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An International Criminal Court prosecutor opened a war-crimes investigation into North Korea's recent military strikes.
Ashish Kumar Sen
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BOOK REVIEW: When loyalists shunned rebels
By Joseph C. Goulden - The Washington Times
As a lad growing udeductsp near Dan- bury, Conn., Tom Allen heard local legends about the "Tories," Americans who sided with the king in the American Revolution, but "I had not paid them much attention, believing that, as a small minority, they had not played a major role in the war." Published 6:24 p.m. December 6, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: Looking back on life, medicine
By Jeremy Lott - The Washington Times
"Just Like Someone Without Mental Illness Only More So" is Dr. Mark Vonnegut's second stab at a memoir. The first one, "The Eden Express," told the story of how he went crazy in the 1970s. It was a commercial and critical hit but also a professional embarrassment. Published 5:48 p.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'Sarah Berhnhardt'
By Marion Elizabeth Rodgers - The Washington Times
''There are five kinds of actresses," wrote Mark Twain. "Bad actresses, fair actresses, good actresses, great actresses - and then there is Sarah Bernhardt." Among those who agreed were Sigmund Freud, D.H. Lawrence, Willa Cather, Lytton Stratchey. Her romances were famous; lovers included Napolean III, Edward the Prince of Wales and Victor Hugo. Published 8:45 a.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'My Nigeria'
By Martin Rubin - The Washington Times
Large, strategically placed Nigeria should have been the jewel in Britain's African empire, but somehow it ended up being its awkward orphan. British East Africa was both more glamorous - remember the scandalous White Highlands of Kenya - and more economically important with its profitable crops of coffee and sisal and groundnuts so important to the mother country's postwar economy. Published 8:45 a.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'Churchill at Sunset'
By Martin Sieff - The Washington Times
Winston Churchill's last decade of active life, from age 70 to age 80, has been generally ignored or passed over - supposedly tactfully, by his many admirers. The conventional wisdom is that the Grand Old Man stayed in the political arena far too long, indulged in Victorian-era, grandiose daydreams and that he was far out of touch with the realities of a new nuclear world, where Britain was dwarfed by the competing superpowers. Published 8:45 a.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'The Alchemist'
By Mark Hensch - The Washington Times
Comics are the new canvas. Their panels offer artists a clean slate for sharpening their illustrations and then segmenting them so they achieve maximum flow for readers' eyes. They offer the stasis of a painting and the pacing of a movie. Most important, comics are bursting with creativity. Comics illustrators can cast the net so widely they often land in wildly different universes. Published 8:45 a.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'The Planet in a Pebble'
By Anthony J. Sadar - The Washington Times
Wonderment about the origin of Earth's basic material is satisfied with clarity and conversational prose in "The Planet in a Pebble: A Journey Into Earth's Deep History" by Jan Zalasiewicz. This book is a concise, articulate overview of the basic and dynamic field of geology, especially ancient or "paleo-"geology. Published 8:45 a.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
RECENT ARTICLES
BOOK REVIEW: When loyalists shunned rebels
By Joseph C. Goulden - The Washington Times
As a lad growing udeductsp near Dan- bury, Conn., Tom Allen heard local legends about the "Tories," Americans who sided with the king in the American Revolution, but "I had not paid them much attention, believing that, as a small minority, they had not played a major role in the war." Published 6:24 p.m. December 6, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: Looking back on life, medicine
By Jeremy Lott - The Washington Times
"Just Like Someone Without Mental Illness Only More So" is Dr. Mark Vonnegut's second stab at a memoir. The first one, "The Eden Express," told the story of how he went crazy in the 1970s. It was a commercial and critical hit but also a professional embarrassment. Published 5:48 p.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'Sarah Berhnhardt'
By Marion Elizabeth Rodgers - The Washington Times
''There are five kinds of actresses," wrote Mark Twain. "Bad actresses, fair actresses, good actresses, great actresses - and then there is Sarah Bernhardt." Among those who agreed were Sigmund Freud, D.H. Lawrence, Willa Cather, Lytton Stratchey. Her romances were famous; lovers included Napolean III, Edward the Prince of Wales and Victor Hugo. Published 8:45 a.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'My Nigeria'
By Martin Rubin - The Washington Times
Large, strategically placed Nigeria should have been the jewel in Britain's African empire, but somehow it ended up being its awkward orphan. British East Africa was both more glamorous - remember the scandalous White Highlands of Kenya - and more economically important with its profitable crops of coffee and sisal and groundnuts so important to the mother country's postwar economy. Published 8:45 a.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'Churchill at Sunset'
By Martin Sieff - The Washington Times
Winston Churchill's last decade of active life, from age 70 to age 80, has been generally ignored or passed over - supposedly tactfully, by his many admirers. The conventional wisdom is that the Grand Old Man stayed in the political arena far too long, indulged in Victorian-era, grandiose daydreams and that he was far out of touch with the realities of a new nuclear world, where Britain was dwarfed by the competing superpowers. Published 8:45 a.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'The Alchemist'
By Mark Hensch - The Washington Times
Comics are the new canvas. Their panels offer artists a clean slate for sharpening their illustrations and then segmenting them so they achieve maximum flow for readers' eyes. They offer the stasis of a painting and the pacing of a movie. Most important, comics are bursting with creativity. Comics illustrators can cast the net so widely they often land in wildly different universes. Published 8:45 a.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'The Planet in a Pebble'
By Anthony J. Sadar - The Washington Times
Wonderment about the origin of Earth's basic material is satisfied with clarity and conversational prose in "The Planet in a Pebble: A Journey Into Earth's Deep History" by Jan Zalasiewicz. This book is a concise, articulate overview of the basic and dynamic field of geology, especially ancient or "paleo-"geology. Published 8:45 a.m. December 3, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: Tracking creativity in business
By Martin Sieff - The Washington Times
In recent decades, the U.S. publishing industry has unleashed a tidal wave of books about creativity in science and business, and almost all of them have been like fake Viagra: The more the subject is discussed, explored and celebrated, the less impressive are the results in the real world. Published 5:14 p.m. December 1, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: How Polish airmen succeeded
By Robert F. Dunn - The Washington Times
This is a story not previously available in English about Polish airmen in England at the time of the Battle of Britain. It's a story well known by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and those in England at the time who were literally saved from German invasion by them, but now mainly lost in the more popular histories of World War II. Published 5:59 p.m. November 30, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: A mighty ocean's life story
By Gary Anderson - The Washington Times
Do oceans have biographies? One does now, thanks to Simon Winchester's new book, "The Atlantic." Mr. Winchester contends that the Atlantic Ocean is similar to living things in that it has had a birth and eventually will have an end. Both are described, as well as what has happened in between thus far. Published 5:42 p.m. November 29, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: Interpreting the Earhart story
By Priscilla S. Taylor - The Washington Times
From certain camera angles, Amelia Earhart - a tall, slender, blonde who tousled her short hair and wore masculine flying clothes - looked like a feminine version of Charles Lindbergh. It was because of this resemblance that, in 1928, as the first anniversary of Lindbergh's solo flight approached, this likable young social worker who "loved to fly" was plucked from obscurity to be a passenger on another trans-Atlantic flight. Published 2:15 a.m. November 27, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'The Charming Quirks of Others'
By Muriel Dobbin - The Washington Times
The literary odyssey of Alexander McCall Smith now stretches from Botswana to Scotland with a stop in London, and this latest dissection of moral ethics by Isabel Dalhousie in Scotland may make the reader miss the less-pretentious philosophizing of Precious Ramotswe in Africa. Published 7:19 a.m. November 26, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'The Ten Commandments'
By Doug Bandow - The Washington Times
Can anything new be said about the Ten Commandments? They are the essential moral building blocks of Western society. Even most people outside of the Jewish and Christian faiths recognize the importance of the Ten Commandments. Published 7:19 a.m. November 26, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'Talk Show'
By Albin Sadar - The Washington Times
"Cavett had the only smile that came through the valves of video looking wicked and angelic at once." Could any description of Dick Cavett's expression be more spot-on than this by Norman Mailer? And that smile seems to sum up the man in toto. Published 7:19 a.m. November 26, 2010 - Comments
BOOK REVIEW: 'In Motion: The Experience of Travel'
By Claire Hopley - The Washington Times
Tony Hiss begins "In Motion" with a description of walking from his Greenwich Village home to mail a letter and pick up an iced coffee from a bagel shop. Published 7:19 a.m. November 26, 2010 - Comments
HAPPENING NOW
Clinton: Pakistani militants ran group from jail
By Ashish Kumar Sen - The Washington Times
Two leaders of Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) continued to run the Pakistan-based terrorist group's operations while locked up in a Pakistani prison, according to a 2009 diplomatic message by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Published 8:20 p.m. December 7, 2010
Report: Guantanamo Bay transfers return to terrorism
By Bill Gertz - The Washington Times
Nearly one in four terrorists released from the detention facility at U.S. Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, resumed terrorist activities against the United States and the number is expected to rise, according to a report to Congress by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Published 7:46 p.m. December 7, 2010
WikiLeaks founder Assange jailed in LondonTWT  Security
Elizabeth Edwards dies at 61Politics
D.C. Council OKs cuts in budget, furloughsTWT  Local
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