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Saturday, 13 September, 2008, 23:50 ( 21:50 GMT )
“The Safest Desert”
World-renowned desert explorer, Carla Perrotti, whose daring desert explorations have earned her a global following, has gone where few humans have before: into some of the world’s most challenging deserts, alone, recently completed a historic solo walk across the Sahara’s Akakus Tadrark region in Libya.
First Attempts to Chart Central Parts of the African Continent
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 30)

Gordon Alexander Laing had to face a lot of problems before emerging as the first explorer from Europe to reach Timbuktu. In fact, in his letters he spoke about some of the problems he had to face to his health and from attacks on his caravan that left him wounded.
Laing: Left from Tripoli to Become First European to Reach Timbuktu
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 29)

The report by Captain Hugh Clapperton and Major Dixon Debham was immensely comprehensive, and it continued to shed further light on the customs of Africa at that time, particularly in relation to local traditions.
19th Century Explorers Tried to Explain So-called Mysteries of the African continent
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 28)

Centuries ago, the vast country of Libya proved to be very ‘fertile’ land for a great number of explorers, scientists and travellers, and after the expeditions mentioned in the last article, particularly by Dr Joseph Ritchie and Captain Francis Lyon, others followed during the years 1821 and 1822. Foremost of these was that led by Frederick William Beechey, artist, explorer, hydrographer, and author whose expedition is recorded as one of the more rewarding at that period in time.
Early Explorers of Libya Shed Light on Early Civilisations
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 27)

Over the centuries the vast terrain that makes up the country of Libya has inevitably attracted the curiosity of many explorers, scientists and travellers. This has been particularly true of the seventeenth and eighteenth century, when most of the northern and central parts of the African continent were still unexplored.
Libya - Physically Huge; A Land of Contrasts
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 26)

The dry desiccating wind that blows from the desert and carries towers of dust, better known as “Ghibli” that was mentioned in the previous article is by no means the only wind that is typical of this part of the world, particularly Libya. It has its counterparts elsewhere on the African continent. All are considered evil and feared by the desert dwellers of North Africa.
Climatic Contrasts Make Libya Even More Interesting
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 25)

Many travel writers have repeatedly described Libya as a land of many contrasts. Strictly speaking this is true in the sense that it is very difficult to generalise, particularly as the
country’s climate conditions and terrain are concerned.
A Dry Land But for the Winter Months
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 24)

At this stage the impression must not be given that it never rains in Libya. Although rainfall is not frequent, the highest level takes place in the hills of Cyrenaica and Tripolitania. (Pictured: Dust storm over Libya)
‘Man-Made River’ Project Improves Libya’s Agriculture
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 23)

When completed, the Great Man-Made River, the largest water transport project ever undertaken, described by many as the “Eighth Wonder of the World” would carry more than five million cubic metres of water per day across the desert to coastal areas, vastly increasing the amount of arable land.
Man-Made River -Project Aimed at Solving Problem of Water Shortage
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 22)

Not unlike other countries of the Mediterranean, Libya has none of the dangerous species of hunting fish such as the sharks or the barracuda. However, close inshore swim such species as the angel fish, the octopi and the myriad forms of animal and plant life that sea bed supports, including sea eggs and sea porcupines, crabs and worms, and the profuse forms of vegetable growth.
Several Animal Species Adapt to Libya’s Climatic Conditions
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 21)

There are historical documents that prove, beyond reasonable doubt that as relatively recent as two thousand years ago animal life may have abounded in those regions of Libya that are today considered to be semi-barren. (Pictured: Desert horned viper)
Prince Andrew Visits Libya
Prince Andrew, son of Queen Elizabeth of England, is currently in Tripoli on an unofficial visit to Libya, he is to take a first hand look into the country’s archeological treasures and beautiful sand dunes at the Sahara desert.
Gateway Journey to the Wonders of the Desert of Akakus
One of the important aspects of any organised trip is that it reassures the traveler from the outset and that it embeds everlasting memories to treasure for life. From the moment we alighted down the steps of the Bouraq Air flight to Sebha and met our friends at the start of our four-day 1265km desert trip, we knew that our Gateway journey to the wonders of the Desert of Akakus was going to be an unforgettable experience.
Ice Age Caused ‘Living Things’ to Disappear
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 20)

Several archaeologists believe that prehistoric people who executed the drawings in solid rock at The Fezzan and other nearby places must have seen both the animals and the fauna in the immediate vicinity of where they did their sketches.
Thousands of Years Ago There Was Life in the Dese
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 19)

Until the First of September 1969 Revolution started to reclaim the desert and to develop the interior of the country, Libya’s coastal belt itself was a narrow strip of land that only occasionally widened ... and narrowed still further where the encroaching fingers of the desert edge imperceptibly towards the sea.
 
 
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 “The Safest Desert” 
 First Attempts to Chart Central Parts of the African Continent 
 Laing: Left from Tripoli to Become First European to Reach Timbuktu 
 19th Century Explorers Tried to Explain So-called Mysteries of the African continent 
 Early Explorers of Libya Shed Light on Early Civilisations 
 Libya - Physically Huge; A Land of Contrasts 
 Climatic Contrasts Make Libya Even More Interesting 
 A Dry Land But for the Winter Months 
 ‘Man-Made River’ Project Improves Libya’s Agriculture 
 Man-Made River -Project Aimed at Solving Problem of Water Shortage 
More Featured Articles
19th Century Explorers Tried to Explain So-called Mysteries of the African continent
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 28)

Centuries ago, the vast country of Libya proved to be very ‘fertile’ land for a great number of explorers, scientists and travellers, and after the expeditions mentioned in the last article, particularly by Dr Joseph Ritchie and Captain Francis Lyon, others followed during the years 1821 and 1822. Foremost of these was that led by Frederick William Beechey, artist, explorer, hydrographer, and author whose expedition is recorded as one of the more rewarding at that period in time.
Early Explorers of Libya Shed Light on Early Civilisations
Libya: Archaeology and Civilisation (Part 27)

Over the centuries the vast terrain that makes up the country of Libya has inevitably attracted the curiosity of many explorers, scientists and travellers. This has been particularly true of the seventeenth and eighteenth century, when most of the northern and central parts of the African continent were still unexplored.
 
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