FEBMARMAY
07
201020112012
35 captures
07 Mar 2011 - 25 Mar 2021
About this capture
TEXT SIZE:
News
Worldwide
Council says it's Libya's sole representative
Rolla Scolari
Last Updated: Mar 6, 2011
BENGHAZI, Libya // The national council formed by Libya's opposition forces in Benghazi met yesterday for the first time, declaring itself the sole representative of the country.
"The council declares it is the sole representative all over Libya," Mustafa Abdel Jalil, the former justice minister in Col Muammar Qaddafi's government, told a news conference, reading from a prepared statement.
The National Libyan Council met in the city's main courthouse which has become the de facto headquarters of the local opposition. The 30 members were chosen from committees established after Col Qaddafi government's control of the east of the country collapsed.
While the identities of most of the council members are being kept secret for their own safety, Mr Jalil, one of the first high-profile figures to defect from the regime, was appointed committee chairman. Mr Jalil was also the first to announce the formation of a provisional eastern government, on February 27, just a day before the creation of the national council.
Abdelhafiz Ghoka, a Benghazi lawyer, was named the council's spokesman.
Following the meeting yesterday, Mr Jalil and Mr Ghoka said the council was opposed to any foreign military intervention. They also named two representatives in charge of foreign affairs and one in charge of the military.
The council "wants to be a player", said Eman Bugaghis, a spokeswoman for the opposition. "We are expecting the council to find a way to communicate with the outside world. We are also counting on the help of the Libyan diplomats who defected."
Abdulrahman Mohammed Shalgam, Libya's former ambassador to the UN, and Ali Al Awjali, the top Libyan diplomat in Washington, are two of the most prominent regime officials to have sided with the rebels. Rebels in eastern Libya have set up local councils to administer the cities that have fallen to the rebels.
"After the revolution, we found everything destroyed," said Faisal al Safi, an engineer and member of Benghazi's local council. "The regime erased all the infrastructures. We now have to rebuild a civil society and the basis of a state."
Benghazi's local council is divided into sub-committees, which are focusing on different aspects of daily city life: security, health, education, banking, finance, and religion. Mr al Safi is in charge of communication.
"We are looking for an alternative system, in case the old one collapses," he said. "The main switch is in Tripoli, we have to build our own network."
Meanwhile, hundreds of mourners gathered at a cemetery yesterday on the outskirts of the city to bury the dozens who died Friday in a suspicious arms dump explosion that flattened buildings, uprooted trees and torched fire engines
The double blast, which caused devastation for some 500 metres around, killed up to 34 people, according to a doctor's estimate. Mourners blamed the tragedy on Col Qaddafi and vowed that their uprising would succeed. But none of those spoken to were willing to give their full names, fearing reprisals and still terrified of Col Qaddafi.
"There will be rivers of blood. It won't be like in Tunisia and Egypt. How long will the West hold back and do nothing? People are asking why the West is watching without doing anything," said one man in jeans and a leather jacket. "For me, anything that flies overhead, they should shoot it down. Plain and simple," said the businessman, referring to the popular belief that the complex had been attacked from the air.
"We're not quite sure whether it was sabotage, an accident or an air strike, but nobody saw any planes," said Mustafa al Gherieni, a media organizer for the revolutionaries.
The commander of the military engineering headquarters, Maj Wanis Brahim Beleuwila, was inclined to blame sabotage by supporters of Col Qaddafi.
One resident, Mustapha Salah, 30, said the armoury housed explosives and munitions for anti-aircraft guns, rocket-launchers and light automatic weapons in 48 bunkers.
Three huge craters were all that remained of the underground bunkers, while only the foundations of the central structure still stood, along with the smoking wreckage of anti-aircraft batteries protecting the site. "A fire triggered a first explosion, then a second that was much more powerful," Mr Salah said. Next page
Pages:
12One-page article
Back to the top
Back to News
Next article
Rebels meet as battles in Libya intensify
Previous article
Libya fighting flares on several fronts
RELATED INFORMATION
Worldwide
Previous Articles
Libya fighting flares on several fronts
Mar 5th 2011
In North Africa, dream for best, prepare for worst
Mar 5th 2011
Libyan rebels plead for air strikes
Mar 4th 2011
Related Searches
Bahrain protesters prepare demands for Crown Prince
Queen to visit UAE, Oman in November
Wael Ghonim: the voice of a generation
Related Topics
LIBYA UNREST
WORLDWIDE
Iraq in driving seat for GM sales
UN demands access to wounded civilians in Libya
Women united by revolution may be divided by politics
Kate Middleton's family photos online
Robert Gates says US should stay involved in Afghanistan
India's Supreme court approves 'passive euthanasia'
SOUND & VISION
Get the most from
Sign up to our newsletter
MOST VIEWED
MOST COMMENTED
Most Viewed
What WikiLeaks revealed about Leila Ben Ali's excesses in Tunisia
Safety measures defended after three drown in sea
Workers stranded without pay
Hatred against one family brought Tunisia to revolution
Sarkozy opens can of worms with call for debate on Islam in France
Most Commented
Lawyer warns liquor licensing laws 'apply to all'
Rowdy pupils scare away newly arrived expat teachers
Employers criticise new labour regulations
Ideas for a speed trap you can't evade
Two fined for taking Yas Marina racetrack photos
The National Conversation
Comment
Analysis
Editorial
Letters
Industry Insights
Our journalists
SOUND & VISION
Pictures
Videos
Audio
Inside the National
THE GUIDE
Practical Information
Social Information
History
EVENTS
Upcoming Events
My events
ONLINE FEATURES
E-Paper
Competitions
FROM THE PAPER
The Review
M Magazine
Weekender
MY NATIONAL
Edit preferences
Manage alerts
Do you have a story?
NEWS
UAE news
Courts
Education
Environment
Health
Politics
Science
Technology
Tourism
Transport
Worldwide
Middle East
South Asia
Americas
Europe
Asia Pacific
Africa
BUSINESS
Industry Insights
Aviation
Banking
Economy
Energy
Markets
Media
Property
Retail
Technology
Telecoms
Travel & tourism
SPORT
UAE sport
Football
Formula One
Cricket
Golf
Horse racing
Tennis
Rugby
Motorsport
North American sport
Other sport
LIFESTYLE
Motoring
Travel
House & home
Personal finance
Fashion
Food
Well being
Family
ARTS & CULTURE
Art
Books
Film
Music
On stage

Can't find what you are looking for? Try The National Topics
About us Contact us Work for us Privacy policy Terms and conditions Advertise with us Subscribe Sitemap
NewsUAE newsCourtsEducationEnvironmentHealthPoliticsScienceTechnologyTourismTransportWorldwideMiddle EastSouth AsiaAmericasEuropeAsia PacificAfricaKate Middleton's family photos onlineRobert Gates says US should stay involved in AfghanistanIndia's Supreme court approves 'passive euthanasia'Rebels claim to have seized Ivory Coast townDrivers tried to bribe customs guard, court hearsFour charged in Dh6 million robbery Bank worker charged in Dh500,000 theft attemptHotel workers cleared in food-poisoning deathHelp for labourers fleeing LibyaGulf ministers to debate regional aid packageWhat WikiLeaks revealed about Leila Ben Ali's excesses in TunisiaSafety measures defended after three drown in seaBusinessIndustry InsightsAviationBankingEconomyEnergyMarketsMediaPropertyRetailTechnologyTelecomsTravel & tourismQatar leads Mideast gains on banks and industrialsEtihad signs $1.5 billion engine dealEtisalat rare gainer on subdued UAE stockmarketsDubai leads region as stocks make comebackEtihad swaps out of DreamlinersCruises to bypass Bahrain for seasonBanks forced to change tacticsAgility given good news after US wrangle Bargain hunters lift marketsDeyaar decides again not to pay a dividendEtihad swaps out of DreamlinersEtihad swaps out of DreamlinersMubadala to buy out partnerSportUAE sportFootballFormula OneCricketGolfHorse racingTennisRugbyMotorsportNorth American sportOther sportMisbah: Pakistan must share Afridi's burden Lakers close the gap on SpursPavlyuchenkova defeats Jankovic to retain Monterrey Open titleInspired Inter Milan put five past GenoaKevin Pietersen out of Cricket World CupKarim Benzema has risen to the challenge at Real Madrid Bent loses his scoring boots for once, while Al Habsi gives Silva a helping handRain on Ecclestone's paradeHeavyweight champions David Haye and Wladimir Klitschko to meet in the ringDallas Mavericks happy to stay under the radarUnusual Meireles not out of place at LiverpoolNew, improved Shoaib Akhtar is good sign for PakistanLifestyleMotoringTravelHouse & homePersonal financeFashionFoodWell beingFamilyDistinctive trends shine through an eclectic mix at Paris Fashion WeekReport says McQueen designing royal wedding dressAbu Dhabi youngsters learn to run the world in Model UNLose that, eat this: sweet and sour chickenA look at the latest skincare technologyParis Fashion Week begins with dazzling detailsTechnophile: Portable computer speakersMotoring news round-upRoad test: The Charger restore its national prideTop 5: failed car companiesA look at the latest skincare technologyA look at the latest skincare technologyLose that, eat this: sweet and sour chickenArts & CultureArtBooksFilmMusicOn stageThe man who accompanied Guevara on his journey of discovery is deadGet to know the Festival of Literature authors2manydjs to appear at Nasimi Beach's Sandance FestivalDirector Priyadarshan starts work in Abu DhabiJourney to the pastInterview with author Margaret AtwoodVinyl, the once and future music formatThere's more to watercolours than meets the eyeWelfare concerns raised for child starsInterview with author Marina LewyckaDirector Priyadarshan starts work in Abu DhabiDirector Priyadarshan starts work in Abu DhabiThe pitfalls of celebrity tweetingNational ConversationCommentAnalysisEditorialLettersIndustry InsightsNews commentSport commentCulture commentLifestyle commentBangladesh cricket fans show dark sideCreate an interest in cricket World Cup qualifiersRain on Ecclestone's paradeSacramento Kings need to move their throne to thriveFrance struggles for hearts and minds over North AfricaInvestment can build a bridge for North AfricaAn urgent need to end teen violenceA vessel of historyThe UAE is home, and yet you don't speak the language?Beijing has bought itself a respite from middle class revoltNew, improved Shoaib Akhtar is good sign for PakistanNew, improved Shoaib Akhtar is good sign for PakistanThe UAE is home, and yet you don't speak the language?
YOUR OPINIONPOLL RESULTS