FEBMARNOV
07
201020112012
11 captures
07 Mar 2011 - 19 Oct 2017
About this capture
TEXT SIZE:
News
Worldwide
Egypt's ElBaradei leads thousands in protest against police
Nadia Abou el Magd
Last Updated: Jun 26, 2010
KHALED DESOUKI / AFP
ALEXANDRIA // Thousands of protesters, led by the Egyptian opposition leader Mohammed ElBaradei, demanded an end to police brutality in this coastal city yesterday in the largest demonstration yet over the killing of a man who witnesses say was beaten to death by undercover police. Mr ElBaradei, the former chief of the nuclear watchdog IAEA, along with his wife and son travelled from Cairo to attend the protest, which was held after Friday prayers at Sidi Gaber Mosque, not far from the internet cafe where Khaled Said, 28, was allegedly beaten to death on June 6.
"The protests are a message from the Egyptian people that they don't accept torture," he told reporters. "I hope the regime gets the message. If they don't there will be a real problem. The writing is on the wall." Mr ElBaradei, who had earlier met Said's family to offer condolences, was mobbed by the 4,000-strong group of protesters who chanted, "Oh, Dr Baradei, we will not leave you, don't leave us or Egypt, Oh, doctor."
This is Mr ElBaradei's first appearance at a street protest since he returned to Egypt in February to become the country's most high-profile reform champion. Mr ElBaradei has toured the country since his return and has been vocal in criticising the policies and practices of the Egyptian government, calling for political and economic reform. The protesters demanded the ouster of Habib el-Adly, the interior minister, who they say has failed to bring to justice those accused of torture.
According to witnesses, Said was killed when plainclothes policemen dragged him out of an internet cafe and beat him to death on a busy Alexandria street. Egypt's interior ministry said he had died from asphyxiation after swallowing a bag of narcotics when approached by officers. But a picture of Said's battered face taken by his elder brother Ahmed has circulated on the internet, sparking an outcry from international rights groups. Said has become a symbol for rights activists against police brutality.
Tens of thousands have joined a group named after Said on Facebook, and thousands have been protesting on an almost daily basis in Alexandria. A second autopsy on Said's body, the results of which were released on Wednesday, confirmed the initial forensic report that he died from swallowing a bag of cannabis. Hassan Mesbah, the owner of the internet cafe where Said was killed, said that "in less than a minute after Khaled entered the cafe, two men attacked him from behind, started banging his head against a marble counter, then took him to the next building and continued to bang his head against the metal gate.
"He was screaming and telling the two men he was dying, but they kept hitting him until he died. The whole thing lasted for 10 to 15 minutes. "Less than 10 minutes later, a police van came and dumped him in the street as if he was a garbage bag, and left," he added. Yesterday's protesters, who were mostly dressed in black, were outnumbered by thousands of anti-riot police. They chanted "long live Egypt" and "God is great" but eventually started chanting against Hosni Mubarak, the president, and Mr el-Adly, demanding the punishment of the perpetrators, and vowed revenge for "Khaled, the martyr of the emergency laws".
Some women were sobbing at the protest, while others held red flowers. Sanaa Wagih, 50, a housewife, said: "I came to this protest because Khaled could have been my brother or my son. Khaled is not an activist, so this could happen to anyone, which was a wake-up call for all of us. If we don't stand up now, they will crush us even more." An anti-riot officer said: "We don't like being here, and surrounding protesters like this, but it's police orders. But I won't beat the protesters. God is above all."
Other prominent leaders of opposition parties and groups attended the protest, including the former presidential candidate Ayman Nour of El-Ghad party and Osama el-Ghazali Harb of the Democratic Front party. Members of the officially banned Muslim Brotherhood also attended. Said died across from the building where he was living with his mother, Laila Marzouq, who said as she sat, dressed in black, in their apartment surrounded by Said's older brother Ahmed, 40, and his sister Zahraa, 30, and other mourners: "I can't explain how I feel.
"But I'm so happy that all these people are standing by my side, as if God sent them to me to tell me that each one of them is my son Khaled, which shows that God is on our side and against the oppressors." @Email:‚Äčnmagd@thenational.ae * With additional reporting by Agence France-Presse
Back to the top
Back to News
Previous article
Court delays Tamim murder retrial verdict
RELATED INFORMATION
Worldwide
Africa
WORLDWIDE
Kate Middleton's family photos online
Robert Gates says US should stay involved in Afghanistan
India's Supreme court approves 'passive euthanasia'
Rebels claim to have seized Ivory Coast town
Sarkozy opens can of worms with call for debate on Islam in France
Oman Air employees strike for higher wages
SOUND & VISION
Get the most from
Sign up to our newsletter
MOST VIEWED
MOST COMMENTED
Most Viewed
What WikiLeaks revealed about Leila Ben Ali's excesses in Tunisia
Safety measures defended after three drown in sea
Hatred against one family brought Tunisia to revolution
Workers stranded without pay
Sarkozy opens can of worms with call for debate on Islam in France
Most Commented
Lawyer warns liquor licensing laws 'apply to all'
Rowdy pupils scare away newly arrived expat teachers
Employers criticise new labour regulations
Ideas for a speed trap you can't evade
Two fined for taking Yas Marina racetrack photos
The National Conversation
Comment
Analysis
Editorial
Letters
Industry Insights
Our journalists
SOUND & VISION
Pictures
Videos
Audio
Inside the National
THE GUIDE
Practical Information
Social Information
History
EVENTS
Upcoming Events
My events
ONLINE FEATURES
E-Paper
Competitions
FROM THE PAPER
The Review
M Magazine
Weekender
MY NATIONAL
Edit preferences
Manage alerts
Do you have a story?
NEWS
UAE news
Courts
Education
Environment
Health
Politics
Science
Technology
Tourism
Transport
Worldwide
Middle East
South Asia
Americas
Europe
Asia Pacific
Africa
BUSINESS
Industry Insights
Aviation
Banking
Economy
Energy
Markets
Media
Property
Retail
Technology
Telecoms
Travel & tourism
SPORT
UAE sport
Football
Formula One
Cricket
Golf
Horse racing
Tennis
Rugby
Motorsport
North American sport
Other sport
LIFESTYLE
Motoring
Travel
House & home
Personal finance
Fashion
Food
Well being
Family
ARTS & CULTURE
Art
Books
Film
Music
On stage

Can't find what you are looking for? Try The National Topics
About us Contact us Work for us Privacy policy Terms and conditions Advertise with us Subscribe Sitemap
NewsUAE newsCourtsEducationEnvironmentHealthPoliticsScienceTechnologyTourismTransportWorldwideMiddle EastSouth AsiaAmericasEuropeAsia PacificAfricaDrivers tried to bribe customs guard, court hearsFour charged in Dh6 million robbery Bank worker charged in Dh500,000 theft attemptHotel workers cleared in food-poisoning deathHelp for labourers fleeing LibyaGulf ministers to debate regional aid packageUAE organisations aid Libyan refugeesSarkozy opens can of worms with call for debate on Islam in FranceSurvivors tell of tragedies at beach that claimed three livesTop research shows need for fundingWhat WikiLeaks revealed about Leila Ben Ali's excesses in TunisiaSafety measures defended after three drown in seaBusinessIndustry InsightsAviationBankingEconomyEnergyMarketsMediaPropertyRetailTechnologyTelecomsTravel & tourismEtisalat rare gainer on subdued UAE stockmarketsDubai leads region as stocks make comebackEtihad swaps out of DreamlinersCruises to bypass Bahrain for seasonBanks forced to change tacticsAgility given good news after US wrangle Bargain hunters lift marketsDeyaar decides again not to pay a dividendBahrain plans hearings into bank failuresClaim over Burj Khalifa to hit Depa's bottom lineEtihad swaps out of DreamlinersEtihad swaps out of DreamlinersMubadala to buy out partnerSportUAE sportFootballFormula OneCricketGolfHorse racingTennisRugbyMotorsportNorth American sportOther sportMisbah: Pakistan must share Afridi's burden Lakers close the gap on SpursPavlyuchenkova defeats Jankovic to retain Monterrey Open titleInspired Inter Milan put five past GenoaKevin Pietersen out of Cricket World CupKarim Benzema has risen to the challenge at Real Madrid Bent loses his scoring boots for once, while Al Habsi gives Silva a helping handRain on Ecclestone's paradeHeavyweight champions David Haye and Wladimir Klitschko to meet in the ringDallas Mavericks happy to stay under the radarUnusual Meireles not out of place at LiverpoolLiverpool expose Man United's leaky defenceLifestyleMotoringTravelHouse & homePersonal financeFashionFoodWell beingFamilyLose that, eat this: sweet and sour chickenA look at the latest skincare technologyParis Fashion Week begins with dazzling detailsTechnophile: Portable computer speakersMotoring news round-upRoad test: The Charger restore its national prideTop 5: failed car companiesSwiss Rolls is electricMy car: Tuning up his carThe Moon Leopard, the first car built in the UAEA look at the latest skincare technologyA look at the latest skincare technologyLose that, eat this: sweet and sour chickenArts & CultureArtBooksFilmMusicOn stageDirector Priyadarshan starts work in Abu DhabiJourney to the pastInterview with author Margaret AtwoodVinyl, the once and future music formatThere's more to watercolours than meets the eyeWelfare concerns raised for child starsInterview with author Marina LewyckaRaed Yassin: Memories are fictionBird Cloud: A Memoir by Annie ProulxTheories of International Politics and ZombiesDirector Priyadarshan starts work in Abu DhabiDirector Priyadarshan starts work in Abu DhabiThe pitfalls of celebrity tweetingNational ConversationCommentAnalysisEditorialLettersIndustry InsightsNews commentSport commentCulture commentLifestyle commentBangladesh cricket fans show dark sideCreate an interest in cricket World Cup qualifiersRain on Ecclestone's paradeSacramento Kings need to move their throne to thriveFrance struggles for hearts and minds over North AfricaInvestment can build a bridge for North AfricaAn urgent need to end teen violenceA vessel of historyThe UAE is home, and yet you don't speak the language?Beijing has bought itself a respite from middle class revoltNew, improved Shoaib Akhtar is good sign for PakistanNew, improved Shoaib Akhtar is good sign for PakistanBangladesh cricket fans show dark side
YOUR OPINIONPOLL RESULTS