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01 Sep 2006 - 02 Jun 2008
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EXHIBITIONS IN WASHINGTON, DC
Listening to Our Ancestors: The Art of Native Life Along the North Pacific Coast
February 3, 2006–January 2, 2007
Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World
Opening September 21, 2004
Our Peoples: Giving Voice to Our Histories
Opening September 21, 2004
Our Lives: Contemporary Life and Identities
Opening September 21, 2004

EXHIBITIONS IN NEW YORK
Beauty Surrounds Us
September 23, 2006–September 23, 2008
Indigenous Motivations: Recent Acquisitions from the National Museum of the American Indian
July 22, 2006–July 22, 2007
Born of Clay: Ceramics from the National Museum of the American Indian
November 5, 2005–May 30, 2007



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2006
PERFORMANCES
NATIVE PERFORMANCE: The Captivation of Eunice Williams
Friday, October 13, 2006
Saturday, October 14, 2006
Washington DC
Rasmuson Theater
7 p.m. Panel discussion
8 p.m. Opera performance
This new opera is based on a 1704 incident in which Eunice Williams, a young girl from Deerfield, Massachusetts, was captured and raised by Mohawks from the Kahnawake community, along the banks of the St. Lawrence River. Eunice's family tried to ransom her back, urging her to return to the Puritan culture in which she spent her early years, but she chose to remain with her Mohawk family.
Composer Paula Kimper, librettist Harley Erdman, and producer/director Linda McInerney, are non-Natives, but they consulted with tribal leaders from Kahnawake in creating this work. The opera has received overwhelmingly positive responses from audiences in Deerfield, Cooperstown, New York, and at Kahnawake itself.
A pre-performance discussion will look at how this story might be told from a Native perspective. Panelists will include Native historians and performers and the opera's creators. These performances are sponsored in part by the International Music and Art Foundation.
Tickets required. Members - $20; Senior Members - $18; General Admission - $25, and Students - $15. For tickets please call 202-357-3030 or visit ResidentAssociates.org​.
PERFORMANCES
Yarina
Saturday, October 14, 2006, 1 p.m. & 3:30 p.m.
Sunday, October 15, 2006, 1 p.m. & 3:30 p.m.
New York
Rotunda
Through music and dance, the members of Yarina are dedicated to the preservation of indigenous Andean traditions.
FILMS
Daily Screenings
October 2, 2006–October 27, 2006, 1 pm, 3 pm and Thursdays at 5:30 pm
Daily
New York
The Screening Room, Second Floor
Hopiit (1984, 14 min.) Victor Masayesva, Jr. (Hopi) Impressionistic views from the Hopi Pueblos highlight changes in village life during the four seasons
Kiowa Cradleboard Maker: The Art and Tradition of Vanessa Jennings (30 min.) Director: Scott Swearingen and Sandy Rhoades. Indian people of many tribes celebrate and honor the birth of a child with a cradleboard. Vanessa Jennings, a Kiowa beadworker and cradleboard maker, carries on this tradition. Crafted from wood and rawhide, beautifully decorated, cradleboards link families and generations.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Paawats Family Activity Room
May 3, 2006–January 2, 2007, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Daily
Washington DC
Listening to Our Ancestors exhibition, Third Level
Visit the Paawats Family Activity Room, which is part of the Listening to Our Ancestors exhibition. Paawats means "bird's nest" or "place where learning takes place" in the language of the Nuu-chah-nulth people. In this part of the gallery, you can handle fishing tools, practice weaving, play a matching game, learn a story, and try lots of other fun act ivities!
Visit the Welcome Desk the day of your visit for more information.
FILMS
Daily Screenings - Celebrate Latin America
October 1, 2006–October 31, 2006, 10:30 am
Daily
Washington DC
Elmer and Mary Louis Rasmuson Theater, First Level
Showtimes and titles screened are subject to change. For more information, please stop by the Information Desk the day of your visit.
Turix/Dragonfly (2003, 33 min.) MEXICO. Director: Byrt Wammack. Producer: Ana Rosa Duarte (Maya). Produced by: Yoochel Kaaj. In the state of Yucatán, an eclectic, multilingual television magazine is being produced by workshops of Maya, Zapotec, Mixtec, Tzeltal, and Chol videomakers, in collaboration with other contributors.
FILMS
Especially for Kids
October 2, 2006–October 31, 2006, 10:30 am and 11:45 am
Daily
New York
The Screening Room, Second Floor
Paulina and the Condor (1995, 10 min.) Marisol Barragan. Bolivia. An animation tells the story of an Aymara girl of Bolivia who leaves her mountain home to live in the city.
Onenhakenra: White Seed (1984, 20 min.). U.S. Frank Semmens for the Akwesasne Museum. Mohawks of the Akwesasne Reservation talk about the role of corn in their culture and show the making of traditional corn soup and corn husk dolls.
Raven Tales: How Raven Stole the Sun (2004, 23 min.) U.S./Canada. Chris Kientz (Cherokee) and Simon James (Kwakwaka'wakw). A computer animation based on a traditional tale from the North Pacific Coast brings to life the comic and creative interaction of Eagle, Frog, and Raven at the beginning of time—and how Raven brings daylight to the world
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
CULTUREFEST 2006
Saturday, October 14, 2006, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sunday, October 15, 2006, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Battery Park (adjacent to the GGHC)
The museum is pleased to participate in this annual family-friendly celebration in adjacent Battery Park.
FILMS
Signature Film A Thousand Roads
September 15, 2006–November 22, 2006, 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Daily
Washington DC
Rasmuson Theater
(2005, 43 min.) U.S. Director: Chris Eyre (Cheyenne/Arapaho). Writers: Scott Garen and Joy Harjo (Mvskoke/Creek). Produced by Barry Clark and Scott Garen for the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. Executive Producer: W. Richard West, Jr. (Southern Cheyenne).
An emotionally engaging film, A Thousand Roads is a fictional work that illustrates the complexity and vibrancy of contemporary Native life by following the lives of four Native people living in New York City, Alaska, New Mexico, and Peru. Free. No tickets required. For ages 12 and up.
Film schedule subject to change.
FILMS
Native Film Welcome Home
September 15, 2006–November 22, 2006, 12:30 and 2:30 p.m.
Daily
Washington DC
Rasmuson Theater
(2005, 13 min.) U.S. In September 2004, thousands of Native peoples from throughout the Western Hemisphere and non-Native supporters gathered to celebrate the grand opening of the National Museum of the American Indian. Welcome Home captures the spirit and energy of the historic Native Nations Procession and other celebratory events.
Film schedule subject to change.
FILMS
Daily Screenings - Celebrate Latin America
October 1, 2006–October 31, 2006, 3:30 pm
Daily
Washington DC
Elmer and Mary Louis Rasmuson Theater, First Level
Showtimes and titles screened are subject to change. For more information, please stop by the Information Desk the day of your visit.
La Ofrenda: The Days of the Dead (1988, 50 min.) US. Director: Lourdes Portillo and Susana Muñoz. A visually rich documentary shot in Mexico and California explores the joyous and sad meanings of the Day of the Dead and its place in Mexican and Chicano heritage.
WORKSHOPS
Children's Storybook Reading and Workshop
Saturday, October 14, 2006, noon
New York
Resource Center, second floor
Listen to readings of Day of the Dead inspired stories, then join the hands-on workshop and decorate a paper-mâché skull.
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