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Tuesday, 13 November, 2007, 20:4 ( 18:4 GMT )
Several Animal Species Adapt to Libya’s Climatic Conditions
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 21)

There are historical documents that prove, beyond reasonable doubt that as relatively recent as two thousand years ago animal life may have abounded in those regions of Libya that are today considered to be semi-barren. (pictured: Horned desert viper)
Gateway Journey to the Wonders of the Desert of Akakus
One of the important aspects of any organised trip is that it reassures the traveler from the outset and that it embeds everlasting memories to treasure for life. From the moment we alighted down the steps of the Bouraq Air flight to Sebha and met our friends at the start of our four-day 1265km desert trip, we knew that our Gateway journey to the wonders of the Desert of Akakus was going to be an unforgettable experience.
Ice Age Caused ‘Living Things’ to Disappear
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 20)

Several archaeologists believe that prehistoric people who executed the drawings in solid rock at The Fezzan and other nearby places must have seen both the animals and the fauna in the immediate vicinity of where they did their sketches.
Thousands of Years Ago There Was Life in the Desert
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 19)

Until the First of September 1969 Revolution started to reclaim the desert and to develop the interior of the country, Libya’s coastal belt itself was a narrow strip of land that only occasionally widened ... and narrowed still further where the encroaching fingers of the desert edge imperceptibly towards the sea.
The Principal Outstanding Landmarks of The Fezzan
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 18)

Over the years since the Revolution, important changes started to take place in Libya. Development was not restricted solely to the coastal belt. On the contrary, large expanses of previous desert started to be reclaimed and within the deep interior of the land, instead of previous barrenness and wilderness, life started to emerge. (Pictured: The old town of Ghat, dominated by an Italian fort.
Libya to Celebrate Eid Al-Fitr on Friday
Eid Mubark. Libya will celebrate Eid Al-Fitr, the holiday marking the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, on Friday as the celebration will continue for three days.
Size of Country Made it Hard to Explore Further
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 17)

Since the earliest known civilisations that had settled in North Africa, particularly in Libya, the coastal belt that stretches from Tunisia in the west, to Egypt in the east, was the region more readily developed, from the days of the Phoenicians to almost contemporary times.
Jebel Akhdar: Highest Rate of Rainfall on Land, Supports Great Wealth of Flora
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 16)

Libyans enthusiastically welcomed the ambitious plans announced recently by Seif Al-Islam Al-Qathafi when he launched the world’s first large-scale conservation and sustainable development project in the mountainous region of Jebel Akhdar (Green Mountain). It was most fitting that the launch of the ecological and cultural project, aimed at safeguarding the country’s archaeological sites and preventing the overdevelopment of its rugged Mediterranean coastline was launched at Cyrene.
Libya’s Three Main Regions: Tripolitania, Cyrenaica and The Fezzan
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 15)

Libya is perhaps one of the few countries in the world where the natural heritage has remained unspoilt, and where the environment has not yet been threatened by the technology of the modern day.
Born Out of the Great Deserts of North Africa
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 14)

The territory of Libya reaches its furthest point south, deep into the interior of Africa, on the frontier with northern Sudan and extends its northernmost point by the Mediterranean Sea. There are at least 2,000 kilometres of coastline and it is not surprising that in the past Libya was generally known as the “Gateway to Africa” and the link between Europe and Africa. (pictued: A panoramic view of “Jebel Akhdar”)
Imposing Presence of the Sahara Dominates Land
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 13)

Libya today is a country vastly different from the distant old days when the first settlers, presumably the Phoenicians first set foot on North African land. Through the civilisations that have emerged and disappeared from this country, a new generation has come forward to meet the challenges of the modern world.
Halaq Al Reeh - The Story of a Social Revolution
Book Review by Ghazi Gheblawi of A novel by Salih Senoussi
(Dar Al Helal 2002 - Cairo (159 pages)

This is the story of social evolution, it tells us how we came to be what we are now, and why we face the world the way we do. It is the story of Halaq Al Reeh, which can be literally translated as ‘The Wind Valley’, and the people who dwell this mythical land.
Tolmeitha (Formerly Ptolémaïs)
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 12)

Libya is the undiscovered gold mine of North Africa. It was once known as the breadbasket of Rome, and dotted all along the coast between Tobruk and Tripoli are some of the most spectacular and unspoiled Roman ruins in the world.
Apollonia: The City of Churches
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 11)

CYRENE was not the only city-state to be built by the Greeks during the hey-day of their empire and their years across the Mediterranean in Libya. In spite of human ravages and natural disasters, most of the monuments of Cyrene have nonetheless survived.
Drops of Horror: First Horror Movie to be Produced in Libya
IN the midst of murder and mystery an intricate tale of horror holds audiences in suspense. Entitled: Drops of Horror, its producers have affirmed that this is the first horror film to be produced in Libya.
 
 
View Archived Articles
 
 More Stories 
 Gateway Journey to the Wonders of the Desert of Akakus 
 Ice Age Caused ‘Living Things’ to Disappear 
 Thousands of Years Ago There Was Life in the Desert 
 The Principal Outstanding Landmarks of The Fezzan 
 Libya to Celebrate Eid Al-Fitr on Friday 
 Size of Country Made it Hard to Explore Further 
 Jebel Akhdar: Highest Rate of Rainfall on Land, Supports Great Wealth of Flora 
 Libya’s Three Main Regions: Tripolitania, Cyrenaica and The Fezzan 
 Born Out of the Great Deserts of North Africa 
 Imposing Presence of the Sahara Dominates Land 
 Opinion 
 The Committee: Men, Lies and Manipulation Behind the Iraq War 
 A Four-part article By:
Morgan Strong
 
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Several Animal Species Adapt to Libya’s Climatic Conditions
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 21)

There are historical documents that prove, beyond reasonable doubt that as relatively recent as two thousand years ago animal life may have abounded in those regions of Libya that are today considered to be semi-barren. (pictured: Horned desert viper)
Ice Age Caused ‘Living Things’ to Disappear
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 20)

Several archaeologists believe that prehistoric people who executed the drawings in solid rock at The Fezzan and other nearby places must have seen both the animals and the fauna in the immediate vicinity of where they did their sketches.
 
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