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07 Sep 2003 - 11 Feb 2021
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FILMS
DAILY SCREENINGS: Mexico Adentro/Within Mexico
October 1, 2008–October 31, 2008
Daily
Rasmuson Theater

12:30 p.m.
Dulce Convivencia/Sweet Gathering (2004, 18 min.) Director: Filoteo Gómez (Mixtec)
A filmmaker's focus on the production of panela (raw brown sugar) in his home town in Oaxaca provides insight into the strength and rewards of the indigenous way of life. In Mixe with English subtitles.
3:30 p.m.
Radio Chanul Pom, From the Heart of the Highlands of Chiapas (2005, 19 min.) Director:José Alfredo Jiménez (Tsotzil)
In the Los Altos region of Chiapas, a vivacious radio station connects the Tzeltal and Tzotzil people living in the municipality of Chenhaló. In Spanish, Tzeltal, Tzotzil with English subtitles.
K'evujel ta Jteklum/Song of Our Land (2005, 36 min.) Director: Pedro Daniel López (Tzotzil)
An insider's guide to the Tzotzil musical tradition in Zinacantán, Chiapas, where musicians participate in traditional rituals and contribute to the continuity of their culture. In Tzotzil with English subtitles.
 


 
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
DAILY STORY READINGS: For Families with Children
October 3, 2008–January 4, 2009, 11:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.
Daily
Resource Center, Third level

Story readings featuring books from the Eyes of the Eagle book series. (Video presentation is also available at these times.)
 



 
Ofelia Zepeda
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
The Vine Deloria, Jr. Native Writers Series: Ofelia Zepeda
Wednesday, October 15, 2008, 6:30 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

Poetry reading, discussion, and book signing. Ofelia Zepeda is a poet and linguist from the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona. She has written numerous books including, A Papago Grammar, Ocean Power: Poems from the Desert, and Jewed 'I-Hoi/Earth Movements. She is a professor at the University of Arizona and co-founder of AILDI (American Indian Language Development Institute). Zepeda writes poetry in English and Tohono O'odham. Her new book, Where Clouds Are Formed, is collection of poetry. A book signing follows the program.
 


 
 
WORKSHOPS
Teacher Workshop: Oral Traditions
Saturday, October 18, 2008, 8:30 a.m.�1 p.m.
Beyond their abilities to connect people to place, provide humor, or teach important life lessons, stories emphasize the importance of language and memory. Through American Indian stories and class dialogue, teachers will gain an understanding of the ways that oral traditions promote continuity and preservation of culture for American Indian people.
Teachers can get more information about registering for workshops on the education page of the museum's website at www.AmericanIndian.si.edu/education​.
 


 
Los Días de los Muertos/Day of the Dead
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Los Días de los Muertos/Day of the Dead Two-Day Celebration
Saturday, November 1, 2008, 10:30 a.m.�4 p.m.
Sunday, November 2, 2008, 10:30 a.m.�4 p.m.
The Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian and the National Museum of American History are co-sponsoring a celebration of the Latin American holiday Los Días de los Muertos (Days of the Dead), with a two-day family-friendly event at the National Museum of the American Indian Mall Museum.
10:30 a.m. – 12 noon, Potomac Alcove

Traditional papel picado ("cut paper work") demonstration by Catalina Delgado-Trunk (Mexican of Nahuatl/Culhuacán paternal ancestry). Throughout Mexico, banners depicting human and animal skeletons engaged in daily life activities are cut from colored tissue paper and displayed around the altars. The fragile paper has come to symbolize the temporary nature of mortal existence, and returning spirits are said to pass through the openings cut in the banners.

Sugar Skull demonstration with Lucina Flores ( Mexica)

Ofrenda ("Altar" or "offering") demonstration featuring Guatemalan kites by Evelyn Orantes (Guatemalan Maya)

Paper Sculpture and Paper Mache demonstrationby Ruben Guzman Campos (Zapotec)
10:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., Outdoor Firepit
The Museum's celebrated Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe will demonstrate how to prepare some of the special foods created for the Muertos celebration, including mole, pan de muerto, and tortillas.
12 noon, The Potomac

Los Tecuanes, based in Manassas, Virginia, are from Acatlán de Osorio in the Mexican state of Puebla. They will reenact a Mexican colonial dance drama called La Danza de los Tecuanes (the Dance of the Tigers/Jaguars) that takes place throughout parts of Mexico.
1:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Potomac Alcove Demonstrations

Traditional papel picado ("cut paper work") demonstration by Catalina Delgado-Trunk (Mexican of Nahuatl/Culhuacán paternal ancestry)
Sugar Skull demonstration with Lucina Flores (Mexica)
Ofrenda ("Altar" or "offering") demonstration featuring Guatemalan kites by Evelyn Orantes (Guatemalan Maya)
Paper Sculpture and Paper Mache demonstrationby Ruben Guzman Campos (Zapotec)
2:30 p.m., The Potomac
Los Tecuanes, based in Manassas, Virginia, are from Acatlán de Osorio in the Mexican state of Puebla.
The Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe will feature a special menu for the weekend, including roasted chicken with a vanilla-cinnamon mole sauce, two sides, and pan de muertos (a special sweet bread made in honor of the occasion).
 


 
 
FILMS
DAILY SCREENINGS
November 1, 2008–November 30, 2008, 12:30 & 3:30 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

We Shall Remain: ReelNative
An excerpt of short works created during the We Shall Remain: ReelNative workshop, an innovative outreach project that encourages Native Americans to give voice to their heritage and contemporary issues through video production. Presented as part of the PBS history series, American Experience. For more information, visit www.pbs.org/weshallremain​.
 



 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
Curatorial Talk
Saturday, November 1, 2008, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

In celebration of the opening weekend of the new blockbuster exhibition, Fritz Scholder: Indian/Not Indian, join curators Truman Lowe (Ho-Chunk) and Paul Chaat Smith (Comanche) for an in-depth discussion on Scholder's work and the museum's concurrent exhibitions in Washington and New York. Book signing to follow.
This program was made possible by a gift from Loren and Anne Kieve.
 


 
 
FILMS
Special Screenings: FILM INDIANS NOW!
Sunday, November 2, 2008, 2:00 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

NMAI's Film and Video Center and the National Gallery of Art present a remarkable eight part screening series, imparting fresh views regarding the Native American experience as described in contemporary Media. Each program will include a moderated discussion on how media affects and empowers our collective image of what a Native person is.
It's Not TV, It's Indians!
Three Native artists perform spoken word, song, and dance pieces inspired by their favorite "Indian" episode of television, offering a high-energy romper-room explosion of TV magic that will make you think about Native Americans in a new way.
 


 
 
PERFORMANCES
CLASSICAL NATIVE: Music for Young Audiences
Thursday, November 6, 2008, 10:30 and 11:45 a.m.
Friday, November 7, 2008, 10:30 and 11:45 a.m.
Rasmuson Theater

For the third year in a row the NMAI presents Native composers and classical musicians. Tickets required.
Swil Kanim (Lummi) combines virtuoso violin playing, story-telling, and original compositions into an engaging program that provides young audiences with background on how violins are made and played�and about the power of music in the world.
Co-sponsored by Discovery Theater and offered to school groups by advance registration only. For tickets and information visit www.discoverytheater.org or call 202-633-8700.
 


 
 
PERFORMANCES
CLASSICAL NATIVE: Young Classical Natives
Saturday, November 8, 2008, 1:00 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

For the third year in a row the NMAI presents Native composers and classical musicians. Most programs are free and open to the public.
Classical guitarist Emmanuel Gray (Navajo), a student at Ft. Lewis College, performs music by J.S. Bach, Heitor Villa-lobos, Francisco Tarrega, and Leo Brouwer, and the Philadelphia-based, all-female, all teenaged, Ambrosia Quartet, performs works by young composers Emmanuel Gray, Paris Fairbanks (Ojibway), Wyas Parker (Chickasaw), Coutrney Parchcorn (Chickasaw), Joel Waukazo (Ojibway), and Kate Duty (Chickasaw), all students of composer Jerod Tate (Chickasaw). Presented with support from the Chickasaw Nation.
 


 
 
PERFORMANCES
CLASSICAL NATIVE: New Music Showcase
Saturday, November 8, 2008, 4:00 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

Echoes, a new work by Randall Craig Fleischer, draws on themes from Alaska Natives, Native Hawaii, Wampanoag, and other American Indian sources, with chamber orchestra featuring several Native performers. A Washington, D.C., premiere, this work is presented with sponsorship from the ECHO Partners and a grant from the First Nations Composer Initiative's Common Ground grant program.
The program will also include "Corn-Bred," A performance of poetic movement with music,, by Janet-Marie Rogers, music by Dawn Avery, with flutist Lisa Long; and two movements of "Choctaw Diaries," by George Quincy (Choctaw), performed by Timothy Archambault (Kichesipirini), flute, and George Quincy, piano.
 


 
 
PERFORMANCES
CLASSICAL NATIVE: Recital
Saturday, November 8, 2008, 7:30 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

Tickets required.
Violin virtuoso Tara-Louise Montour (Mohawk) and esteemed pianist/conductor Timothy Long (Muskogee-Creek/Choctaw) perform classic and contemporary works for violin and piano and solo piano, including Claude Debussy's "Sonata for Violin and Piano" and "Three Romances" for violin and piano by Clara Schumann. This program is part of Native Expressions, co-sponsored by The Smithsonian Associates.
For information visit www.residentassociates.org or call 202-633-3030. NMAI members receive a discount on tickets.
 


 
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
TEACHER WORKSHOP
Teaching with Images: Shaping Views of American Indians
Saturday, November 8, 2008, 8:30 a.m.�1 p.m.
In celebration of the exhibition, Fritz Scholder: Indian/Not Indian, this workshop will help teachers integrate contemporary images of Native peoples into classroom discussions through an interdisciplinary focus on contemporary social, political, and environmental issues. We encourage teachers to team up across subject areas (i.e. art, social studies/history, language arts, special education) for this workshop.
Teachers can get more information about registering for workshops on the education page of the museum's website at www.AmericanIndian.si.edu/education​.
 


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
Native Veterans in the Historical Record: Searching military records from the 1800s
Saturday, November 8, 2008, 1�2:30 p.m.
Room 4018, Fourth level

Presented by Trevor Plante of the National Archives, this talk will cover researching Native Veterans serving in the United States Military during the 19th Century. Mr. Plante is an archivist in the Textual Reference Services Division of the National Archives.
 



 
 
PERFORMANCES
CLASSICAL NATIVE: Three Sides: A Multi-Media Collaboration
Sunday, November 9, 2008, 1:00 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

For the third year in a row the NMAI presents Native composers and classical musicians. Most programs are free and open to the public.

Composer/cellist/vocalist Dawn Avery (Mohawk descent), percussionist/vocalist Steven Alvarez (Yaqui/Mescalero Apache/Upper Tanana Athabaskan), and violinist Tara-Louise Montour (Mohawk) form a new Native classical chamber music trio, Three Sides. Three new works, including video and narration, will be premiered by the trio. Narratives by poet Janet-Marie Rogers (Mohawk/ Tuscarora), vidoegraphy by Chris Bose (N'laka pamux), and a narrative ceremony led by elder Jan Longboat (Mohawk), will be joined with compositions by Dawn Avery.
Composition of these new works was supported by as award from the NMAI's Expressive Arts program. Performances on Nov. 4, 7, and 9 are supported by a grant from the Montgomery College Arts Institute.
 



 
 
PERFORMANCES
CLASSICAL NATIVE: Recital
Tuesday, November 11, 2008, 7:30 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

For the third year in a row the NMAI presents Native composers and classical musicians. Most programs are free and open to the public.
Tickets required.
Piano recital by Italian virtuoso Emanuele Arciuli of works by five prominent Native composers: Louis Ballard (Quapaw/Cherokee), Raven Chacon (Navajo), Brent Michael Davids (Mohican), Barbara Croall (Odawa), George Quincy (Choctaw); the program will also include Andrea Morricone's "Penobscot Song of Greeting" and "Phrygian Gates" by John Adams. For tickets, visit www.residentassociates.org or call 202-633-3030. NMAI members receive a discount on tickets.
Co-sponsored by The Smithsonian Associates.
 


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
Warriors in Uniforms: Veteran's Day Book Program
Tuesday, November 11, 2008, 1:00 � 3:00 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

Book panel discussion and book signing. Native Americans have served in the U.S. military since the American Revolution and by percentage, serve more than any other ethnic group in the armed forces. Historian Herman J. Viola has included these heroic and unforgettable stories in his latest book, Warriors in Uniforms: The Legacy of American Indian Heroism (National Geographic, November 2008).

The book program includes a panel discussion with the author and five Native American veterans featured in the book: Dr. Joseph Medicine Crow (Crow), World War II; Vernon Tsoodle (Kiowa), Korean War; James Chastain (Lumbee), Vietnam War; Sgt. Debra Kay Mooney (Choctaw), Iraq; and Sgt. Chuck Boers (Lipan Apache/Cherokee), Iraq. A book signing will follow.
The program is free and open to the public but space is limited.
In partnership with the National Geographic Society.
 



 
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
ROUND DANCE!
Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 11:30 a.m.�1 p.m.
Potomac

This style of dance is a social occasion often held during the cold months in the northern U.S. and Canada. Also known as the friendship dance, participants form a circle in which the dancers often hold hands with their neighbors while side-stepping to the left. Everybody dance!
 



 
Kevin Gover (Pawnee/Comanche)
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
Harvest of Hope: A Symposium on Reconciliation
Thursday, November 13, 2008, 4:00 � 6:30 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, this stimulating and insightful forum moderated by NMAI Director Kevin Gover (Pawnee/Comanche) focuses on topical issues of reconciliation and highlights national apologies made to Native peoples, including the Native American Apology Resolution recently passed by the United States Senate.
 


 
Delanna Studi in KICK. Photo courtesy of Encompass.
 
PERFORMANCES
Native Theater: KICK
Friday, November 14, 2008, 10:30 a.m. & 1:30 p.m., Reservations required.
Saturday, November 15, 2008, 11:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m., Reservations required.
Rasmuson Theater

Encompass' Compassion Plays tour to the National Museum of the American Indian as part of American Indian Heritage Month and during the heart of football season. This 90-minute program features a pre-show discussion, the featured play KICK, and then a post-show discussion so that teens may explore the ever-relevant topic of Indian mascots.
Tradition or travesty? Kick explores racial stereotyping and the American Indian mascot issue through the eyes of Grace Greene, one of the few Native American students at Newman High School. When Grace decides to take a stand against her school's "brave" mascot, she learns that sometimes sports are far more than just fun and games.
Kick tells the story of a week in the life of Grace Greene. It's a big week—Homecoming Week— when tradition and school spirit become fighting words. An incident of vandalism to her school's beloved logo—the Newman Brave—begins a chain of events that change Grace, her family and her community. http://www.encompass.org/compassionplays/
Seats are limited and on a first-come, first-served basis. To reserve seating: 202-633-6644 or TTY 202-633-6751.
 


 
 
WORKSHOPS
FAMILY PROGRAMS: Join the Harvest
Saturday, November 15, 2008, 11 a.m.�4 p.m.
Sunday, November 16, 2008, 11 a.m.�4 p.m.
Family Programs will hold special fall harvest programming in conjunction with the exhibit, Through the Eyes of the Eagle, with harvest themes
Celebrate an early Thanksgiving with the National Museum of the American Indian. Families can try their hands at traditional corn grinding, make a cornhusk doll, and take a special family tour. You can learn how to gather seeds for planting next spring.
Hear about native foods, many of which can be found on Thanksgiving tables today and watch demonstrations of how they are prepared, and learn about the importance of corn, beans, and squash � known to Indian people as the three sisters � to Native people throughout this hemisphere.
 


 
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Community Programs: Mini Powwow
Saturday, November 22, 2008, 1:00 � 5:00 p.m.
Potomac

Powwows are a Celebration of Being Indian. The Potomac Atrium will resound with powerful drumbeats during this insightful and highly interactive mini powwow featuring dance exhibitions, stories and songs from indigenous tribes of North America. Join in an intertribal war dance, round dance and Indian two-step. Commentary of these dances will precede each dance. Families, international visitors and multicultural audiences are encouraged to attend!
 



 
 
FILMS
Special Screenings: FILM INDIANS NOW!
Sunday, November 23, 2008, 2:00 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

NMAI's Film and Video Center and the National Gallery of Art present a remarkable eight part screening series, imparting fresh views regarding the Native American experience as described in contemporary Media. Each program will include a moderated discussion on how media affects and empowers our collective image of what a Native person is.
THE DOUBLE ENTENDRE OF RE-ENACTMENT: An Interactive Program with Gerald McMaster
A subversive and often humorous examination of the historical re-enactment from its roots—as far back as the American artist George Catlin—to today's young Native American artists who are reinterpreting re-enactment as a means of artistic defiance.
 



 
Dovie Thomason
 
PERFORMANCES
CELEBRATE THANKSGIVING at the NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN!
Friday, November 28, 2008
Rasmuson Theater

11:30 a.m.; 1:30 & 3:30 p.m.
Native Storytelling with Sunny Dooley
Sunny Dooley (Navajo) is from a community in New Mexico called Chi Chil' Tah ("where the oaks grow"). The Blessing Way stories that she will share have been passed down through her matrilineal clan, the Tódik´ózi (Saltwater People), for generations. A fluent speaker of the Diné language and a strong advocate for indigenous languages, Sunny incorporates Diné into her performances.
12:30 & 2:30 p.m.
Native Storytelling with Dovie Thomason
Dovie Thomason celebrates her Lakota Sioux and Kiowa Apache heritage through traditional stories learned from her grandmother and tellers of many Native nations―stories that inspire delight in the spoken word and teach respect. The importance of choices―whether made by a talkative turtle or a bullying fox―are at the heart of her stories.
 


 
Sunny Dooley
 
PERFORMANCES
CELEBRATE THANKSGIVING AT THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN!
Saturday, November 29, 2008, 11:30 a.m.; 12:30, 2:30, 3:30 p.m.
Sunday, November 30, 2008, 11:30 a.m.; 12:30, 2:30 & 3:30 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

Native Storytelling with Sunny Dooley
Sunny Dooley (Navajo) is from a community in New Mexico called Chi Chil' Tah ("where the oaks grow"). The Blessing Way stories that she will share have been passed down through her matrilineal clan, the Tódik´ózi (Saltwater People), for generations. A fluent speaker of the Diné language and a strong advocate for indigenous languages, Sunny incorporates Diné into her performances.
 


 
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
"Hok-noth-da?" Reading Program
Wednesday, December 3, 2008, 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday, December 17, 2008, 11:00 a.m.
Resource Center, 3rd level

Listen! I have a story to tell

Join us for a twenty-minute Reading Program of books by or about Native American people for student groups (Grades K-4) and families. Presenters include Native staff from the museum.
You may reserve space for students by calling: 202-633-6644 or email: NMAI-GroupReservations@si.edu
"Hok-noth-da?" means "Did you hear?" in the Shawnee language.
 


 
NMAI Art Market
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
NMAI ART MARKET
Saturday, December 6, 2008, 10 a.m.�5:30 p.m.
Sunday, December 7, 2008, 10 a.m.�5:30 p.m.
Potomac

The Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian Art Market will be held indoors at the National Museum of the American Indian on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., and at the museum's George Gustav Heye Center in New York City. At each location, the Art Market will feature works by 35 Native artists including: jewelry; ceramics; fine apparel; handwoven baskets; traditional beadwork; dolls in Native regalia; and paintings, prints and sculpture.
 


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
Views from the Field: Alan Cheuse and Colin Sargent
Saturday, December 13, 2008, 2:00 p.m.
Rooms 4018-19, Fourth level

Book discussion and book signing. Alan Cheuse is the "voice of books" as a book commentator on National Public Radio's "All Things Considered." He is the author of four novels, three collections of short fiction, and a memoir. His latest book, To Catch the Lightning: A Novel of American Dreaming (Sourcebooks Landmark, October 2008) is the life story of Edward Curtis, famed photographer of American Indians. Cheuse teaches in the writing program at George Mason University.
Colin Sargent is a playwright and the author of three books of poetry. He is also the founder and publisher of Portland Magazine and lives in Portland, Maine. Sargent's most recent book, Museum of Human Beings (McBooks Press, November 2008), delves into the heart wrenching life of Jean-Baptiste Charbonneau, the son of Sacagawea. In partnership with the Writer's Center, Bethesda, Maryland.
 


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
Spotlight on Native Athletes: Ted Nolan
Sunday, December 14, 2008, 11:00 a.m.
Rooms 4018-19, Fourth level

Interview and discussion. Ted Nolan (Ojibway) is a retired hockey player and former National Hockey League coach of the Buffalo Sabres and the New York Islanders. He is from the Garden River First Nation Reserve in Ontario, Canada. Nolan received the Jack Adams Trophy for NHL coach of the year (1996-97 season). For his efforts with Native children and athletics, he has received the National Aboriginal Achievement Award, the Sault Ste. Marie Medal of Merit, and the Order of Ontario. The program will be moderated by Eric Brady, sports writer for USA Today.
 



 
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Storytelling and book release: The Origin of the Milky Way
Saturday, December 20, 2008, 11:30 a.m.
Rasmuson Theater

Book release and storytelling. Barbara Duncan, the education director at the Museum of the Cherokee Indian, has compiled and edited a book on Cherokee stories for readers age 9 and up. The book, The Origin of the Milky Way and Other Living Stories of the Cherokee (University of North Carolina Press, November 2008), presents 27 stories from well-known storytellers of the Eastern Band of Cherokee in North Carolina. The stories talk about how things came to be, lessons on life, and the plants and animals around them. The program includes author Barbara Duncan and Cherokee storyteller Freeman Owle. A book signing will follow.

In partnership with the University of North Carolina Press.
 



 
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
"Hok-noth-da?" Reading Program
Wednesday, January 7, 2009, 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday, January 21, 2009, 11:00 a.m.
Resource Center, Third level

Listen! I have a story to tell

Join us for a twenty-minute Reading Program of books by or about Native American people for student groups (Grades K-4) and families. Presenters include Native staff from the museum.
You may reserve space for students by calling: 202-633-6644 or email: NMAI-GroupReservations@si.edu
"Hok-noth-da?" means "Did you hear?" in the Shawnee language.
 


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
Views from the Field: Ian Record
Saturday, January 10, 2009, 2:00 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

Book discussion and book signing. Ian W. Record is a senior lecturer in the American Indian Studies department at the University of Arizona. He is also the manager of educational resources at the Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy. Record is the author of Big Sycamore Stands Alone: The Western Apaches, Aravaipa, and the Struggle for Place (University of Oklahoma, December 2008). Arapaiva is the sacred homeland of the Western Apaches and the book examines the interconnectedness between people and place through oral histories and historic documentation.
 



 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
The Vine Deloria, Jr. Native Writers Series: William Hensley
Saturday, January 17, 2009, 2:00 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater

Book reading, discussion, and book signing. William Iggiagruk Hensley (Inupiaq) was born in Kotzebue, Alaska, about thirty miles above the Arctic Circle. Hensley served four years in the Alaska House of Representatives and six years in the Alaskan State Senate. He also was president of the Alaska Federation of Natives and worked with the NANA Regional Corporation, the United Bank Alaska, the Alaskan Department of Economic Development, and the Alyesha Pipeline Service Company. His autobiography, Fifty Miles from Tomorrow (Farrar , Straus & Giroux, January 2009), recounts his early years growing up in a fishing, hunting, and trapping village to then becoming a leader and tireless advocate for Native Alaskan rights.
In partnership with Sarah Crichton Books / Farrar, Straus & Giroux Books.
 


 
 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
"Hok-noth-da?" Reading Program
Wednesday, February 4, 2009, 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday, February 18, 2009, 11:00 a.m.
Resource Center, Third level

Listen! I have a story to tell

Join us for a twenty-minute Reading Program of books by or about Native American people for student groups (Grades K-4) and families. Presenters include Native staff from the museum.
You may reserve space for students by calling: 202-633-6644 or email: NMAI-GroupReservations@si.edu
"Hok-noth-da?" means "Did you hear?" in the Shawnee language.
 


 
 
TOURS, TALKS & LECTURES
The Vine Deloria, Jr. Native Writers Series: Drew Hayden Taylor
Thursday, February 12, 2009
12 noon, Rasmuson Theater
5:30 p.m., Mitsitam Café (Tickets required)
Book reading, discussion, and book signing. Drew Hayden Taylor (Ojibway, Curve Lake First Nations) is a novelist, journalist, playwright and filmmaker. A self-described "contemporary storyteller," he has written 20 books, including the Funny, You Don't Look Like One series about issues affecting Canada's First Nations. He has worked on more than 17 documentaries, most notably "Redskins, Tricksters, and Puppy Stew" for the National Film Board of Canada. Taylor served as an editor and contributor to the books, Me Funny and Me Sexy, about Native humor and Native sexuality, respectively.
At noon, Taylor will be discussing his gothic novel for teens, A Night Wanderer (Annick Press, 2007) and other new releases in the Rasmuson Theater. The evening event will be a Valentine's Day themed program for adults. Taylor will discuss Me Sexy in the museum's Mitsitam Native Foods Café with beverages and desserts for purchase. The evening program is free and open to the public but space is limited; advanced tickets are required.
 


 
    
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