87 captures
07 Sep 2003 - 11 Feb 2021
About this capture
   
  FILMS
NMAI Signature Film: A Thousand Roads
11:30 a.m., 1:30 and 3:30 p.m.
Daily

Rasmuson Theater

 
DAILY unless otherwise noted.
(2005, 43 min.) U.S. Director: Chris Eyre (Cheyenne/Arapaho). Writers: Scott Garen and Joy Harjo (Mvskoke/Creek). Produced by Barry Clark and Scott Garen for the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. Executive Producer: W. Richard West, Jr. (Southern Cheyenne).
An emotionally engaging film, A Thousand Roads is a fictional work that illustrates the complexity and vibrancy of contemporary Native life by following the lives of four Native people living in New York City, Alaska, New Mexico, and Peru. Free. No tickets required. For ages 12 and up.


  FILMS
Native Film: Welcome Home
10:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:30 and 4:30 p.m.
Daily

Rasmuson Theater

 
DAILY unless otherwise noted.
(2005, 13 min.)U.S. In September 2004, thousands of Native peoples from throughout the Western Hemisphere and non-Native supporters gathered to celebrate the grand opening of the National Museum of the American Indian. Welcome Home captures the spirit and energy of the historic Native Nations Procession and other celebratory events.


 
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Pawaats Family Activity Room
May 3, 2006–January 2, 2007, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Daily

Listening to Our Ancestors exhibition, Third Level

 

Visit the Paawats Family Activity Room, which is part of the Listening to Our Ancestors exhibition. Paawats means "bird's nest" or "place where learning takes place" in the language of the Nuu-chah-nulth people. In this part of the gallery, you can handle fishing tools, practice weaving, play a matching game, learn a story, and try lots of other fun act ivities!
Visit the Welcome Desk the day of your visit for more information.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
STORYTELLING with Jack Gladstone
Friday, June 30, 2006, 11:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 1, 2006, 11:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 2, 2006, 11:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m.


 

Jack Gladstone is a singer, songwriter, and storyteller from the Blackfeet Reservation in northern Montana. In 1985, he co-founded Glacier National Park's "Native America Speaks," now celebrating its 22nd season. This program is recognized nationally for excellence in the interpretation of Native cultures. Gladstone is masterful at blending legend, history, and metaphor into story.
Friday: Outdoor Amphitheater
Saturday: Rasmuson Theater
Sunday: Rasmuson Theater


 
 
PERFORMANCES
INDIAN SUMMER SHOWCASE Jack Gladstone and the Great Northern Band
Saturday, July 1, 2006, 6 p.m.

Outdoor Welcome Plaza

 

Join us for the Indian Summer Showcase—a new, free outdoor concert series outside the museum's main entrance on the Welcome Plaza. Presented twice a month from May through August, the series presents Native talent from throughout the Americas through music, song, humor, and more. This series is made possible in part by support from Starbucks Coffee Company.
Gladstone is a singer, songwriter, and storyteller from the Blackfeet Reservation in northern Montana. In 1985, he co-founded Glacier National Park's "Native America Speaks," now celebrating its 22nd season. This program is recognized nationally for excellence in the interpretation of Native cultures. Gladstone is masterful at blending legend, history, and metaphor into song. Through uplifting lyrics and epic ballads, he takes his listeners on a memorable journey to one of the last best places, Montana.
Light fare and beverages available from the Zagat-rated Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe. Enjoy Starbucks summer beverages during this concert! Rain location: Potomac Atrium.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE DANCE Wa:k Tab Basket Dancers
July 1, 2006–July 4, 2006, 12 noon
Mondays, Tuesdays, Saturdays, Sundays
Thursday, June 29, 2006, 12 noon

Potomac Atrium

 
The Wa:k Tab Basket Dancers are a young women's dance group from the San Xavier District of the Tohono O'odham Nation, located in southern Arizona. They perform dances which illustrate the fine art of Tohono O'odham baskets�made from beargrass, yucca, and devil's claw.
On June 30-July 4, the Wa:k Tab Basket Dancers will also be performing at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival (June 30-July 4 and July 7-July 11, 2006), Carriers of Culture: Living Native Basket Traditions. Carriers of Culture is hosted by the Smithsonian Institution's Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, Michigan State University Museum and the National Museum of the American Indian.
Support


 
 
FILMS
FILMS ON THURSDAY Teachings of the Tree People
Thursday, July 6, 2006, Noon & 3 p.m.
Thursday, July 20, 2006, Noon & 3 p.m.
Thursday, July 27, 2006, Noon & 3 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

Teachings of the Tree People
(2004, 20 min.). U.S. Director: Katie Jennings
A tribute to Bruce (Subiyay) Miller � basketmaker, teacher, historian, and spiritual leader from the Skokomish Indian Reservation, near Shelton, Washington. The film presents Miller's role in sustaining the Twana language and culture of the Skokomish people.


 
 
DEMONSTRATIONS
Lumbee Pine Needle Basketweaving with Herman and Loretta Oxendine
Friday, July 7, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Saturday, July 8, 2006, 11 a.m. � 12 noon
Sunday, July 9, 2006, 2 � 3 p.m.
Monday, July 10, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Tuesday, July 11, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.

Potomac Atrium

 

Husband and wife basket makers Herman and Loretta Oxendine are Lumbee tribal elders from Pembroke, North Carolina. Masters in the art of pine needle basket making, the Oxendines will demonstrate and share experiences about the basket making process.
NOTE: On Saturday & Sunday, July 8 & 9, Herman and Loretta Oxendine will be participating at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival (June 30-July 4 and July 7-July 11, 2006), Carriers of Culture: Living Native Basket Traditions.
Carriers of Culture is hosted by the Smithsonian Institution's Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, Michigan State University Museum and the National Museum of the American Indian.
Smithsonian Folklife Festival


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
NATIVE LANDSCAPE Ladybug Releases
Friday, June 16, 2006, 10 a.m.
Friday, July 7, 2006, 10 a.m.
Friday, July 28, 2006, 10 a.m.
Friday, August 18, 2006, 10 a.m.

Meet at the museum's south entrance (on Maryland Avenue near 4th Street and Independence Avenue, SW).

 

This agricultural technique is an eco-friendly and fun way to control pests in the museum's landscape. Presented by the staff of the NMAI and the Smithsonian's Horticulture Services Division.

Weather permitting.


 
 
WORKSHOPS
FAMILY DAY Celebrate Horses and Native Cultures
Saturday, July 8, 2006, 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Education Classroom 3010, Third Level

 

Look for horse regalia around the museum and discover more about the use and meaning of these objects. Then, create and decorate your own strike-a-light bag. Appropriate for all ages.


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
Celebrate Horses and Native Cultures Publication Lecture for NMAI's new book: A Song for the Horse Nation: Horses in Native American Cultures
Saturday, July 8, 2006, 1 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

Editors George P. Horse Capture (A'aninin) and Emil Her Many Horses (Lakota) will give a slide show based on their beautiful, new illustrated book, A Song for the Horse Nation. Essays, stories, and poems as well as more than 60 color photographs of such items as saddles, bridles, beaded blankets, horse masks, ledger drawings, painted shields, and horse dance sticks�all from the NMAI's collection�provide an intimate view of the central role of horses in Plains Indian cultures.
Book signing in the Potomac Atrium follows the program.


 
 
WORKSHOPS
Celebrate Horses and Native Cultures Native Writers for Kids and Plains Ledger Art Workshop
Saturday, July 8, 2006


 

Native Writers for Kids with S.D. Nelson
11 a.m., Rasmuson Theater

Children's author and illustrator S.D. Nelson (Lakota) in a discusses the importance of horses in Native American cultures and will talk about his ledger-style paintings. Nelson's recent titles include: Crazy Horse's Vision (Lee & Howe Books, 2000), by Joseph D. Bruchac, illustrated by S. D. Nelson and Gift Horse (Harry N. Abrams, 1999), written and illustrated by S. D. Nelson. Book signing will follow the program.
Plains Ledger Art Workshop with S.D. Nelson
2 pm., Room 4018/19, 4th level
(55 min.) Join S.D. Nelson (Lakota) in a hands-on workshop about ledger art and drawings. Tickets required for admission (inquire at Welcome Desk), limited to 30 participants and good for ages 8 and older.
About ledger drawings: In the late 1800s and early 1900s, many Plains tribes acquired ledgers or lined notebooks from Europeans. The tribes used the ledgers and colored pencils to record their history in detailed drawings. Horses were a frequent subject matter in many ledger drawings.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
INDIAN SUMMER SHOWCASE Yarina
Friday, July 14, 2006, 6 p.m.

Outdoor Welcome Plaza

 

Join us for the Indian Summer Showcase—a new, free outdoor concert series outside the museum's main entrance on the Welcome Plaza. Presented twice a month from May through August, the series presents Native talent from throughout the Americas through music, song, humor, and more. This series is made possible in part by support from Starbucks Coffee Company.
The Cachimuel family (Quechua) performs contemporary Andean and original compositions and incorporates elements of jazz, blues, Latin, and traditional music. The family draws on the renown musical traditions of their hometown, Otovalo, Ecuador,
Light fare and beverages available from the Zagat-rated Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe. Enjoy Starbucks summer beverages during this concert!

Rain location: Potomac Atrium.


 
 
WORKSHOPS
Return to a Native Place Family Day
Saturday, July 22, 2006, 10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Education Classroom 3010, Third Level

 

Celebrate the opening of Return to a Native Place, a panel exhibition honoring the tribes and communities of the Chesapeake. Learn about traditional and contemporary fishing and farming practices and meet tribal members from the region. Try your hand at some simple games or make a toy to take home.
This program was rescheduled from June 24.


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
Invention on the Mall: Meet Composer Raven Chacon
Saturday, August 5, 2006, 1 & 3 p.m.

Conference Center (Rooms 4018-4019), Fourth Level

 

Raven Chacon (Navajo), a composer and performer, talks about inventive aspects various electronic instruments and devices he has adapted for his compositions, including a Theremin/guitar, 4-track recorder delay device, and even a Sony Walkman, and demonstrates them in mini-performances. Presented in conjunction with "Invention on the Mall," sponsored by the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for Invention and Innovation, National Museum of American History.
"Invention on the Mall" is a Smithsonian-wide celebration, led by the Lemelson Center, examining the breadth and diversity of invention and innovation from a variety of artistic, scientific, pre-Columbian, and pre-historic perspectives. "Invention on the Mall" will explore the universal nature of invention through programs at the National Museum of American History and other participating Smithsonian museums featuring their unique collections and scholarship.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
INDIAN SUMMER SHOWCASE COMEDY BY ARIGON STARR: THE RED ROAD
Saturday, August 5, 2006, 6 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

Join us for the Indian Summer Showcase—a new, free outdoor concert series outside the museum's main entrance on the Welcome Plaza. Presented twice a month from May through August, the series presents Native talent from throughout the Americas through music, song, humor, and more. This series is made possible in part by support from Starbucks Coffee Company.
Spend the evening laughing with comedian and musician, Arigon Starr (Kickapoo/Creek) in Native Voices at the Autry's The Red Road. This one-woman comedy with music, written and performed by Arigon Starr and directed by Randy Reinholz, takes you through a busy day at Verna Yahola's All Nations Café, off legendary Route 66 is Sapulpa, Oklahoma.
This family-friendly comedy features a cast of characters straight out of Indian country—ages nine to fifty-seven. Join Grand Ole Opry singer Patty Jones as she leads us through a particularly busy day at the All Nations Café. There's a heap of trouble and a huge storm brewin' as Verna tangles with über-Indian Clem Doolittle, meets British bad boy Danny Dacron, and contemplates a proposal from her good-hearted Navajo fry cook Emmitt Tsinajinnie.
Light fare and beverages available from the Zagat-rated Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe.


 
 
FILMS
FILMS ON THURSDAY Listening to Our Ancestors: the Art of Native Life Along the North Pacific Coast and Raven Tales: How Raven Stole the Sun
Thursday, August 10, 2006, Noon & 3 pm
Thursday, August 24, 2006, Noon & 3 pm
Thursday, August 31, 2006, Noon & 3 pm

Rasmuson Theater, First Level

 
Listening to Our Ancestors: the Art of Native Life Along the North Pacific Coast (2006, 6 min.) U.S. Produced by the National Museum of the American Indian
Raven Tales: How Raven Stole the Sun (2004, 23 min.) U.S./Canada. Directors: Chris Kientz (Cherokee) and Simon James (Kwakwaka'wakw)
The program begins with a video in which people from 11 Native nations of the North Pacific Coast discuss the meaning the Listening to Our Ancestors art exhibit has for them. Then from an animated series of this same region, How Raven Stole the Sun, portrays a modern adaptation of a classic Haida tale, in which the misadventures of Raven, Eagle, and Frog inadvertently bring daylight into the world.


 
 
DEMONSTRATIONS
Nisga'a Carving with Norman Tait
Friday, August 11, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Saturday, August 12, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Sunday, August 13, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.

Potomac Atrium

 



 
 
WORKSHOPS
FAMILY DAY North Pacific Coast Weaving Traditions
Saturday, August 12, 2006, 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Education Classroom 3010, Third Level

 

Basket weaving is an important tradition for all North Pacific Coast communities. Natural materials�cedar, grasses, and reeds, for example�are collected and woven into baskets for shellfish gathering, or sturdy mats for sitting. Learn more about women from the North Pacific Coast, their weaving skills, and techniques, as you create your own mat or basket to take home.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
Storytelling with Mary Louise Defender Wilson and Keith Bear
Thursday, August 17, 2006, Noon & 2 p.m.
Friday, August 18, 2006


 

Keith Bear (Hidatsa and Mandan), is from the Three Affiliated Tribes in Fort Berthold, North Dakota. As a storyteller, he feels that stories are not merely legends or fables, but living stories. Keith also plays the flute by ear and uses the flute to tell stories.
Mary Louise Defender Wilson, also known as Gourd Woman, is a Dakotah elder from the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation of North Dakota; she is also Hidatsa. She travels extensively telling her stories at schools and concert halls in English, mixed with Dakotah words for a taste of where the stories come from.
Presented in conjunction with "Homegrown," co-sponsored by the Library of Congress American Folklife Center and Performing Arts for Everyone at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Arts.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
INDIAN SUMMER SHOWCASE George Leach and the James and Ernie Comedy Duo
Saturday, August 19, 2006, 6 p.m.

Outdoor Welcome Plaza*

 

Join us for the Indian Summer Showcase�a new, free outdoor concert series outside the museum's main entrance on the Welcome Plaza. Presented twice a month from May through August, the series presents Native talent from throughout the Americas through music, song, humor, and more. This series is made possible in part by support from Starbucks Coffee Company.
George Leach
George Leach's rich musical style was nurtured in his upbringing as a child of the Sta'atl'imx Nation. Nestled in the majestic mountain terrain of Lillooet, British Columbia, Canada, his soulful rock-driven music derives from a cherished tradition of Aboriginal and mainstream music.
Light fare and beverages available from the Zagat-rated Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe. Enjoy Starbucks summer beverages during this concert!

Rain location: Potomac Atrium.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
INDIAN SUMMER SHOWCASE: James and Ernie Comedy Duo
Saturday, August 19, 2006, 6 p.m.

Outdoor Welcome Plaza

 

James Junes and Ernest Tsosie III make up the Navajo comedy team who delivers sidesplitting comedy with a positive message promoting healthy lifestyle choices. James and Ernie open the evening of entertainment for the George Leach Band.
Rain location: Potomac Atrium.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE MUSIC: Ledward Ka'apana
Saturday, September 9, 2006, 2 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

Ledward Kaapana has been one of Hawai`i's most influential musicians for nearly four decades. His mastery of stringed instruments, particularly ki ho'alu (slack key guitar), and extraordinary baritone and leo ki`eki`e (falsetto) voice have made him a musical legend. Ledward is also accomplished on 'ukulele, autoharp, bass, and steel guitar, and he blends his virtuosity with an infectious joy for performing, a generous spirit, and a kolohe (rascally) sense of humor.
This performance is supported by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and the Wolftrap Foundation for the Performing Arts.


 
    
Events in New York Events in Washington, DC Films Performances Special Programs Tours, Talks & Lectures Workshops