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09 Dec 2008 - 21 Apr 2020
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16 November, 2010
Interviewing Politicians Made Easier
Posted by worldservicetrust under Uncategorized | Tags: journalism​, media training |
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By Nick Raistrick, BBC WST Journalism Training Editor
When I used to interview football managers on a regular basis there was always a fine line between:
1) Asking the dull questions the manager wanted you to ask but boring your readers.
2) Asking the controversial questions your listeners wanted to hear, but which would get you barred from the ground by the irate coach.
In some developing and transitional countries there’s a similar problem when reporting politics and interviewing politicians – except it’s much, much worse.
Of course there’s the threat of being excluded from future press conferences and interviews, and therefore losing your job. And there’s sometimes the threat of closure, physical violence or imprisonment.
Even where a journalist feels safe, it could be that the local important politician [or ‘big man’] dominates proceedings; leaders are often important, articulate and sometimes threatening people.
It all makes interviewing authority figures very difficult.
So how can you make sure politicians don’t dominate your interview or discussion/call-in show?
Hopefully this quick guide will be useful. It’s based on experiences in East Africa but, hopefully, will be relevant elsewhere. If it isn’t, or you disagree with any of my ideas, please contribute to the conversation by leaving a comment.
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19 July, 2010
Condom is just another word
Posted by worldservicetrust under Uncategorized | Tags: AIDS2010​, Condom Condom​, health, HIV/AIDS |
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The BBC World Service Trust team from India are showcasing our condom normalisation campaign “Condom, Condom” at the International Aids Conference in Vienna this week. Check back here for blog updates from the team, plus footage from their interactive stand, as they remind people that “Condom is just another word”.
Visit the brand new condomcondom.org site for more on how the BBC WST’s work in India is helping to change attitudes towards condoms, plus view the full story of the last three years on our YouTube channel here.
 
21 April, 2010
Jesse Jagz, an ENR star
Posted by worldservicetrust under Enhancing Nigeria's Response to HIV and Aids | Tags: nigeria, bbc world service trust, Enhancing Nigeria's Response to HIV and Aids, hiv, jesse jagz, hip-hop, hausa |
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While the youth radio programmes are integral components of the ENR project, I have never had a chance to see the teams in action. I have participated in their script sessions as well as their listen-backs (the final feedback sessions), but only a few weeks ago did I get a chance to see how they actually create their content.
Recently a Nigerian artist named Jesse Jagz had an album release party. It took place in the Sheraton and nearly all my colleagues in Nigeria were fans of his – some took photos, some helped with the guests, and the two youth shows both recorded the event.
When I learned that both the youth teams (one in Hausa, the language of north Nigeria, and the other in Pidgin English) would both be recording, I immediately had two grave doubts: one, how does a hip-hop artist talking about how hot he is have anything to do with HIV and AIDS? Two, won’t the two youth production teams replicate each other’s shows?
What proceeded to happen blew my mind.
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8 April, 2010
Finding the gap
Posted by worldservicetrust under Enhancing Nigeria's Response to HIV and Aids | Tags: aids, hiv, nigeira, STI |
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During a recent ENR conference to build the capacity of local community service organizations, I found myself sitting on a bench in a shed that was a resting spot for transport drivers. We were in Benue state and it was hot – close to 38℃. Besides the scorching heat, Benue is also widely recognized as the state with the highest HIV prevalence rate, close to 7%, according to Nigeria’s National HIV & AIDS Reproductive Health Survey.
Project leaders from states around the country were about to conduct a survey to evaluate the knowledge of this “high risk” group. This practice focus group would test the project leaders’ ability to create conversation, draw answers from participants, and facilitate a discussion. Since research showed most of the new HIV cases from Benue result from transport workers, and since the state had a series of major transport hubs, we were all keen to hear the answers from this group
I was stunned by how much they knew. They could not only list different STIs, but also the symptoms and where to get them treated.
(more…)
 
2 March, 2010
A Day in the Life of the BBC World Service Trust
Posted by worldservicetrust under Uncategorized | Tags: africa talks climate, baba maal, bbc world service trust, climate change, cop16, copenhagen​, mexico, world have your say |
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And, what you’ve all been waiting for: a behind the scenes video showing what we got up to at the climate change summit in Copenhagen last December, where we hosted events with the megastar Baaba Maal, a world debate with a handful of presidents (including the leader of Mexico who’ll be hosting COP16) and an incredibly charged World Have Your Say with a concert hall full of teenagers .
Check it:
(For an edited transcript of Baaba’s talk and also to hear that edition of World Have Your Say, have a look at Africa Talks Climate​.)
 
2 March, 2010
Petition against Uganda’s anti-gay bill – audio
Posted by worldservicetrust under Uncategorized | Tags: Anti-Homosexuality Bill, Gideon Byamugisha​, human rights, media, uganda |
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Our colleagues over at the BBC Africa Service did an interview yesterday with the Anglican priest, Canon Gideon Byamugisha, who’s leading the campaign opposing Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill. His online petition has over 450,000 signatures from people around the world and yesterday it went to parliament.
However BBC East Africa correspondent Will Ross, says the fact that the vast majority of the signatures were from outside Uganda is significant, as the MPs would be more likely to take notice of Ugandan rather than international opposition to the bill.
For more on this issue, have a look at Rachael Borlase’s excellent article on the issues of reporting gay rights in Uganda’s rural media.
 
1 March, 2010
Chile’s earthquake and tsunami crisis – crucial role of media and governance
Posted by worldservicetrust under Uncategorized | Tags: bachelet​, chile, crisis, development​, disaster preparedness​, earthquake​, governance​, haiti, media, media sector, santiago​, tsunami |
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As Haiti slowly rebuilds after its catastrophic earthquake, over 3,000 miles across the Americas, another powerful earthquake and tsunami has struck Chile, displacing over two million people. So far Michelle Bachelet’s government is confident that the country’s strong internal infrastructures can cope with the crisis and manage the relief efforts.
Chile has spent many years building its media sector and disaster preparedness policies - what are the learnings from Santiago to Port-au-Prince?
Lisa Robinson, who helped to deliver Connexion Haiti, the BBC’s emergency lifeline radio programme, reports.
Soon after the earthquake struck in Chile, we considered whether lifeline broadcasting similar to that for Haiti would be necessary.  Watching and listening to local media, however, it was apparent they were doing a very good job of aiming to deliver vital information to affected populations.
Media’s ability to respond to the crises has differed drastically between Chile and Haiti.
Since Chile’s buildings were better prepared for earthquakes, structural damage was less and more stations were able to continue on air.
The extensive number of radio and TV stations in Chile means that there are significantly more resources to continue broadcasting.  In areas where the media infrastructure has been affected, neighbouring media can step in to help.
Natacha Pisarenko/AP photo
Content has delivered practical information that audiences can use to deal with the crisis.  From the early hours, TV reports were requesting drivers to stay off roads, giving updates on hospitals that were closed, assuring people that aftershocks were normal, and urging people to remain calm.
Chile’s national disaster preparedness mechanisms have facilitated the crucial delivery of information to the affected populations.  For example, when the emergency telephone line wasn’t working, replacement numbers were issued within hours and broadcast on TV.  President Bachelet has been on camera giving status updates regularly.
It’s too early to know the full extent of the damage and how audiences’ access to media has been interrupted in the most severely hit areas.  International media organisations may be on standby to deliver support where needed.  Meanwhile, they’ll be observing the information response and gathering learnings from Chile’s strong media sector.
 
5 February, 2010
Inspiration doesn’t happen overnight
Posted by worldservicetrust under Enhancing Nigeria's Response to HIV and Aids, Uncategorized | Tags: africa, bbc world service trust, communication​, Enhancing Nigeria's Response to HIV and Aids, film, HIV/AIDS​, journalism​, local media, media training, nasarawa​, nigeria, Radio, tv, workshops |
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Last week the TV training team travelled to Nasarawa state (adjacent to the capital). Here we were conducting a three day training workshop for broadcast TV trainers/ training managers and Community Service Organizations, followed directly by a three day HIV reporting workshop for producers and people living with HIV and Aids (PLWHA).
The goal is for the five training managers from the first workshop to lead the second workshop.  This workshop in Nasarawa will be the first of eight different states the team will reach as part of the ENR project – the next stop is Cross River state.
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14 January, 2010
Growing pains
Posted by worldservicetrust under Enhancing Nigeria's Response to HIV and Aids | Tags: abuja, africa, bbc world service trust, communication​, HIV/AIDS​, journalism​, Lagos, local media, media training, nigeria, tv |
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Enhancing Nigeria’s Response to HIV and Aids (ENR) is the BBC World Service Trust’s new Pan-Nigerian, DFID-funded project which will focus on lowering the prevalence of HIV in the country.
An aspect of this is to help capacity building at national and state TV stations. This involves creating a TV training team which will then go out and provide training at local stations, including training on HIV reporting and co-producing with the station for several weeks.
Ambika Samarthya, an international trainer based in Abuja reports on the first stages of the three year project.
* * *
In the last few months, the ENR TV training team has quickly become invested in the project. But, just as in any relationship, the more you put on the line, the quicker you are to get emotional.
I realised this when the team and I went to Nassarawa state to observe a focus group put together by the BBC WST Research team to gather feedback on our television pilot templates​. The audience reacted enthusiastically to the programmes, and appeared to learn a lot as well as enjoy the shows. I was particularly flattered because they compared Swagger to Wetin Dey, a hugely popular WST Nigeria production dealing with issues of HIV and AIDS.
However Nasiru (one of the trainers) did not seem as thrilled with the feedback as I was.
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9 December, 2009
Things that matter
Posted by worldservicetrust under Enhancing Nigeria's Response to HIV and Aids | Tags: abuja, africa, bbc world service trust, communication​, development​, documentary​, film, HIV/AIDS​, human rights, journalism​, local media, media training, nigeria, tv |
Leave a Comment 
Enhancing Nigeria’s Response to HIV and Aids (ENR) is the BBC World Service Trust’s new Pan-Nigerian, DFID-funded project which will focus on lowering the prevalence of HIV in the country.
An aspect of this is to help capacity building at national and state TV stations. This involves creating a TV training team which will then go out and provide training at local stations, including training on HIV reporting and co-producing with the station for several weeks.
Ambika Samarthya, an international trainer based in Abuja reports on the first stages of the three year project.
* * *
After the feedback we received from the research and internal reviews of our two original TV pilots, I began training Devaan and Nasiru in the techniques and styles of documentary TV production.
Documentary TV is not necessarily news, but real-life stories told through people who are not actors: character-driven, real life narratives. It is not only the direction where our templates were headed, but what audiences globally have been leaning towards.
I explained to them the two necessities of this style of production: interesting stories and engaging characters. I then asked them both to choose a topic they were deeply invested in and to find a story and character with whom they would shoot an interview with.
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