of accountability has been lit, with the trial of two Syrians who first came to Germany seeking asylum. On the anniversary of Syria’s uprising, we hear from a reporter who’s been inside the courthouse nearly every day of a harrowing trial, and from a woman who’s staged her own vigil outside of it. In this episode: Wafa Mustafa (@WafaMustafa9), Syrian activist; Hannah El-Hitami (@hannahel711), journalist in Berlin, Germany. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 1519 min

Myanmar protesters face 'killing spree'
More than 70 protesters have been killed and nearly 2,000 detained since early February when the protest against the military coup began in Myanmar. Amnesty International says many of the killings documented amount to “extrajudicial execution” by military security forces. Still, some say the coup has not succeeded yet. Today, we talk to a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist living in Yangon about how protesters are fighting back, and what the military is doing to silence them. In this episode: Aye Min Thant (@the_ayeminthant), blogger and journalist in Myanmar. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 1220 min

A year of pandemic and inequality
A year ago this week, the coronavirus outbreak was officially declared a pandemic. Now, Pfizer, a leading vaccine manufacturer, is being accused of bullying governments with negotiation tactics so harsh that deals have been delayed or flat out refused. On the anniversary of the pandemic, we’re discussing the Pfizer controversy, and taking stock of the global inequities from COVID-19. In this episode: Madlen Davies (@madlendavies), global health correspondent at The Bureau of Investigative Journalism Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 1020 min

Women who work(ed), in their own voices
International Women’s Day is inextricable from women’s labor, but the pandemic has pushed unprecedented numbers of women out of the workforce around the globe. For women still working, the pandemic has divided those who work at home from those who don’t. We hear from women in different parts of the world, from a psychiatrist for new mothers, a sex workers’ advocate, and one of Al Jazeera’s own journalists. In this episode: Dr. Zainab Imam, perinatal psychiatrist; Phelister Abdalla, the National Coordinator of the Kenya Sex Workers Alliance (KESWA); Xanthe Scharff (@XantheScharff), CEO & Cofounder @FullerProject; Rania Zabaneh (@RZabaneh), Al Jazeera producer in the occupied West Bank. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 816 min

Can snap elections calm protests in Armenia?
The streets of Armenia are hot with protest, as several military generals and hundreds of protesters are demanding the resignation of Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan over his handling of last year’s deadly conflict in the Nagorno-Karabakh region. After accusing the military of a coup attempt, Pashinyan is calling for early elections and proposing a referendum to adopt a new constitution. But will that be enough to calm the opposition and keep himself in office? In this episode: Richard Giragosian (@Richard_RSC), director of the Regional Studies Center, an independent think tank in Armenia's capital. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 515 min

The Khashoggi report tests US-Saudi relations
Two and a half years after the killing of Saudi critic and Washington Post columnist, Jamal Khashoggi, the United States has released its official report. The report states that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman approved the operation that led to his killing. But in the days since the report, the Biden administration has resisted sanctioning the Saudi leader. We hear from the author of a 2019 United Nations investigation on Khashoggi’s killing on what she found in the US report, and what she thinks is missing in order to serve justice for Khashoggi. In this episode: Agnes Callamard (@AgnesCallamard), UN Special Rapporteur on extra-judicial executions. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 316 min

In Somalia, a US bureaucrat fights to hold onto power
Somalia is weeks overdue for a presidential election. The president’s term has expired without a successor in place. At the center of the crisis is President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed, better known as Farmaajo, a former US dual citizen whose previous job was as a local bureaucrat. Four years ago, he was a new hope for the Somali people. This election was supposed to be a triumphant milestone for Somalia, a sign of stability. But instead, there’s a power vacuum that risks spiraling into conflict. In this episode: Hamza Mohamed (@Hamza_Africa), Al Jazeera journalist. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Mar 118 min

Iran and the United States try to get back to the table
Days before a US airstrike hit “Iranian-backed targets” in Syria, Iran and the US were trying to get back to the negotiating table. This week is the closest the two nations have come to returning to the nuclear deal. It’s also the closest Iran has been to seeing an end to the latest round of US sanctions — sanctions that began with Donald Trump after he withdrew the US from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. But it has not been an easy start.  This episode has been updated to incorporate recent news events. In this episode: Maziar Motamedi (@MotamediMaziar), Iran correspondent for @AJEnglish Digital; Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 2618 min

Colombia’s response to Venezuela’s humanitarian crisis
More than 5 million Venezuelans have fled the country — and almost half of them are in Colombia. Nearly 2 million people are living in the neighboring country without stability or visas. Now, the Colombian government is offering an alternative to Venezuelans living there. Colombian President Iván Duque hopes this measure will get the country international help for one of the largest humanitarian crises in the world. We hear about this possible path to legal residency from an Al Jazeera correspondent, and from Venezuelans currently in Colombia. In this episode: Alessandro Rampietti (@rampietti), Al Jazeera journalist in Bogotá, Colombia. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 2416 min

What an Ebola outbreak reveals about vaccine inequity
Two viruses, two vaccines, one unequal system: Guinean health officials declared an Ebola epidemic after reporting the first cases of the virus since West Africa’s deadly outbreak ended in 2016. One thing that’s changed since that last outbreak: the availability of a vaccine. But like we’ve seen with the coronavirus pandemic, the existence of a vaccine doesn’t necessarily mean access to one. In this episode: Nicolas Haque (@nicolashaque), Al Jazeera journalist; Gladys Archange, Guinea country representative for Catholic Relief Services. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 2216 min

Texas freezes, and the US rejoins the Paris Accord
Blackouts and power outages are happening in Texas just as climate activists in the United States celebrate the country’s re-entry into the Paris Climate Accord. After a year of grounded flights and limited travel, global emissions are barely lower than before the COVID-19 pandemic. And the disastrous effects are clear, not just in the US, but around the world. In today’s episode we’re asking, is the Paris Agreement doing enough to protect the planet? In this episode: Dr. Richard Munang (@RichardMunang), UN African regional climate change coordinator; Kofi Mawuli Klu, joint chief coordinator for the Extinction Rebellion International Solidarity Network (@XRIntSol); Dina Kesbeh (@dinakesbeh), The Take producer Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 1920 min

Why Yemen’s Houthis spent 29 days on a US "terror" list
Designating Yemen’s Houthi rebels as a "foreign terrorist organization" was one of the last foreign policy decisions of the Trump administration. It was a move that many aid agencies feared would push the worst humanitarian crisis in the world into further chaos. Now, weeks later, the new administration under President Joe Biden has walked it back. So just how big a shift is this for US policy toward Yemen, and what does it mean for Yemen’s war? In this episode: Abubakr Al-Shamahi (@abubakrabdullah), journalist; Sultana Begum (@sultanabegums), Norwegian Refugee Council Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 1715 min

A wave of killings against transgender people in Puerto Rico
Forty-four transgender or gender non-conforming people were fatally shot or killed in the US in 2020. Six of those people were killed in Puerto Rico alone. This January, the island's governor Pedro Pierluisi declared a state of emergency and signed an executive order to address the killings. Today we are talking to activists in Puerto Rico and a journalist who has covered the gruesome crimes. In this episode: Pedro Julio Serrano (@PedroJulio), founder of Puerto Rico Para Tod@s; Ivana Fred Millán, activist; David Cordero Mercado (@David_cmercado), investigative journalist Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 1518 min

Rules of engagement when talking to conspiracists
Between anti-vaxxers, Covid-truthers, and QAnon, conspiracy theorists seem to be having a moment. But having productive conversations about these theories is easier said than done. In this episode, social psychologist Jovan Byford explains why conspiracy theories spread during moments of upheaval, and shares his advice for talking to people who believe in them. In this episode: Dr. Jovan Byford, senior lecturer in psychology, Open University Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 1219 min

How did the QAnon conspiracy go global?
For people outside the US, QAnon seemed like a uniquely American threat — up until it wasn’t. The digital cult was born on the corners of the internet in 2017, but its adherents have taken offline action in several countries. So how does a baseless conspiracy theory that says Donald Trump is battling a cabal of child-trafficking elites find its way around the world? In this episode: Aoife Gallagher (@aoifegall), analyst at the Institute for Strategic Dialogue; Rudy Bouma (@rudybouma), journalist at Nieuwsuur Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 1027 min

The ‘Facebook revolutions’ that weren’t
Social media was how many of us consumed the 2011 Arab uprisings. Technology was putting power in the hands of the people. To use social media in 2021, especially in the Middle East, is to navigate a maze of internet laws, surveillance, censorship, fake news, and bots. With Facebook now looking for ways to make political content less visible, we’re asking: what changed? In this episode: Mohamad Najam (@monajem), executive director of SMEX, a digital rights organization in Beirut, Lebanon; Jillian C. York (@jilliancyork), director for International Freedom of Expression at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 819 min

All the Prime Minister's Men
An explosive investigation reveals how a criminal gang is colluding with the security forces of Bangladesh and has links to the country’s Prime Minister, Sheikh Hasina. All the Prime Minister’s Men is a gripping, true-crime podcast series about a high-level cover-up happening right now in Bangladesh. We hear Malika Bilal talk to the host of Al Jazeera Investigates, Kevin Hirten, on how the AJ I-unit exposed the corrupt and ongoing relationship between a criminal gang of brothers and the country’s leader. In this episode: Kevin Hirten (@kdhirten), host of Al Jazeera Investigates podcast. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 523 min

Waking up to military rule in Myanmar
In the early hours of Monday morning, Myanmar’s military detained de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi and several other members of the National League of Democracy party, taking control of the country’s government. This means Myanmar is under military rule again, just as it was from 1962 until 2011. What might the future look like for the people of Myanmar, many of whom have lived under military rule before? We speak with a Rohingya activist who has seen first-hand what Myanmar’s military is capable of. In this episode: Wai Wai Nu (@waiwainu), Rohingya human rights activist, founder of Women's Peace Network (@WomensPeaceNW). Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 316 min

Can Black businesswomen save the US economy?
As Black History Month kicks off in the US, we’re turning our focus to one subset of the community: black female entrepreneurs. They face some of the highest hurdles when trying to start their own businesses, and when the COVID-19 pandemic derailed thousands of firms around the US, they received some of the least support from the US government. Today, we’re talking about why that was the case, and what some women are doing to change the system. In this episode: Anna Gifty Opoku Agyeman (@itsafronomics), economist and co-founder of the Sadie Collective; Nikki Porcher, founder of the non-profit Buy From A Black Woman (@BFABWInfo); Shanae Jones, founder of Ivy’s Tea Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Feb 124 min

After Desert Storm: Baghdad, and the aftermath (Part 3)
In the final episode of our series on Operation Desert Storm, we’re telling the story of the war in Baghdad, and where this military operation has left the region 30 years later. Has it all gone to ashes, or are there a few things that have survived? We speak with the people we’ve met through this series to hear what they saw and felt during those tumultuous weeks of war, how it's affected their lives today, and impacted the region and the world. In this episode: Odai Al Najjar, Al Jazeera news editor; Salah Nasrawi, former Baghdad correspondent for Associated Press ; Nasser Al Hussainan, Retired Vice Admiral of the Kuwaiti Navy; Abdulwahab Al Qassab, Retired Major General, Iraqi Armed Forces; Eric T Olson, Retired Admiral, US Special Operations Command; Kate Adie, former BBC chief correspondent Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 2930 min

After Desert Storm: US-led bombing of Baghdad (Part 2)
Operation Desert Storm seemed like a quick victory for the United States. But looking back, it may have had very different consequences. In part one of our three-part series, we told you the story of how Iraq invaded Kuwait. In our second episode, we head to Baghdad and hear from the people who lived through the war, and how they tried to make it to the other side. In this episode: Odai Al Najjar, Al Jazeera news editor; Salah Nasrawi, former Baghdad correspondent for Associated Press ; Nasser Al Hussainan, Retired Vice Admiral of the Kuwaiti Navy; Abdulwahab Al Qassab, Retired Major General, Iraqi Armed Forces; Eric T Olson, Retired Admiral, US Special Operations Command; Kate Adie, former BBC chief correspondent Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 2724 min

After Desert Storm: Iraq invades Kuwait (Part 1)
Thirty-one years ago, Iraq invaded Kuwait on a hot August morning. A few months later on January 16, 1991, the United States military launched its first major war in the Middle East: Operation Desert Storm. This is the first episode in a three-part series telling the story of that war from the perspective of the people who were there, on the ground. They are people you probably haven’t heard from before: an Iraqi General, a Kuwaiti Naval Commander and the highest ranking US Navy Seal involved in Desert Storm, just to name a few. This war was the start of something — the story of the United States in the Middle East today. In this episode: Salah Nasrawi, former Baghdad correspondent for Associated Press ; Nasser Al Hussainan, Retired Vice Admiral of the Kuwaiti Navy; Abdulwahab Al Qassab, Retired Major General, Iraqi Armed Forces; Eric T Olson, Retired Admiral, US Special Operations Command; Kate Adie, former BBC chief correspondent Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 2530 min

Can the United States be united once more?
President Joseph Biden has officially assumed the presidency, inheriting a deeply divided nation, a polarized Congress, and an economy severely impacted by COVID-19. While the transfer of power was seemingly peaceful, that doesn't mean supporters of Donald Trump are pledging their allegiance to the 46th President. How might that determine the landscape of politics in the US? In this episode:  Josh Rushing (@joshrushing), senior correspondent for Al Jazeera’s Fault Lines. For more: The End of a Presidency: Trump’s Loss in a Divided America Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 2229 min

Special episode: After inauguration, what’s next for the US?
Donald Trump is leaving office today as Joseph Biden assumes the presidency and command over a deeply divided nation. But the transfer of power is taking place under military presence as scores of National Guard troops patrol the U.S. Capitol and Washington, DC. In today's episode, we’ve got a roundup of Al Jazeera journalists seeking answers to the questions that will shape the next chapter of US history. In this episode: Guest host Patty Sagba; Asia Business editor Azhar Sukri; international correspondent Hoda Abdel-Hamid; and US political editor Steve Chaggaris. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 2036 min

Are Hollywood executives complicit in Latinx exclusion?
Members of the Latinx community have perpetually remained underrepresented in front and behind Hollywood’s cameras. This past year, shows centering Latina, Latino and Latinx stories, like One Day at a Time, Vida, and Gentefied, were ignored at major awards shows. Now, creators are demanding more, as 270 producers, writers and show runners signed a letter calling for systematic change in the industry. In today’s episode, we speak to two of the letter’s signees to explore why Latinx shows are undervalued, and why these creators are pushing for diversity in entertainment. In this episode: Gloria Calderón Kellett (@everythingloria), co-show-runner and co-creator of One Day at a Time; Marvin Lemus (@ElMarvinLemus), show-runner of Gentefied. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 1826 min

After decades, an abortion victory in Argentina
In a milestone win, Argentina’s Senate voted to legalize abortion, granting millions of women access to legal elective abortions until the 14th week of pregnancy. We’re revisiting an episode we first aired in March to take a deep dive into the decades-long fight to secure abortion rights, and to understand how the green wave movement secured the decriminalization of abortion in a majority Roman Catholic country and homeland of Pope Francis. In this episode: Teresa Bo (@TeresaBo), Al Jazeera journalist covering Latin America. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 1522 min

Why the blockade against Qatar is ending now
After years of dispute, there was a breakthrough at the Gulf Cooperation Council summit. In June 2017, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Egypt announced a blockade on Qatar. The countries released a list of 13 demands to be met for the embargo to end. The dispute remained at a virtual standstill until last week, when the blockade was finally lifted. After more than three years of embargo by land, air, and sea, why is the GCC dispute coming to an end now? In this episode: Gregory Gause, Professor of International Relations at the Bush School of Government, Texas A&M University; and Jim Krane (@jimkrane), Energy Fellow at Rice University's Baker Institute  Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 1318 min

We’re asking, again, will the president be prosecuted?
In the aftermath of the January 6 insurrection on the United States Capitol, many are asking, what’s next? Will President Donald Trump be punished for his role in encouraging the riots? What kind of punishment is possible for a President of the United States? We asked similar questions several months ago about President Trump's other pending legal cases. In today’s episode, we have an update to those questions. Hear what is possible while he remains in office, and what could happen once Donald Trump is no longer president of the United States. In this episode: Conor Shaw (@ConorMarcusShaw), senior policy and litigation fellow at Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, DC (@CREWcrew) For more: Prosecuting a president, our first episode on the subject Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 1118 min

The ignored warnings of the US Capitol insurrection
Much of the country, and world, is shocked over the storming of the US Capitol in Washington, DC on January 6. In today’s episode, journalists and activists describe their experience covering and witnessing the insurrection. We hear experts analyze the contrast between the lack of police preparedness and response to Trump loyalists versus Black Lives Matter protesters last year. And we ask all of them to consider what Wednesday's events mean for the future of US democracy. In this episode: Journalists reporting from the US Capitol, Patty Culhane and John Hendren for Al Jazeera, and Tia Mitchell with the Atlanta Journal Constitution; Washington, DC-based activist Cirilo Manego; Attorney General for the District of Columbia, Karl Racine; Andre Perry, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution; anthropologist Steve Gardiner; former CIA officer Glenn Carle Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 822 min

Love in the time of COVID-19
How do you date during COVID? Well, it's different than it used to be. Some people are using Zoom along with dating apps, but others have just given up. Could your romantic life affect your health and the health of other people? We talk to a researcher who says yes, it can. And we hear from people trying to make it work during a trying time. In this episode: Richard Slatcher (@RelationScience) social psychologist studying relationships at the University of Georgia. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 628 min

A soundtrack for US police reform
Chicago community organizer and artist Rami Nashashibi started writing the song “Mama Please” as a tribute to the memory of George Floyd. Over time, and with the help of musicians Drea d’Nur and Jecorey Arthur it evolved into a song about injustice in the US and abroad. And it’s dedicated to a former New York State police officer who was fired when she intervened to stop another officer’s chokehold. We talked to the artists, and former officer Cariol Horne, for a look into their work to fight for justice. In this episode: Singer and music producer, Drea d’Nur (@drea_dnur); artist and executive director of Inner-City Muslim Action Network, Rami Nashashibi (@RamiNashashibi), and former police officer and current activist, Cariol Horne (@cariolslaw). Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 421 min

Why African descendants are moving to Africa
Citing racism and a desire for belonging, Americans and Britons of African descent are moving from the West to the African continent. It’s part of a Pan-African campaign to encourage repatriation and investment in tourism in Africa, and it’s a trend that culminated in 2019 with Ghana’s Year of Return, which marked 400 years since the first enslaved people from Africa were brought to the Americas. We speak to two women about their decision to leave the US and the UK to move to Ghana and The Gambia for good. In this episode: Muhammida El Muhajir, Ghana resident since 2014; Juliet Ryan, co-founder of the Council of African Descendants in The Gambia, and host of Bla Xit on YouTube. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Jan 119 min

20 in 2020: An indigenous activist’s search for sound
Xiuhtezcatl had a lot planned for 2020, including a nationwide tour for his new album, and continuing his environmental justice work. Like most of us, he hadn’t planned on a global pandemic bringing everything to a halt. In the final episode of our ‘20 in 2020’ series, we hear from the indigenous organizer on how this summer's anti-racism protests and the relationships he made during isolation impacted his year. In this episode: Xiuhtezcatl (@xiuhtezcatl), musician and activist. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Dec 202020 min

20 in 2020: A young innovator’s lessons in optimism
Jeremiah Thoronka has faced many difficult challenges — from Sierra Leone's civil war, the Ebola outbreak, the passing of family members, and now facing the coronavirus pandemic far from home. But at just 20 years old, the UN fellow and budding scientist has turned trash into clean energy, and has learned how to confront the challenges of a distressing year to work for a better tomorrow. This is the fourth episode in our ‘20 in 2020’ series — a snapshot of a global generation coming of age in an unprecedented year. In this episode: Jeremiah Thoronka, Sierra Leonean student in Kigali, Rwanda, and United Nations Millennium Fellow. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Dec 202017 min

A fight for survival among Chile’s indigenous people
It’s a story you may have not heard: the eternal conflict of an indigenous nation fighting against government and industry for recognition and rights. This year, the ongoing land struggle between the Chilean government and the Mapuche nation has become more violent than ever before, and the path to de-escalation is muddy and fraught. In this episode: Lucia Newman (@lucianewman), Al Jazeera correspondent in Chile. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Dec 202024 min

20 in 2020: From isolation to mass protest in Poland
Kajetan Chlipalski says 2020 is his year of emotional changes. He’s lived through some formative moments in his life this year, but many of them alone, from home. He’s also taking part in the biggest protests his country has seen in decades. We're talking to the 20-year-old student on what he's learned about people during this isolating year. This episode is the third in our series, ‘20 in 2020’ — a snapshot of a global generation coming of age in an unprecedented year. In this episode: Kajetan Chlipalski, Polish student, feminist, and activist Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Dec 202018 min

The haves and have nots of the COVID-19 vaccine
We keep hearing about the first COVID-19 vaccines being distributed in the United Kingdom and United States — but what about everyone else? When will the rest of the world be vaccinated? We check in with Al Jazeera correspondents from Baghdad to Beijing on when people there will start vaccinating, and what can be done to get more vaccines distributed. In this episode: Zain Rizvi, law and policy researcher for Public Citizen; Al Jazeera journalists Manuel Rapalo in Mexico City; Elizabeth Puranam in Delhi; Jessica Washington in Jakarta; Malcolm Webb in Nairobi; Katrina Yu in Beijing; Charles Stratford in Baghdad; and Dr. Zaher Sahloul, President of MedGlobal. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Dec 202029 min

Rohingya refugees are being displaced, again
Bangladesh has relocated more than 1,700 Rohingya refugees from crowded camps in the country's southeast to Bhasan Char, an island prone to flooding — and they intend to relocate thousands more. The Bangladeshi government says the relocations are voluntary, though human rights groups say people are being coerced to move to an island where the conditions are so poor it may lead to a new crisis. It has been difficult to gain access to the island, so we’re speaking with an Al Jazeera correspondent who has been covering, and keeping in touch with the Rohingya. In this episode: Mohammed Jamjoom (@MIJamjoom), Al Jazeera Senior Correspondent Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Dec 202017 min

20 in 2020: In Palestine, from prison to pandemic
Ahed Tamimi was just 16 when she slapped an Israeli soldier in her village in the Occupied West Bank. She served eight months in Israeli prison and became an icon of Palestinian resistance to some, and a troublemaker and provocateur to others. Now she is almost 20, and rather than being out at university or protesting with her village, she’s been stuck inside four walls at home due to the coronavirus pandemic. And outside Palestine, a lot has changed, as Arab countries continue to normalize relations with Israel. This episode is the second in our series, 20 in 2020 — a snapshot of a global generation coming of age in an unprecedented year. In this episode: Ahed Tamimi, Palestinian activist For more: Ahed Tamimi: Palestine's freedom fighter | AJ+ Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Dec 202021 min

The budget cuts that have Guatemalans “fed up”
A budget bill has pushed thousands of Guatemalans into the streets every Saturday since November to demand their government do better by its citizens. Public frustration has been targeted at President Alejandro Giammattei over $13 billion in cuts to education and health, all while millions are struggling to recuperate after the devastation left by Hurricanes Eta and Iota. We’re taking a deep dive into what’s behind protester's demands, and why corruption seems to be at the root of it. In this episode: Jose Zamora (@jczamora), Guatemalan journalist in Miami, Florida Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)
Dec 202023 min

Why India’s farmers promise to step up protests
Farmers in India went through tear gas and water cannons to block key highways into Delhi for the last two weeks. They’re protesting a series of reforms that will open up the country’s agriculture sector to private corporations — and open farmers up to potential exploitation. We find out why thousands of farmers have left their homes during a pandemic to demand an end to these laws. In this episode: Elizabeth Puranam (@LizPuranam), Al Jazeera journalist in Delhi, India. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod).
Dec 202017 min

20 in 2020: From New York to Islamabad
Rehmat Zafar’s family is spread out across the world: Her parents are in Islamabad; her sister’s in Nairobi and her brother’s in New York. In 2020, that’s been hard. Rehmat’s trying to find her feet in a year where nothing has gone according to plan. This episode is the first in our series, ‘20 in 2020’ — a snapshot of a global generation coming of age in an unprecedented year. In this episode: Rehmat Zafar, 20, graphic design student. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod).
Dec 202019 min

Why was Iran's top nuclear scientist assassinated?
Many Iranians had no idea who Mohsen Fakhrizadeh was when he was assassinated at the end of November. But intelligence services in Israel and the United States had been tracking Iran's top nuclear scientist for years. So what happened that day, and what will it mean for Iran? We’re exploring Fakhrizadeh’s story, and the future of US-Iran relations as the US transitions from a Donald Trump administration to Joe Biden. In this episode: Maziar Motamedi (@MotamediMaziar), Al Jazeera journalist in Tehran, Iran. Connect with The Take:  Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod).
Dec 202024 min

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