SEPOCTNOV
17
201020112012
42 captures
17 Oct 2011 - 11 Feb 2021
About this capture
BBC

Accessibility links
Africa
17 October 2011 Last updated at 12:15 ET
Share this page
Libya conflict: NTC forces claim Bani Walid advance
Video purportedly shot in Bani Walid shows fierce fighting in the town
Continue reading the main story
Libya Crisis
Forces loyal to Libya's interim authorities say they have entered Bani Walid, one of the last towns still loyal to Col Muammar Gaddafi.
NTC military commanders said they met heavy resistance from Gaddafi loyalists in the town, some 170km (110 miles) south-east of the capital, Tripoli.
Meanwhile, fighting is continuing for Col Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte.
And a pro-Gaddafi television station has confirmed reports the ex-leader's son, Khamis, was killed in late August.
Arrai television, based in Syria, said he had died during fighting with National Transitional Council (NTC) forces in the city of Tarhouna, 90km (60 miles) south-east of Tripoli.
Khamis Gaddafi has now been confirmed dead
The son of Col Gaddafi's intelligence chief, Mohammed Abdullah al-Sanussi, was also killed during the battle, Arrai TV said. An earlier report from news agencies suggested that it was the intelligence chief himself who had been killed.
Khamis Gaddafi has been reported dead twice before since the uprising against his father began, only to reappear.
UK Foreign Secretary William Hague has paid a brief visit to the Libyan capital, Tripoli, as part of a wider regional tour of north Africa. His main purpose was to re-open the British embassy and he also met NTC chairman Mustafa Abdul Jalil.
As well as pressing the new authorities on recent allegations of abuse of prisoners in detention, Mr Hague announced a package of support including extra help for demining around the towns of Sirte and Bani Walid, where fighting continues almost two months after the capital fell to anti-Gaddafi forces.
Mr Hague has appointed Sir John Jenkins, formerly the special UK representative to Libya and based in Benghazi for the past few months, as ambassador.
The former embassy building, which was ransacked during the conflict, will take two years to be repaired and made ready for staff to move into.
'Resistance'
Also in the capital, bulldozers have begun to demolish Col Gaddafi's fortress-like Bab al-Aziziya compound.
Interim leaders said it was time "to tear down the symbol of tyranny".
Correspondents say local people have already turned a courtyard, from where Col Gaddafi once made fiery speeches, into a weekly pet market.
Continue reading the main story
In pictures: Bab al-Aziziya demolished
NTC commanders say troops have launched a fresh assault on the desert town of Bani Walid, but the extent of their advance into the desert town remains unclear.
Fighters approached the town on Sunday from the north and south after launching a barrage of artillery fire against the positions of pro-Gaddafi fighters, according to the AFP news agency.
Some 1,500 Gaddafi loyalists are believed to be in the town.
"We attacked this morning from the south-west. Our men were inside the town this afternoon. But there was heavy resistance", NTC commander Jamal Salem told the news agency.
Some reports said the NTC forces had reached the city centre, but these have not been verified.
Last week, troops were pulled back after suffering heavy losses.
Along with Sirte, Bani Walid is one of only two remaining towns in Libya resisting the rule of the NTC.
In Sirte, commanders have been reorganising their forces in an attempt to prevent friendly fire, which some say is slowing their advance.
The BBC's Wyre Davies in Sirte said on Sunday there had been an attempt to co-ordinate the assault with fighters from Misrata in the west told to hold their positions, while troops from Benghazi in the east tried to take ground in the city centre.
However, the situation is chaotic and violent, he adds.
At one point the BBC team in Sirte came under heavy sniper fire and a young Libyan nearby was shot dead as they dived for cover.
'Looting'
As the fighting continues, the NTC is struggling to exert its authority over the country.
There have been reports of widespread looting by fighters around Sirte, with witnesses saying truckloads of stolen goods are being driven away.
Reporters from Associated Press said they saw trucks loaded with everything from tractors and heavy machinery to rugs, freezers, furniture and other household goods being driven off.
More on This Story
Libya Crisis
Features and Analysis
Profiles & Maps
Guides
From other news sites
Share this page
More Africa stories
RSS
Top stories
Features & Analysis
Most Popular
Shared
  1. 1: Man aged 100 completes marathon
  2. 2: Van Gogh 'did not kill himself'
  3. 3: America's child death shame
  4. 4: Power from the people
  5. 5: How did Murakami conquer the world?
Read
  1. 1: Van Gogh 'did not kill himself'
  2. 2: Outcry in China over hit-and-run
  3. 3: Man aged 100 completes marathon
  4. 4: L'Oreal heiress in guardianship
  5. 5: America's child death shame
  6. 6: FBI DNA database plans under fire
  7. 7: Day in pictures: 17 October 2011
  8. 8: Israel families fight Shalit deal
  9. 9: Porn hacker hits Sesame Street
  10. 10: Samsung seeks iPhone 4S sales ban
Video/Audio
  1. 1: Outcry in China over hit-and-run Watch
  2. 2: Dan Wheldon dies in IndyCar race Watch
  3. 3: Runner aged 100 sets world record Watch
  4. 4: Lady Gaga's 'Marilyn moment' Watch
  5. 5: Man on a mission to save oceans Watch
  6. 6: One-third of Thai provinces flooded Watch
  7. 7: One-minute World News Watch
  8. 8: Van Gogh 'did not kill himself' Watch
  9. 9: Occupy London: Why I'm protesting Watch
  10. 10: Fighters wreak revenge on Sirte Watch
Elsewhere on BBC News
People power
How turning the human body into a battery could start a revolution in artificial organs and prosthetics
Programmes
Fast Track Watch
Boeing's Dreamliner is about to make its first commercial flight but will it live up to the hype?
Services
About BBC News
Mobile
Search term:
bbc.co.uk navigation
BBC links
BBC © 2011 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.
This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.