DECJANFEB
06
201020112012
2 captures
06 Jan 2011 - 12 Feb 2011
About this capture
There's a consensus within Israel's Labor Party to leave Netanyahu's coalition if there's no movement in the peace process.
Ben Birnbaum
BOOK REVIEW: Sioux warrior and his times
By Stephen Goode
-
The Washington Times
6:29 p.m., Tuesday, January 4, 2011
Print
Email
View Comment(s)
Enlarge Text|Shrink
SOCIAL NETWORKS
FACEBOOK
TWITTER
QUESTION OF THE DAY
Do you think the Senate should alter its filibuster rules?
Yes
No
Other
Undecided
View results
THE KILLING OF CRAZY HORSE
By Thomas Powers
Knopf, $30, 568 pages, illustrated
Along with the Apache Geronimo and his fellow Sioux Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse is one of those legendary 19th-century Indian warriors whose name everyone recognizes. He has been the subject of two widely read biographies, the 1942 "Crazy Horse" by the great Mari Sandoz and Kingsley Bray's authoritative 2006 book with the same name.
Now Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Thomas Powers takes up "The Killing of Crazy Horse." It's not a biography, though readers will learn a great deal about the man. It's also more than just an investigation into Crazy Horse's Sept. 5, 1877, killing at Fort Robinson in Nebraska after he had surrendered voluntarily to federal officers, though it is that, too, in fascinating detail.
What Mr. Powers offers in this book is a meticulously researched history of the Great Sioux War of the 1870s, whose most famous (but by no means only) battle was Gen. George Armstrong Custer's defeat at Little Bighorn, in which Crazy Horse played a leading and heroic role. In the process of telling the war's story, the author paints a rich portrait of the Sioux and their culture and of life on the American frontier in the 1870s.
The book is packed with hundreds of memorable characters, sharply drawn: Indians, soldiers, officers and their wives, scouts, traders and many others - an incredible mix of life that few books or movies present as well as this book does.
Mr. Powers writes that his interest in Indians "was acquired in the usual way, picked up on the playground in the 1940s and '50s when the game of cowboys and Indians enjoyed a last flowering."
Cowboys he found "dull," while Indians were "mysterious" and "compelling." But he did not act on this interest until 1994, when he and his brother visited the battlefield at Little Bighorn. That visit, coupled with a chance reading of Billy Garnett's account of Crazy Horse's death, led Mr. Powers to want to understand the great chief's killing in detail.
Garnett had been present when Crazy Horse was killed. The illegitimate son of a Confederate Civil War general who died at Gettysburg and a Sioux woman, Garnett worked as an interpreter for federal officers and knew Crazy Horse well.
It was Crazy Horse's killing, Mr. Powers decided, that would be the event onto which he would latch the entire story of the times that he wanted to tell.
"Very often," he explains, "the excavation of an event can reveal the whole of an era, just as an archaeologist's trench through the corner of an ancient city can bring back to light a forgotten civilization."
Story Continues →
‹‹ previous123next ››
© Copyright 2011 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.
COMMENTS
craftyandsly says:
1 day, 4 hours ago
For some reason I cannot get the last two pages (three pages in all) of this book review. Please advise.
View all comment(s) on this article.
MOST READ
RECENT EDITORIALS
EDITORIAL: When Muslims kill Christians
EDITORIAL: Light-bulb banning begins
EDITORIAL: Islam's blasphemy murders
EDITORIAL: Constitutional authority for Congress
EDITORIAL: Obama's breezy hypocrisy
RECENT COMMENTARY
BOOK REVIEW: Mark Twain himself after 100 years
INNIS & FREDERICK: Democrats care, except when they don't
BERMAN: Tycoon resentencing undermines reset with Russia
TYRRELL: Reinforcements are here
KNIGHT: Playing God with Catholic hospitals
RECENT LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
MTV reality show abets abortion
Criticism of Israel hypocritical
Potheads aren't the problem?
Arms for pro-democracy Iranians
Young adults should heed political alarms
All site contents © Copyright 2011 The Washington Times, LLC
About | Customer Service | Terms of Use | Contact Us | Privacy
NEWSOPINIONSPORTSBOOKSCULTUREBLOGSCOMMUNITIES
EDITORIALSCOMMENTARYLETTERSWATER COOLERDECKERKUHNERNUGENTMASTIOBLANKLEY
HOMEOPINIONCOMMENTARY
Edit My ProfileEdit PasswordLogoutLog InE-Mail AlertsSUBSCRIBECLASSIFIEDSE-EDITIONRSS