4 captures
21 Aug 2006 - 26 Jan 2021
JULAUGMAY
22
200520062021
About this capture





Nobel author under fire for Nazi past

Monday 14 August 2006, 18:34 Makka Time, 15:34 GMT  
Grass says his secret past had been weighing on his mind
 Tools:
 Email Article
 Print Article
 Send Your Feedback
Guenter Grass, the German Nobel-prizewinning author, is being urged to give up his honorary citizenship of Gdansk after he revealed that he was once a member of the SS.
Grass, 78, told the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung newspaper that he joined the Waffen-SS when he was 17. He was bing interviewed on Saturday to discuss his autobiography, Peeling Onions.
The Waffen was the combat unit of Hitler's paramilitary SS organisation.
Grass had previously said he was drafted in 1944 to help anti-aircraft gun teams. He was held as a prisoner of war until 1946. After the war, he became an outspoken pacifist and icon of the German left.
He said the secret had been weighing on his mind and was one of the reasons he wrote the autobiography, which details his war experience.

Political outrage
The revelation has caused outrage in Poland, especially in the coastal city of Gdansk, the Baltic city where Grass was born and which has featured in several of his works.
The former Polish president, Lech Walesa, like Grass, hails from the city known as Danzig in German and also holds honorary citizenship.
On Monday he urged the author to give up the honorary title himself rather than wait for Gdansk officials to strip him of it.
"Who will talk to him here now or invite him?" he said. "I am happy we never met, that I never had to shake his hand. I lost my father in the war and Grass was in the SS."
Jacek Kurski, a member of parliament from Gdansk for the ruling Law and Justice party told a news conference that "it is unacceptable for a city where the first blood was shed, where World War Two began, to have a Waffen-SS member as an honorary citizen".

Expelled

Kurski said his party would propose a resolution to the Gdansk city council to strip Grass of his honorary citizenship if the author failed to surrender it on his own.
"It would be good if Grass gave up the title voluntarily," he said.
Poles and Germans lived together in Gdansk before the war, but most of the German population fled as the war ended or were later expelled.
Grass is best known for his 1957 novel The Tin Drum and in 1999 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Reuters

 Tools:
 Email Article
 Print Article
 Send Your Feedback

Latest stories in this section: 
Top News
• Israeli troops open fire in Lebanon
• Israeli reservists protest
• Haitian gangs fail to disarm
• 10 dead in Nigeria botched hostage release
• Iran stands by nuclear programme
Top Culture Stories
• Algerian patois delights and disturbs
• Nobel laureate Mahfouz seriously ill
• Priceless Peruvian treasure found
• Asian psychologists talk terrorism
• Using sex to halt the spread of Aids
 Features

Amazon Stonehenge
Will ancient observatory's discovery rewrite history?
Gibby Zobel

Heavy issues
Japan weighs growing obesity problem
Julian Ryall

Unwrapping history
Caucasian mummies pre-date East Asians in China
Benjamin Robertson

Seeking reconciliation
Palestinian, Israeli artists come together in exhibition
Rachel Shabi

Deployment distress
Suicides by returning men trouble Japanese military
Chris Cushing

Faith and fashion
A modern look at a traditional Gulf garment 
Indlieb Farazi



 
Home | Arab World News | Global News | Economy | Culture | Special Reports | Science and Technology | Weather 
About Aljazeera | News Alerts | Polling | Advertising |  Feedback | Contact Us | Site Guide

© 2003 - 2006 Aljazeera.Net  Copyright and Terms of Use, Privacy Policy, Disclaimer
Advanced SearchHomepageCultureSci-TechSpecial ReportsWeatherPollsContact UsAbout AljazeeraCode of EthicsFrequenciesArab WorldGlobalNewsMarket WatchAdvertisingAljazeera MobileNews AlertsTravel Booking
Home Site Guide Contact Us