JSTOR
How to Use Your Free Reads with an Individual Account
Updated 2 months ago
What's in this Article:
How to Start Reading for Free
When you have a free personal JSTOR account, you can read 6 articles online for free every 30 days (Note we are temporarily increasing the number of articles you can read online for free from 6 to 100). When you click on an article, there is a banner at the top of the page that tells you how many free article reads you have remaining for the period. Please note that not all articles are included in the free online reading program.
  1. To get started, create a free personal account.
  2. Search for articles (results will default to content you can access).
  3. Click the "Alternate access options" button underneath the title of the article then select the "Read Online" option (only eligible articles will include this option).
  4. Once you've clicked "Read Online," you will see an arrow appear to the right of the article viewer
  5. Click these arrows to "turn the page" to read! As soon as you click "Read Online," you have 30 days to read this article, plus 5 others, for free.
Quick Tip: Did you know your personal account can also help you organize your research? Read more about how in our article: My Workspace for Organizing Research.
How to Find Articles You've Read in the Past:
You read an article, and now you need to reference it again. There is a record of the articles you have read under the "Free Article Views" section of your personal account. (Make sure that you're logged in to be able to see this section. You can confirm that you're logged in if you see your name in the top right corner of the page).
To find your articles, hover over or click on your name, and select "Free Article Views" from the menu that opens.
You can also click "Free Article Views" on the left side of the screen if you are in your profile view: 
You will be redirected to your "Free Article Views" page, where you will be able to click on the article titles you've selected to read them again. 
Note that under "Free Article Views," you can see how long it will be until your 6 article reads reset. You can read 6 articles every 30 days (Note we are temporarily increasing the number of articles you can read online for free from 6 to 100). From the first time you click "Read Online" to read an article, you have 30 days to use the remaining 5 article reads before the counter resets and you can read 6 more articles. In other words, if you read your first article on April 15th, your 30 day period begins, and will reset on May 15th. If you read another article within the same period, say on April 30th, your reset counter is not affected--your counter will still reset on May 15th, and you have until then to read your remaining articles.
What happens when your countdown ends/How can I remove articles?
While it is not possible to "remove" items from your "Free Article Views" until your 30 days count resets, after 30 days, you can then read another 6 articles for free within a new period (Note we are temporarily increasing the number of articles you can read online for free from 6 to 100).
Afraid of losing your research? Fear not: when the 30 days is up, all of the articles you have read online will move to "Previously viewed articles" on the same "Free Article Views" page so that you don't lose your research. If you want to read the same article again, you can click on that article, then use another view for that new period.
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18 comments
Jccb0716
3 years ago
I am unsure if I wish to participate in a program that I did not have the opportunity to choose therfore i wish to withdraw and suspend any further progress until I decide if this progam is something I can consider.
 
Regards
 
John burke
1
Bonnie
3 years ago
Hi John! That's completely fair. We'll follow up with you via email to make sure we've taken all the steps you're requesting to withdraw your account with JSTOR. 
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Jongailb%tds Net
3 years ago
I would like to read the 30 page article before I make a commitment to purchase it. But I can't understand the steps needed to access the article. I am not a student only doing private research. 
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Bonnie
3 years ago
Hi Jon! It looks like you already have a free account with JSTOR, which is great! That's the first step to being able to see content for free. Go ahead and sign in to your MyJSTOR account: https://www.jstor.org/action/showLogin
The next step is finding the article you want to read. If is has a "read online" button next to the title, click that, and you'll be able to read the article online. To turn the page, click the right arrow button that appears to the right of the article text.
Note that not ALL articles on JSTOR participate in the free program. If you're not sure whether the article you want to read participates, check with us by emailing support@jstor.org.
Hope this helps!
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Julio Torres
3 years ago Edited
It seems that they changed, again, the format of the page. This is annoying, since now I can not consult online, an article of the Mexicon Magazine, because I do not find the option to "read online" ... What do I have to do to consult it?... Until my last consultation with Mexicon, a month ago, I had no problem consulting your articles.
Why are we doing this to independent researchers?
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margie bold
3 years ago
Hello, there is no "Read Online" option for any articles that I click on?
What should I do? As this is extremely frustrating and I am unable to comprehend this new format at all!
Margie
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Mark Bowron
3 years ago
26 times 14 equals 364, so 3 times 26 equals 78 articles per year under the previous arrangement.  6 articles per month comes out to 72 articles per year under the current arrangement.  How does that square with the assertion that "you can read more articles, more easily" now?
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Angela
3 years ago Edited
Julio and Margie, 
Thank you for reporting the error with not being able to read content online for free! We have just applied a fix to this error, you may need to close and reopen your browser for the fix be reflected on the page. Please email support@jstor.org if you are still experiencing problems.
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Angela
3 years ago
Mark,
You are correct that you have a few less total articles available in an entire year. “Read more articles, more easily” was meant to be in reference to the fact that more articles could be read at any given time per month. For example, previously, if you signed up for a MyJSTOR account, you would only be able to read 3 articles before reaching the article limit. Now, you can read 6 articles immediately before hitting that limit. I apologize for any confusion this caused, we have rewritten the text there to make that more clear.
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peace enwerem
3 years ago
What are the factors that have fostered globalization of capital flows
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Jccb0716
3 years ago
THis is my personal feedback 
When i first discovered j stor some years ago  i found the search and reading of cases simple stupid and convenient immediate access to the case law for review, it then progressed to providing 4/5 cases of similar facts.
however now I find that the use of J stor for reference has  become a design program for some boffin who created and/or changed what was an excellent simple medium with immediate results.
It may satisfy students who wish to be engrossed in a complicated system that does not provide the results quickly which were readily available prior to the overhaul of a very satisfactory system.
I will not and possibly many others will stop the continued use of this new program.
"If it aint broke don't fix it"
Regards
John Burke  
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Bonnie
3 years ago
Hi John! We really appreciate that you took the time to send us your thoughts. We're a learning organization, so all of the changes we made to the free program, we made based on research conducted with our users. All this to say, we definitely had the best intentions with this new "My Workspace" feature. 
If you're having trouble using My Workspace, please let us know and we'll be happy to walk you through it. 
Also, if you have other thoughts about this feature, could you email us at support@jstor.org and let us know what thoughts you have about how we can make it better?
Again, thanks for taking the time to share with us. Have a great day!
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Myron Samsin
3 years ago
Hey there, in the old system I had items in the free "permanent shelf", the one where you could switch items in and out but never have more than two (or three) at the same time. They are wiped and gone now. My "past history" in the new system doesn't show what they were, because I *have* no past history in the new system.  I don't remember what they were.  That's why I *kept* them there, so I wouldn't have to keep track in some other way of what they were.
So, what can you do for me?  If anything.
Thx.
 
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Bonnie
3 years ago
Hi Myron! We're very sorry about this. Earlier this year when the change to the new free reading program took place, we were able to restore your "shelf" history for a period of time, but unfortunately we're not able to retrieve that information any longer. This is kind of a long-shot, but you might be able to see the articles you've viewed in the past in your browser history if you haven't cleared your history in a while.
We'd really like to hear more of your feedback about this process and change to the platform, so if you have any more thoughts, or need help with anything else, email us at support@jstor.org
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22rp0557
2 years ago
I am a student and my school is registered with Jstor. Why can I only read 6 articles a month when my school is paying for unlimited access to the things I use Jstor for?
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Bonnie
2 years ago
Hi 22rp0557! The 6 free articles are for independent researchers, not members of a school. If you're seeing the "red banner" that tells you that you have 6 free articles, that just means you're not logged in to your school's account. I'll follow up with you via email to make sure you can get logged in. 
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do7mera
2 years ago
Hello,
I have read an article months before. Can i read it again as a free article another month? or there is only one time limit for every article? because I am trying to read it again and there is no ''read online'' button.
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Bonnie
2 years ago
Hi do7mera there is no limit to how many times you can read something for free on the site. I'll send you an email so we can figure out what's going on here!
0
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How to register & get free access to content
How to Use Your Free Reads with an Individual Account
Open Access Content: Free Content on JSTOR
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