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Prosecutors Order Mubarak and Sons Held​Back to Article »
By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK and LIAM STACK
Prosecutors said on Wednesday they had detained former president Hosni Mubarak and his two sons for 15 days to face questioning about corruption and the use of violence against protesters.
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of 2Next
1.
meeho
NYC, NY
April 13th, 2011
11:49 am
I just honestly hope that this is genuine and fair unlike what was happening in Egypt for a long time now!
 Recommend Recommended by 6 Readers

2.
HIGHLIGHT (what's this?)
Beatrice Brusic
New York, N. Y.
April 13th, 2011
11:49 am
Why is Mubarek leaving himself wide open for this? He should have gotten out a long time ago. He's making his last days on earth extremely sad by staying in Egypt. They have turned on him and accused him of being a dictator but he kept them in line, didn't he? They have a lot of fanatics and extremists in that country that need an iron hand. We don't know how democracy is going to work there yet, do we? The man has been punished and humiliated enough. I think it's cruel to continue hounding him now that he's no longer in power.
 Recommend Recommended by 5 Readers

3.
Samia Serageldin
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
April 13th, 2011
11:49 am
The principle of accountability is supremely important as a lesson to would-be dictators, with the caveat that the trials of the Mubarak family be conducted with the fairness, the transparency, the order and the dignity that befits the highest ideals proclaimed by the January 25th revolution.
 Recommend Recommended by 16 Readers

4.
operadog
fb
April 13th, 2011
11:49 am
So see that! There's hope yet to bring our congress to account.
Carl
Portland
 Recommend Recommended by 17 Readers

5.
Dave Kliman
Glen Cove, NY
April 13th, 2011
11:49 am
It would be nice if this were to happen to all other authoritarian dictators around the world, and their corrupt cronies and governments, too.

Good start, world.
 Recommend Recommended by 11 Readers

6.
Abu al-Sous
Chicago
April 13th, 2011
11:59 am
I really wonder what the rulers of Saudi Arabia are thinking, I imagine they're saying: This is really could happen to us too .

I read recently in al-Quds al-Arabi that the Saudi Ruling Family offered to pay tens of billions of dollars if the Egyptian army does not put Mubarak and his son on trial!

I guess they do not want an example!
They don't want this to be a precedent because they know they could be next.

The count down has started.
 Recommend Recommended by 23 Readers

7.
Nikos Retsos
Chicago, IL
April 13th, 2011
12:12 pm
Did really Mubarak have a heat attack when prosecutors started asking him questions on "how he acquired his vast fortune?" Well, new reports surfaced that the hospital manager where Mubarak was taken -after his supposed heart attack- told reporters that Mubarak was well and able to be interviewed by state investigators! I am 99.9% sure that Mubarak pretended he had a cardiac discomfort to avoid answering the prosecutor's questions! And I am sure he had planned to get sick, and he would pretend to get sick in future sessions with investigating magistrates to stall the digging into his financial empire!

For his 30 years in power, Mubarak had been proud of archaeologists constantly digging in Egypt for the Pharaoh's buried fortunes. But now that the persecutors are digging into his own hidden fortunes, he suddenly seem to have a short breath and become unable to answer the questions! He probably feels that since nobody investigated the Pharaohs for corruption during their time, there is no legal precedent in the history of Egypt to investigate an absolute ruler for corruption.

Unfortunately, the Egyptian people have been looted by Pharaohs and kings for 4.000 years. Now the Egyptians want to find out what Mubarak has looted from them during his 30 years of absolute despotic rule! But Mubarak has a pace-maker for a heart arrhythmia, and it seems he has planned to use his condition to "pace himself" out of the interrogation pretending to have a "heart attack." Next time he may pretend to have a "mild stroke," or "memory loss," or claim "executive privilege" - like Richard Nixon during the Watergate scandal. Anything to stall the probe until Allah takes him out of his current misery! After all, he didn't steal for himself - given his age at 82, but for his family. Let's wait and see if the prosecutors will best the archaeologists in the gold digging of the Mubarak family's fortune! Nikos Retsos, retired professor
 Recommend Recommended by 10 Readers

8.
Sudhir
Washington, DC
April 13th, 2011
12:27 pm
Karma Niyama.
 Recommend Recommended by 4 Readers

9.
James Tracey
Virginia
April 13th, 2011
12:46 pm
Make all the billionaire dictators and oligarchs too,who rob their countries,give it all back.
 Recommend Recommended by 7 Readers

10.
ccgasp
Mata de Platano, Costa Rica
April 13th, 2011
12:56 pm
I entirely concur with the comment:

"The principle of accountability is supremely important as a lesson to would-be dictators, with the caveat that the trials of the Mubarak family be conducted with the fairness, the transparency, the order and the dignity that befits the highest ideals proclaimed by the January 25th revolution."

I will add that I wish such an accountability would come-not only to all despots-but especially to those responsible for ours-and the world's-economic crisis... and those in our congress who kow-tow to the 'tea party' and would take us back to the economic inequality of the early twentieth century.
 Recommend Recommended by 8 Readers

11.
Ethan Fenske
Hartland, WI
April 13th, 2011
12:56 pm
He got what was coming to him.
 Recommend Recommended by 3 Readers

12.
Arnie S. Hattzler
Atlanta
April 13th, 2011
1:10 pm
I wonder what a US president would have to do to be similarly detained.
 Recommend Recommended by 4 Readers

13.
Amro
New York, NY
April 13th, 2011
1:24 pm
Egyptian society is full of liberals, moderate and conservatives. It also has few extremists but the mainstream the lead the revolution is capable of winning the battle of ideas against them. Unlike any other revolutions, the Egyptian revolution toppled a dictator in 18 days and then put him and his gang in jail without firing a bullet. In new Egypt we hold people accountable. He ordered the killing of 500 protesters and he must be brought to justice. New Egypt will never be governed by an iron fest again. This is a promise from the Egyptian youth. FULL STOP
 Recommend Recommended by 11 Readers

14.
Newshourjunkie
Chicago
April 13th, 2011
1:41 pm
Its unnecessary to hound him. He was our ally for a very long time (30 years) and continued the peace agreement between Sadat and Begin. Imagine if he was waging war against Israel for 30 years! It would have been a mess for us.
I think a significant number of decent Egyptians will have a feeling of revulsion about this.
They let the Shah of Iran leave, the butcher of Uganda left for Saudi,the dictator of Chile left, etc. So should Mubarak and be left in peace.
If the new heirarchy can't figure out to govern except by hate, they are off to a bad start.
 Recommend Recommended by 4 Readers

15.
HIGHLIGHT (what's this?)
A E ANDERSON
Christchurch, New Zealand
April 13th, 2011
1:42 pm
In his prime, Mr. Mubarak was an effective strongman, and under his leadership tranquility prevailed, and the loonies and extremists were well contained. As Egypt experiments with liberalisation and democracy, only time will tell whether this was better or worse than the society envisgaged by the Tahrir Square protesters. A look a the former Soviet Union, the Balkans, and Iraq suggests there is no single answer for post-authoritarian societies.
 Recommend Recommended by 4 Readers

16.
HIGHLIGHT (what's this?)
Yabaulee
NYC
April 13th, 2011
1:53 pm
@ # Beatrice Brusic
"...They have turned on him and accused him of being a dictator but he kept them in line, didn't he? They have a lot of fanatics and extremists in that country that need an iron hand. We don't know how democracy is going to work there yet, do we?"
!
It's very easy for a guy like you who take all "basic" human dignity rights for granted like: free speech, rule of law, free and fair elections to know, or even imagine, how it feels like living under a military dictator thug for over 30 years.
You never know how it feels when the secret police knockdown your front door and dragged you in the middle of the night to the wonderland? Do you? Or when the ruler two boys enrich themselves with billions looting, embezzling, and peddling influence for money? Or Do you? Or if you’re fellow citizens, living on less than $100/month, dream of just feeding their families. Do you?
!
You mention Egypt "have a lot of fanatics and extremists "...by what standard? I suggest before you label any people, anywhere, to look at your own backyard. There are more fanatics and extremists in the USA more than any place on earth.
!
"he kept them in line, didn't he?" Again, you showing your ignorance and distasteful manners. Egyptians are not a herd (we are not descendant of murderous cowboys). We are from the Pharaohs. A glamorous and wonderful civilization more than 5000 years ago.
!
Finally: what is really galling is the editor of these pages is recommending your vile and distasteful comment.
 Recommend Recommended by 19 Readers

17.
sinna mani
london
April 13th, 2011
3:06 pm
Someone suggests that there are many fanatics in Egypt. No more than anywhere else. I have travelled widely in Egypt. People there are very civilised and hospitable, even members of the much maligned Muslim Brotherhood treated me with great civility. They explained to me the nature of Sharia Law and its application. They had no intention of imposing it on people who did not believe in it including the Christian communities there. PLease visit the country and mix with her people before adopting a holier than thow attitude.
 Recommend Recommended by 7 Readers

18.
dreevesx
San Diego
April 13th, 2011
3:06 pm
The exclamation, (translated from Arabic): "God is great" could be taken as an argument against the proposition that God is not great, or as a shout of praise for the diety -akin to the Christian hosanna.....
 Recommend Recommended by 0 Readers

19.
beethy
CA
April 13th, 2011
3:07 pm
No one should be above the law; Mubarak has been for 3 decades. He and his sons must be able to how did he acquire enormous wealth "on the government salary," and how did his family? Particularly in the light of questions raised.

That investigation should be fair and proper. Regardless of the outcome, I am pleased to see that at least on this matter, the new powers seem to be moving in a democratic way, and hope they set an example for the Arab world that democracy ain't that bad, unless one wants to rule endlessly.
 Recommend Recommended by 2 Readers

20.
Katelyn
Madison, WI
April 13th, 2011
3:42 pm
I personally think that Mubarak should be held accountable for his actions of the past, regardless of whether or not we were allied with him. A previous comment said, "The principle of accountability is supremely important as a lesson to would-be dictators, with the caveat that the trials of the Mubarak family be conducted with the fairness, the transparency, the order and the dignity that befits the highest ideals proclaimed by the January 25th revolution." I agree with this completely. However, it is a shame that the new military leaders also seem to be controlling protesters through violence.
 Recommend Recommended by 2 Readers

21.
TC
DC
April 13th, 2011
3:42 pm
Likely, the new dictatorship's (miitary) response to accusations (well-founded)that they are repressing freedoms, torturing detainees, and killing protestors. Mubarack will probably be executed after a lengthy and confusing trial to deflect attention from the military's dictatorial rule.
 Recommend Recommended by 2 Readers

22.
tewfic el-sawy
new york city
April 13th, 2011
3:43 pm
@Beatrice Brusic: Your misguided comment suggests you harbor a certain philosophical/ideological bias that flies against the ideals of democracy for all human beings. For you freedom and human rights...but others "have to be kept in line" (your words...not mine). This is an offensive ideology which most decent sentient beings will reject. we have fanatics, ideologues, and kooks in our country...would you also suggest Mr Obama keep them in line?

If you -or someone close to you- had been at the receiving end of Mr Mubarak's abuses, your stance would be different.
 Recommend Recommended by 14 Readers

23.
padfoot
Portland, OR
April 13th, 2011
5:35 pm
They can get Mubarak on corruption, but overall he was not particularly violent to protesters. If he was, he'd still be in power like Ghadaffi.
 Recommend Recommended by 2 Readers

24.
SAK
New Jersey
April 13th, 2011
8:17 pm
He should have come to USA. Here no one is punished for looting
the big money. Of course there is severe punishment for crimes involving small amount of money just ask the sisters in Mississippi for getting life imprisonment forthe robbery of $11. Apparantly no one told him how all the bankers got scot free to enjoy their big bonuses. Pharaos may have been looting Egyptians for 4000 years but here the bankers have been doing it for 200 years.We have another 3800 years to go before catching up with the Egyptians.
 Recommend Recommended by 8 Readers

25.
Barry Blitstein
New York City
April 13th, 2011
8:17 pm
None of this would have happened with a reasonable international retirement age for authoritarians holding sole power. I worry that as the retirement age for the rest of us creeps up, more such people with narrowed artery syndrome will cause trouble.
 Recommend Recommended by 0 Readers

of 2Next
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