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Friday, April 15, 2011
Science
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Particle Hunt Nets Almost Nothing; the Hunters Are Almost Thrilled
By DENNIS OVERBYE
Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times
Elena Aprile, right, a Columbia professor, is on a quest for dark matter with a team of graduate and postdoctoral students.
A breathless wait for the first results of an experiment to detect dark matter, and then a verdict: “Spectacular” — no matter that there was very little to see.
Phonetic Clues Hint Language Is Africa-Born
By NICHOLAS WADE
An analysis implies that modern language originated only once, in southern Africa, a surprising finding.
High Costs Linked to Gaps Around Air-Conditioners
By MIREYA NAVARRO
A report estimates that poorly fitted air-conditioners cost buildings in New York City $130 million to $180 million a year in extra fuel consumption.
NASA Chooses Space Shuttles’ Retirement Homes
By KENNETH CHANG
Shuttles that have been carrying astronauts for 30 years were assigned to their final destinations: Florida; Los Angeles; Washington, D.C.; and Manhattan.
Observatory
How to Fend Off an Impostor Egg? Warblers Have Their Ways
By NICHOLAS BAKALAR
The cuckoo finch’s habit of laying its eggs in other birds’ nests provokes a variety of defense mechanisms in three species of warblers in Zambia, researchers say.
U.S. Lagging in Using Technology, Study Shows
By JOHN MARKOFF
For the second consecutive year, the United States finished fifth in the World Economic Forum’s look at computing and communications technology.
Science Times: April 12, 2011
Giants Who Scarfed Down Fast-Food Feasts
By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
Scientists want to know how sauropods thrived for 140 million years, and ate enough to grow so hefty.
Graphic: For a Long Neck, Don’t Chew
Gulf’s Complexity and Resilience Seen in Studies of Oil Spill
By LESLIE KAUFMAN
How the regional ecosystem has responded will keep scientists busy analyzing data for years and help them understand the effects of environmental disasters.
Video: The Science of the Spill
Findings
3-D Avatars Could Put You in Two Places at Once
By JOHN TIERNEY
Conferences with 3-D avatars are nigh, because consumer technology has caught up with the work going on in a pioneering virtual-reality laboratory.
As Mammals Supplanted Dinosaurs, Lice Kept Pace
By NICHOLAS WADE
Lice are expert evolvers, and a new family tree of lice stretches so far back that the host of the first louse would have been a dinosaur.
More Science News
In Japan, Aftershocks Are Also Felt From Within
By ANDREW POLLACK and KEITH BRADSHER
Doctors say people are experiencing phantom quakes as well as other symptoms of “earthquake sickness.”
High Prices Sow Seeds of Erosion
By WILLIAM NEUMAN
The farmland scourge of soil erosion, once on the decline, is again a threat, scientists and environmentalists say.
Congress, in a First, Removes an Animal From the Endangered Species List
By FELICITY BARRINGER and JOHN M. BRODER
Environmental groups said a budget measure dictating that wolves in Montana and Idaho be taken off the list sets an unnerving precedent.
Senators Question Safety of Water Used in Gas Drilling
By ROBBIE BROWN
Democrats and Republicans debate the Environmental Protection Agency’s role in regulating toxic chemicals in the waste created by hydraulic fracking.
Precious Waters
Indians Join Fight for an Oklahoma Lake’s Flow
By FELICITY BARRINGER
A reservoir in southeastern Oklahoma is at the center of a dispute between the Choctaw and Chickasaw tribes and the state over the rights to its water.
Studies Say Natural Gas Has Its Own Environmental Problems
By TOM ZELLER Jr.
Researchers have found that methane from natural gas is leaking in higher quantities than previously thought.
Health News
Group Faults the F.D.A. on Oversight of Devices
By BARRY MEIER
The Government Accountability Office found that the F.D.A. is continuing to approve dozens of high-risk medical devices annually with little review.
Rabbis Sound an Alarm Over Eating Disorders
By RONI CARYN RABIN
Pressure to marry young and be all things to all people contributes to a problem, rabbinic leaders say, and a stigma against mental health problems complicates treatment.
Post a Comment | Health Guide: Anorexia »
More Multimedia
Slide Show: The First Close-Ups of Mercury
NASA’s Messenger spacecraft sent back the first of what is expected to be 75,000 photographs during a yearlong investigation of Mercury.
Slide Show: Up in the Clouds
Some notable selections from “The Cloud Collector’s Handbook” by Gavin Pretor-Pinney, with comments from the author.
Slide Show: Readers’ Photos: A Family’s Best Friend?
Photos and stories of pets that were viewed differently by family members.
Related Article | Special Section: Animals »
Interactive Feature: Rock-Paper-Scissors: You vs. the Computer
Test your strategy against the computer in this rock-paper-scissors game illustrating basic artificial intelligence.
Related Article | Previous Articles in the Series »
Scientist at Work Blog
The Mayan Collapse
By TAKESHI INOMATA
After completing an excavation in Ceibal, Guatemala, archaeologists examine how political, social and environmental problems may have contributed to the Maya collapse.
Tracing Nitrogen's Path Through the Ocean
April 12, 2011
Go to Blog »
ARPA-E Is Poised to Put Products on the Grid
April 14, 2011 3:17 PM ET
Weather Satellites on the Chopping Block
April 14, 2011 2:53 PM ET
When the Devil Is in the Installation Details
April 14, 2011 2:30 PM ET
Go to Blog »
Multimedia
Slide Show
The First Human in Space
On the 50th anniversary of human space flight, a look at Yuri Gagarin and his extraordinary journey.
Science Columns
Observatory
Taking a Second Look at Penguins’ Decline
By NICHOLAS BAKALAR
Rapidly melting sea ice may not be the why the Adélie penguin population in Antarctica has declined by 50 percent in recent years.
Observatory
In Macaques, Familiarity Breeds...More Macaques?
By NICHOLAS BAKALAR
The monkeys seemed to notice a fertility signal in the females they knew, but not in ones they didn’t, scientists find.
Observatory
Bacterium Puts Insect on Evolution Fast Track
By NICHOLAS BAKALAR
The sweet potato whitefly is infected with a bacterium, and both seem to benefit.
More Observatory Columns »
Q & A
When Trees Unfreeze
By C. CLAIBORNE RAY
There are several reasons why snow may melt in rings around trees and shrubs.
More Q & A Columns »
Podcast: Science Times

This week: An environmental scorecard from the Gulf of Mexico; how dinosaurs get their necks; and too old for cancer treatment.
Health Columns
Personal Health
Keeping Eyes on Distracted Driving’s Toll
By JANE E. BRODY
Medical groups are working hard to make patients more aware of distracted driving and its high toll.
More Personal Health Columns »
Really?
Allergies Can Increase the Risk of Depression
By ANAHAD O’CONNOR
A wave of emerging research suggests that seasonal allergies can be psychologically harmful.
Opinion
Dot Earth Blog
Climate, Communication and the 'Nerd Loop'
By ANDREW C. REVKIN
A scientist-turned-filmmaker offers a sermon on the importance of moving from talking about climate change communication to communicating about climate.
More From Dot Earth »
Wordplay Blog
Numberplay: Tracking the Ball
By PRADEEP MUTALIK
Sporting contests sometimes turn on a math problem that referees must solve instantly with only their eyes and brains: projecting where a ball's interrupted flight would have taken it.
Letters
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Science, Environment and Health Series | Special Sections
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  1. Phonetic Clues Hint Language Is Africa-Born
  2. On Science: Particle Hunt Nets Almost Nothing; the Hunters Are Almost Thrilled
  3. High Costs Linked to Gaps Around Air-Conditioners
  4. Scientist at Work: Maya Collapse and Modern Society
  5. Findings: 3-D Avatars Could Put You in Two Places at Once
  6. Green: Weather Satellites on the Chopping Block
  7. Giants Who Scarfed Down Fast-Food Feasts
  8. T.V.A. Considers Improvements for 6 U.S. Nuclear Reactors
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  10. As Mammals Supplanted Dinosaurs, Lice Kept Pace
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Languages Grew From a Seed in Africa, Study Says
Go to Complete List »
  1. Phonetic Clues Hint Language Is Africa-Born
  2. On Science: Particle Hunt Nets Almost Nothing| the Hunters Are Almost Thrilled
  3. High Costs Linked to Gaps Around Air-Conditioners
  4. T.V.A. Considers Improvements for 6 U.S. Nuclear Reactors
  5. Maya Collapse and Modern Society
  6. T.V.A. Agrees to Shutter 18 Generators That Use Coal
  7. NASA Chooses Space Shuttles’ Retirement Homes
  8. Giants Who Scarfed Down Fast-Food Feasts
  9. Findings: 3-D Avatars Could Put You in Two Places at Once
  10. Observatory: How to Fend Off an Impostor Egg? Warblers Have Their Ways
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