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07 Sep 2003 - 11 Feb 2021
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SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Paawats Family Activity Room
May 3, 2006–January 2, 2007, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Daily

Listening to Our Ancestors exhibition, Third Level

 

Visit the Paawats Family Activity Room, which is part of the Listening to Our Ancestors exhibition. Paawats means "bird's nest" or "place where learning takes place" in the language of the Nuu-chah-nulth people. In this part of the gallery, you can handle fishing tools, practice weaving, play a matching game, learn a story, and try lots of other fun act ivities!
Visit the Welcome Desk the day of your visit for more information.


 
 
FILMS
NMAI Signature Film: A Thousand Roads
August 26, 2006–September 4, 2006, 11:30 a.m., 1:30 and 3:30 p.m.
Daily

Rasmuson Theater

 

(2005, 43 min.) U.S. Director: Chris Eyre (Cheyenne/Arapaho). Writers: Scott Garen and Joy Harjo (Mvskoke/Creek). Produced by Barry Clark and Scott Garen for the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. Executive Producer: W. Richard West, Jr. (Southern Cheyenne).
An emotionally engaging film, A Thousand Roads is a fictional work that illustrates the complexity and vibrancy of contemporary Native life by following the lives of four Native people living in New York City, Alaska, New Mexico, and Peru. Free. No tickets required. For ages 12 and up.
Film schedule subject to change.


 
 
FILMS
Native Film: Welcome Home
August 26, 2006–September 4, 2006, 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:30 and 4:30 p.m.
Daily

Rasmuson Theater

 

(2005, 13 min.)U.S. In September 2004, thousands of Native peoples from throughout the Western Hemisphere and non-Native supporters gathered to celebrate the grand opening of the National Museum of the American Indian. Welcome Home captures the spirit and energy of the historic Native Nations Procession and other celebratory events.
Film schedule subject to change.


 
 
FILMS
Daily Screenings - Made in Clay
September 1, 2006–September 30, 2006, 10:30 a.m.
Daily

Elmer and Mary Louis Rasmuson Theater, First level

 

Showtimes and titles screened are subject to change. For more information, please stop by the Information Desk the day of your visit.
How the Rabbit Lost His Tail (2003, 8 min.) US. Producer: Joseph Erb (Cherokee). Director: Brandee Beaver, Marcus Duvall, Natalie Roberts, Darren Rock, and Kryston Salsman. Produced by: the American Indian Resource Center (AIRC), Tahlequah. In Muscogee Creek with English subtitles. Muscogee Creek students at the Morris High School make a claymation of a traditional story telling how Rabbit lost his tail.
How the Redbird Got His Color (2003, 4 min. Animation) US. Producer: Joseph Erb (Cherokee). Produced by: The American Indian Resource Center, Tallequah, OK. In Cherokee with English subtitles. A claymation by Cherokee students tells a traditional story of a kind deed rewarded.
Mapohiceto/Not Listening (2003, 5 min.) US. Producer: Joseph Erb (Cherokee). Produced by: American Indian Resource Center, Tahlequah
In Muscogee Creek with English subtitles. A memorable Muscogee Creek story about a boy who doesn't listen is told through clay animation made by students of Ryal School.


 
 
FILMS
Native Film: Welcome Home
September 5, 2006–September 11, 2006, 12:30 and 2:30 p.m.
Daily

Rasmuson Theater

 

(2005, 13 min.) U.S. In September 2004, thousands of Native peoples from throughout the Western Hemisphere and non-Native supporters gathered to celebrate the grand opening of the National Museum of the American Indian. Welcome Home captures the spirit and energy of the historic Native Nations Procession and other celebratory events.
Film schedule subject to change.


 
 
FILMS
NMAI Signature Film A Thousand Roads
September 5, 2006–September 11, 2006, 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Daily

Rasmuson Theater

 

(2005, 43 min.) U.S. Director: Chris Eyre (Cheyenne/Arapaho). Writers: Scott Garen and Joy Harjo (Mvskoke/Creek). Produced by Barry Clark and Scott Garen for the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. Executive Producer: W. Richard West, Jr. (Southern Cheyenne).
An emotionally engaging film, A Thousand Roads is a fictional work that illustrates the complexity and vibrancy of contemporary Native life by following the lives of four Native people living in New York City, Alaska, New Mexico, and Peru. Free. No tickets required. For ages 12 and up.
Film schedule subject to change.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE MUSIC: Ledward Kaapana
Saturday, September 9, 2006, 2 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

Ledward Kaapana has been one of Hawai`i's most influential musicians for nearly four decades. His mastery of stringed instruments, particularly ki ho'alu (slack key guitar), and extraordinary baritone and leo ki`eki`e (falsetto) voice have made him a musical legend. Ledward is also accomplished on 'ukulele, autoharp, bass, and steel guitar, and he blends his virtuosity with an infectious joy for performing, a generous spirit, and a kolohe (rascally) sense of humor.
This performance is supported by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts.


 
 
FILMS
LELAWI THEATER AT NMAI IN WASHINGTON, D.C., CLOSED FOR MAINTENANCE
Tuesday, September 12, 2006
Wednesday, September 13, 2006
Thursday, September 14, 2006


 

We apologize for any inconvenience.


 
 
FILMS
Native Film Welcome Home
September 15, 2006–November 22, 2006, 12:30 and 2:30 p.m.
Daily

Rasmuson Theater

 

(2005, 13 min.) U.S. In September 2004, thousands of Native peoples from throughout the Western Hemisphere and non-Native supporters gathered to celebrate the grand opening of the National Museum of the American Indian. Welcome Home captures the spirit and energy of the historic Native Nations Procession and other celebratory events.
Film schedule subject to change.


 
 
FILMS
Signature Film A Thousand Roads
September 15, 2006–November 22, 2006, 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Daily

Rasmuson Theater

 

(2005, 43 min.) U.S. Director: Chris Eyre (Cheyenne/Arapaho). Writers: Scott Garen and Joy Harjo (Mvskoke/Creek). Produced by Barry Clark and Scott Garen for the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. Executive Producer: W. Richard West, Jr. (Southern Cheyenne).
An emotionally engaging film, A Thousand Roads is a fictional work that illustrates the complexity and vibrancy of contemporary Native life by following the lives of four Native people living in New York City, Alaska, New Mexico, and Peru. Free. No tickets required. For ages 12 and up.
Film schedule subject to change.


 
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Performance and Discussion The Emberá People of Panama
Saturday, September 23, 2006, 1 and 3:30 p.m.

Outdoor Theater (rain location: Potomac Atrium)

 

A group of Emberá people, from the Panama's Darien rain forest, perform their traditional songs, dance, and music; they will also talk about their culture and about their boat, the Pajaro Jai (Enchanted Bird), which they built over a 12-year period from native hardwoods. The boat, manned by a crew of Emberá and others, is visiting various ports along the East Coast and will later sail to Europe. Presented in cooperation with the Pajaro Jai Foundation.


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
NATIVE WRITERS SERIES: Ron Hamilton
Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 6:30 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

Ron Hamilton (Nuu-chah-nulth) author and artist, shares stories of his culture as part of NMAI's celebration of the yearlong exhibit, "Listening to our Ancestors: The Art of Native Life Along the North Pacific Coast." Reception and book signing in the Potomac Atrium will follow the program.


 
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
NATIVE STORYTELLING: Ron Hamilton
Friday, September 29, 2006, 10:30 a.m. and noon
Saturday, September 30, 2006, 12 p.m. and 3 p.m.
Sunday, October 1, 2006, 12 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Outdoor Amphitheater

 

Ron Hamilton (Nuu-chah-nulth) author and artist, shares stories of his culture as part of NMAI's celebration of the yearlong exhibit, "Listening to our Ancestors: The Art of Native Life Along the North Pacific Coast."


 
 
FILMS
At the Movies
Friday, September 29, 2006, 7:00 pm
Saturday, September 30, 2006, 1:30 pm

Elmer and Mary Louis Rasmuson Theater, First Level

 

Indian Country Diaries: Spiral of Fire
(2005, 84 min.)
Director: Carol Cornsilk (Cherokee)
Producer: Carol Cornsilk (Cherokee)
Produced by: Native American Public Telecommunications (NAPT) and AdanvdoVision
Writer LeAnne Howe (Choctaw) travels to Cherokee, North Carolina to the home of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in search of the father she never knew. Instead, the community she discovers leads her to ask crucial questions about identity, cultural preservation, health, capitalism, religion, assimilation.
Discussion following the evening screening with Spiral of Fire screenwriter and narrator, the award-winning author, playwright and scholar LeAnne Howe (Choctaw).


 
 
FILMS
Daily Screenings - Celebrate Latin America
October 1, 2006–October 31, 2006, 10:30 am
Daily

Elmer and Mary Louis Rasmuson Theater, First Level

 

Showtimes and titles screened are subject to change. For more information, please stop by the Information Desk the day of your visit.
Turix/Dragonfly (2003, 33 min.) MEXICO. Director: Byrt Wammack. Producer: Ana Rosa Duarte (Maya). Produced by: Yoochel Kaaj. In the state of Yucatán, an eclectic, multilingual television magazine is being produced by workshops of Maya, Zapotec, Mixtec, Tzeltal, and Chol videomakers, in collaboration with other contributors.


 
 
FILMS
Daily Screenings - Celebrate Latin America
October 1, 2006–October 31, 2006, 3:30 pm
Daily

Elmer and Mary Louis Rasmuson Theater, First Level

 

Showtimes and titles screened are subject to change. For more information, please stop by the Information Desk the day of your visit.
La Ofrenda: The Days of the Dead (1988, 50 min.) US. Director: Lourdes Portillo and Susana Muñoz. A visually rich documentary shot in Mexico and California explores the joyous and sad meanings of the Day of the Dead and its place in Mexican and Chicano heritage.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE MUSIC: Classical Native Recital with David Yeagley, Tim Archambault, and James Pellerite
Thursday, October 5, 2006, Noon

All performances in the Rasmuson Theater

 

Thursday, October 5, through Sunday, October 8
The Classical Native will unite American Indian classical composers and musicians through a four-day musical cornucopia of recitals, chamber music concerts, school programs, as well as a roundtable with the composers. These programs will demonstrate the strikingly diverse talents of the Native music community and further the NMAI's mission to dispel commonly held perceptions about the lives and cultures of America's Native peoples.
David Yeagley (Comanche), piano, performs his own compositions, with flutists Tim Archambault (Kichesipirini) and James Pellerite.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE MUSIC: Classical Native Open Rehearsals
Thursday, October 5, 2006, 2 � 4 p.m.
Friday, October 6, 2006, 2 � 4 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

Inquire at the theater or Welcome Desk for information.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE MUSIC: Classical Native Special School Programs
Thursday, October 5, 2006, 10:30 a.m.
Friday, October 6, 2006, 10:30 a.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

The program will include Contemporary Music Forum performing Jerod Tate's "Spirit Chief Names the Animal People," with R. Carlos Nakai as narrator, and other works for young audiences performed by participating artists. Appropriate for Grades 3 and up.
For further information and reservations, call 888-618-0572.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE MUSIC: Classical Native
Saturday, October 7, 2006

All performances in the Rasmuson Theater

 

Thursday, October 5, through Sunday, October 8
The Classic Native will unite American Indian classical composers and musicians through a four-day musical cornucopia of recitals, chamber music concerts, school programs, as well as a roundtable with the composers. These programs will demonstrate the strikingly diverse talents of the Native music community and further the NMAI's mission to dispel commonly held perceptions about the lives and cultures of America's Native peoples.
Noon Recital: Heidi Senungetuk (Inupiat), violin recital;
1 p.m. Composers' Roundtable (Special Location: Rooms 4018-4019);
2 p.m. Chamber Concert: University of Mary Washington Chamber Ensemble, works by Louis Ballard (Quapaw) and Raven Chacon (Navajo);
4 p.m. Recital: Barbara McAlister (Cherokee), mezzo-soprano, vocal recital with Timothy Long (Choctaw), piano, and the New York 5;
7:30 p.m. Concert: R. Carlos Nakai concert (tickets required; contact The Smithsonian Associates, 202-357-3030, www.residentassociates.org​).


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE MUSIC: Classical Native
Sunday, October 8, 2006

All performances in the Rasmuson Theater

 

Thursday, October 5, through Sunday, October 8
The Classic Native will unite American Indian classical composers and musicians through a four-day musical cornucopia of recitals, chamber music concerts, school programs, as well as a roundtable with the composers. These programs will demonstrate the strikingly diverse talents of the Native music community and further the NMAI's mission to dispel commonly held perceptions about the lives and cultures of America's Native peoples.
Noon Recital: Gabriel Ayala (Yaqui), classical guitar;
2 p.m., Performers' Potpourri, with Steven Alvarez (Mescalero Apache/Yaqui/Upper Tanana Athabascan), Heidi Senungetuk, Tara-Louise Montour, Dawn Avery, and others;
4 p.m. Chamber Concert: Contemporary Music Forum, Steve Antosca, music director, performing works by David Yeagley, Barbara Croall (Odawa), Jerod Impichchaachaaha' Tate (Chickasaw), and Raven Chacon (Navajo).


 
 
PERFORMANCES
"Connections" with Steven Alvarez
Monday, October 9, 2006, 2 p.m.
Tuesday, October 10, 2006, 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Wednesday, October 11, 2006, 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

Singer, musician, and storyteller Steven Alvarez (Mescalero Apache/Yaqui/Upper Tanana Athabascan) honors the past and celebrates the future through a multimedia storytelling presentation with song and story. At a certain point in life, many come to realize the priceless value of Elders who teach the way of being human. Alvarez shares his vision of "Connections" with our past through story and song, giving hope to younger generations to celebrate their future, while cherishing their past.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE PERFORMANCE: The Captivation of Eunice Williams
Friday, October 13, 2006
Saturday, October 14, 2006

Rasmuson Theater

 

7 p.m. Panel discussion
8 p.m. Opera performance
This new opera is based on a 1704 incident in which Eunice Williams, a young girl from Deerfield, Massachusetts, was captured and raised by Mohawks from the Kahnawake community, along the banks of the St. Lawrence River. Eunice's family tried to ransom her back, urging her to return to the Puritan culture in which she spent her early years, but she chose to remain with her Mohawk family.
Composer Paula Kimper, librettist Harley Erdman, and producer/director Linda McInerney, are non-Natives, but they consulted with tribal leaders from Kahnawake in creating this work. The opera has received overwhelmingly positive responses from audiences in Deerfield, Cooperstown, New York, and at Kahnawake itself.
A pre-performance discussion will look at how this story might be told from a Native perspective. Panelists will include Native historians and performers and the opera's creators. These performances are sponsored in part by the International Music and Art Foundation.
Tickets required. Members - $20; Senior Members - $18; General Admission - $25, and Students - $15. For tickets please call 202-357-3030 or visit ResidentAssociates.org​.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE THEATER El Gueguence
Saturday, October 21, 2006, 1 and 4 p.m.
Sunday, October 22, 2006, 1 and 4 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

El Gueguense, performed by Ballet Folklorico Nicaraguense and Camerata Bach, is one of the oldest indigenous theatrical/dance works of the Western Hemisphere, written in the 16th century in the Nauhuatl and Spanish languages. It symbolizes resistance to the Spanish culture imposed on the indigenous. In 2005 UNESCO declared El Gueguence a patrimony of humanity. This is an extraordinary acknowledgement of Nicaragua's indigenous people. The government of Nicaragua is promoting El Gueguence to preserve its indigenous heritage. Additional tour sponsorship provided by Gran Pacifica and Seminole Plaza Hotel, Managua.
Co-sponsored by the Embassy of Nicaragua and Nicaraguan Institute of Tourism.


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
NATIVE WRITERS HONOR ALVIN M. JOSEPHY JR. (1915-2005)
Wednesday, October 25, 2006, 6:30 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

A discussion with Gerard A. Baker (Mandan/Hidatsa), Roberta Basch (Puyallup), Richard Basch (Clatsop/Nehalem Confederated Tribes), and Allan Pinkham (Nez Perce), contributing writers to Lewis and Clark Through Indian Eyes (Knopf, 2006), which was edited by Alvin M. Josephy Jr.
Moderated by Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee).


 
 
FILMS
At the Movies
Friday, October 27, 2006, 7:00 pm
Saturday, October 28, 2006, 1:30 pm

Elmer and Mary Louis Rasmuson Theater, First Level

 

Chac
(1974, 95 min.) MEXICO/US
Director: Rolando Klein
Actors: Pablo Canché Balam, Alonzo Méndez Ton, Sebastián Santis,
Pedro Tiez and Antonio Castellanos
In Tzeltal with English subtitles.
Incorporating elements of Maya ceremony and story, Chac portrays a small village in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, during a terrible drought. After the local shaman fails to bring promised rain, men from the community go in search of a mysterious healer whose prayers they hope will be answered by Chac, the god of rain. Shot on location, the powerful acting by members of a local indigenous community make Chac as vivid as documentary and as gripping as myth.


 
 
FILMS
Daily Screenings - The North Pacific Coast
November 1, 2006–November 30, 2006, 10:30 am
Daily

Rasmuson Theater, First Level

 

Bentwood Box (1985, 9 min.) U.S. Director: Sandra Osawa (Makah). The film explores the making of a traditional Northwest Coast-style box of steamed cedarwood, constructed by hand without using nails, screws, or glue.
Box of Daylight (1990, 9 min.) U.S. Director: Janet Fries. Produced for: The Sealaska Heritage Foundation. The Naa Kahidi Theater of southeastern Alaska presents the Tlingit story of how Raven brought daylight to the world.
Presented as part of NMAI's Listening to our Ancestors Cultural Festival,​November 3 - 25.
All screenings are subject to change. For more information, please stop by the Welcome Desk the day of your visit.


 
 
FILMS
Daily Screenings - The North Pacific Coast
November 1, 2006–November 30, 2006, 3:30 pm
Daily

Rasmuson Theater, First Level

 

Usual and Accustomed Places (2000, 48 min. Documentary) US. Producer/Director: Sandra Sunrising Osawa (Makah). Produced by: Upstream Productions. This account of the Pacific Northwest tribes' century-long struggle to uphold their fishing rights focuses on the history of the Makah Nation of Washington State.
Presented as part of NMAI's Listening to our Ancestors Cultural Festival,​November 3 - 25.
All screenings are subject to change. For more information, please stop by the Welcome Desk the day of your visit.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE DANCE: Angoon Dance Group
Friday, November 3, 2006, 10:30 a.m. and Noon
Saturday, November 4, 2006, 10:30 a.m. and Noon
Sunday, November 5, 2006, 10:30 a.m. and Noon

Rasmuson Theater

 

Angoon Dance Group, from Angoon, Alaska (population 600) presents heritage songs and dances from the Tlingit culture and will present an engaging performance that reflects time-honored Tlingit beliefs and will the appropriate cultural protocol of wearing traditional regalia while dancing to the beat of drumming and song.
Presented as part of NMAI's Listening to our Ancestors Cultural Festival,​November 3 - 25.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE THEATER Gunakadeit: An Alaskan Sea Monster Story
November 7, 2006–November 12, 2006, 10:30 a.m. and 11:45 a.m.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays

Rasmuson Theater

 

Gunakadeit, by Ishmael Hope (Inupiaq/Tlingit), is a one-act musical theater piece for children and families about a man, a mother-in-law, and a Sea Monster! This epic Tlingit story incorporates movement, music, and the changing voices of many characters. Playwright Ishmael Hope and three Alaska Native actors will perform this play, which is directed by Jim Simard and features music by composer Stefan Hakenberg. Co-hosted by the Smithsonian Institution's Discovery Theater.
Presented as part of NMAI's Listening to our Ancestors Cultural Festival,​November 3 - 25.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
STORYTELLING with Hope and Company
November 7, 2006–November 12, 2006, 2 & 3:30 p.m.
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays

Rasmuson Theater

 

Ishmael Hope (Inupiaq/Tlingit), Director of Outreach for Perseverance Theater of Juneau, Alaska, will present six days of storytelling performances with three fellow storytellers, all Alaska Natives. Mr. Hope is joined by storytellers Lily Hudson (Tlingit), Victoria Johnson (Tlingit), and Allan Hayton (Gwich'in Athabascan).
Presented as part of NMAI's Listening to our Ancestors Cultural Festival,​November 3 - 25.


 
 
DEMONSTRATIONS
NATIVE ART DEMONSTRATION Clarissa Hudson
Tuesday, November 7, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Wednesday, November 8, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Thursday, November 9, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.

Potomac Atrium

 

Clarissa Hudson (Tlingit, Sea Tern Clan) is an award-winning artist who works in a wide range of media, including weaving, painting, printmaking, and sculpture. A regalia designer and maker for 30 years, Hudson will demonstrate her skill in Chilkat weaving.

Presented as part of NMAI's Cultural Arts Festival celebrating the exhibit, Listening to our Ancestors: The Art of Native Life Along the North Pacific Coast.


 
 
DEMONSTRATIONS
Visual Poetry on Film and Paper: Donna Foulke
Thursday, November 9, 2006, Noon

Meeting Room 4018/19, Fourth level

 

Donna Foulke (Tlingit/Tsimshian) is a poet and artist, originally from Juneau, Alaska, now living in Northern Virginia. In addition to writing, she is a photographer, collage artist, filmmaker, and illustrator. Donna will perform and share examples of her experimental visual poetry on film and paper.
Presented as part of NMAI's Listening to our Ancestors Cultural Festival,​November 3 - 25.


 
 
DEMONSTRATIONS
NATIVE ART DEMONSTRATION with David Boxley
November 10, 2006–November 12, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays

Potomac Atrium

 

David Boxley (Tsimshian) is a master artist and performer whose carvings are in museums and collections worldwide. David will demonstrate the art of wood carving and Tsimshian designs and share his culture with visitors. Boxley emphasizes Tsimshian functional and decorative pieces, such as bentwood boxes, rattles, masks, prints, totem poles, and paddles. He and his family are dedicated to teaching about the rich culture of the Tsimshian people of Alaska and Canada.
Presented as part of NMAI's Listening to our Ancestors Cultural Festival,​November 3 - 25.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE STORYTELLING with Lorene Boxley
Friday, November 10, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Saturday, November 11, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Sunday, November 12, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.

Pawaats Family Activity Room
Listening to Our Ancestors exhibition, Third Level

 
Lorene Boxley (Tlingit) is a storyteller, dancer, weaver, bead-worker, and native language instructor. While her husband David Boxley (Tsimshian) demonstrates his art in the Potomac Atrium, Mrs. Boxley will shares stories of her Tlingit culture for children and families.

Presented as part of NMAI's Listening to our Ancestors Cultural Festival,​November 3 - 25.


 
 
WORKSHOPS
FAMILY DAY North Pacific Coast Weaving Traditions
Saturday, November 11, 2006, 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Education Workshop 3010, Third Level

 

Basket weaving is an important tradition for all North Pacific Coast communities. Natural materials—cedar, grasses, and reeds, and for example—are collected and woven into baskets for shellfish gathering, or sturdy mats for sitting. Meet Lorene Boxley, Tlingit weaver, dancer and storyteller. Learn more about Tlingit women, their weaving skills, and techniques as you create your own mat or basket to take home.
Presented as part of NMAI's Listening to our Ancestors Cultural Festival,​November 3 - 25.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
A Wampanoag Thanksgiving
Tuesday, November 14, 2006, 10:30 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Wednesday, November 15, 2006, 10:30 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Thursday, November 16, 2006, 10:30 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

This performance, presented by culture bearer Tobias Vanderhoop (Aquinnah Wampanoag), introduces you to the Wampanoag origins of giving thanks. Through story, song, drumming, dance, and drama, you will learn how Wampanoags traditionally offered thanks before contact with non-Natives, the Wampanoag experience of what is now commonly referred to as "The First Thanksgiving." You will also hear stories of how Wampanoags celebrate their own Cranberry Day today, as well as the American feast of Thanksgiving Day.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE DANCE 'Ksan Performing Arts Group
Friday, November 17, 2006, 10:30 a.m. and Noon, Rasmuson Theater
Saturday, November 18, 2006, Noon and 3:30 p.m., Potomac Atrium
Sunday, November 19, 2006, Noon and 3:30 p.m., Potomac Atrium


 

Join inter-generational members of the 'Ksan Performing Arts Group of the Gitxsan Nation from north central British Columbia in a dance performance including a traditional welcome and gift giving song.

Presented as part of NMAI's Listening to our Ancestors Cultural Festival,​November 3 - 25.


 
 
DEMONSTRATIONS
NATIVE ART DEMONSTRATION with Alvin Mack
Friday, November 17, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Saturday, November 18, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.
Sunday, November 19, 2006, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m.

Potomac Atrium

 

Alvin Mack (Nuxalk), will demonstrate Nuxalk Carving from the North Pacific Coast.
Presented as part of NMAI's Listening to our Ancestors Cultural Festival,​November 3 - 25.


 
 
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE MUSIC: Classical Native University of Mary Washington Wind and Percussion Ensemble, Craig Thomas Naylor, director
Saturday, November 18, 2006, 2 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

Continuing the museum's efforts to bring the work Native composers to wider audiences, this program will feature "Scenes from Indian Life" by Louis Ballard (Quapaw/Cherokee), "Grandmother Song" by Brent Michael Davids (Stockbridge Munsee), and premieres of works by Barbara Croall (Odawa) and Raven Chacon (Navajo) commissioned by the University of Mary Washington.
This concert is presented with support from The American Composers Forum (First Nations Composers Initiative), The National Band Association, The Kennedy Center Millennium Stage, The First Nations Development Institute, The UMW Multicultural Center, The UMW Department of Music, The UMW Office of the Dean of the Faculty, The Virginia Commission for the Arts, and the Embassy of Canada.


 
 
FILMS
At the Movies
Friday, November 24, 2006, 7:00 pm
Saturday, November 25, 2006, 1:30 pm

Elmer and Mary Louis Rasmuson Theater, First Level

 

Stolen Spirits of Haida Gwaii
(2004, 74 min) CANADA
Director: Kevin McMahon
Decades after numerous villages off Canada's Pacific Coastline were scavenged for artifacts, a quest is begun by the people of Haida Gwaii to reclaim the remains of 160 ancestors held in the collections of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, Illinois.
NMAI Repatriation specialist John Beaver will lead a discussion following the evening screening.


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
NATIVE WRITERS: Waziyatawin Angela Wilson
Wednesday, November 29, 2006, 6:30 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater

 

Waziyatawin Angela Wilson (Wahpetunwan Dakota), Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Indigenous history at Arizona State University. Waziyatawin's most recent publication, In the Footsteps of Our Ancestors: The Dakota Commemorative Marches of the 21st Century (Living Justice Press, 2006), is an edited collection that tells the stories of the Dakota Death March of 1862 and the commemorative walks that have been held in recent years to honor the memory of those Dakota people who endured the 1862 forced removal.
Reception and book signing will follow the program.


 
 
 
 
 
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