SEPOCTNOV
20
201020112012
13 captures
19 Oct 2011 - 22 Dec 2011
About this capture
Log In|Register

WORLD
Blogs:
Political Hotsheet
Crimesider
Investigates
HealthPop
Celebrity Circuit
Tech Talk
More
Shows:60 OvertimeHotsheet Live
Radio
Mobile
CBS EVENING NEWS
Exotic animals are not your average pets
1 of 9
POLITICAL HOTSHEET
Perry calls for flat tax to replace income tax
2 of 9
U.S.
ICE officer arrested for pot smuggling
3 of 9
October 19, 2011 9:24 AM
PRINT TEXT
Violence erupts amid massive Greece strike
42 Comments
Have Your Say
Email Story
Send to a Friend
Share This
Tell Your Friends
Tweet This
Tweet This
More
Share It
Del.icio.us
Facebook
Stumbleupon
Newsvine
Yahoo bookmarks
Mixx
Digg
Reddit
Google Bookmarks
Twitter
LinkedIn
PLAY CBS NEWS VIDEO
(CBS/AP)  ATHENS, Greece - Hundreds of rioting youths smashed and looted stores in central Athens on Wednesday during a big anti-government rally against painful new austerity measures that erupted into violence.
Outside parliament, demonstrators hurled chunks of marble and gasoline bombs at riot police, who responded with tear gas and stun grenades. Police said at least 14 officers were hospitalized with injuries. At least three journalists covering the demonstrations sustained minor injuries.
Despite the rioting, Greek lawmakers granted initial approval to a new austerity bill whose spending cuts and tax hikes have sparked the fury.
The bill received a 154-141 vote late Wednesday. A second vote on the bill's articles will be held Thursday in the 300-member Parliament. Only after that vote will the bill have passed.
The measures include new tax hikes, further pension and salary cuts, the suspension on reduced pay of 30,000 public servants and the suspension of collective labour contracts.
The violence spread across the city center, as at least 100,000 people marched through the Greek capital on the first day of a two-day general strike that unions described as the largest protest in years.
CBS News correspondent Elizabeth Palmer reports from Athens that the protesters first demonstrated outside parliament in an attempt to stop lawmakers from entering the building for a vote on new austerity measures. The union behind the protests is supported by the communist party
Police and rioters held running battles through the narrow streets of central Athens, as thick black smoke billowed from burning trash and bus-stops.
Wednesday's strike, which grounded flights, disrupted public transport and shut down shops and schools, came before the parliamentary vote late Thursday on new tax increases and spending cuts.
International creditors have demanded the reforms before they give Greece its next infusion of cash. Greece says it will run out of money in a month without the $11 billion bailout money from its partners that use the euro and the International Monetary Fund.
Most of the protesters who converged in central Athens marched peacefully, but crowds outside of parliament clashed with police who tried to disperse them with repeated rounds of tear gas. A gasoline bomb set fire to a presidential guard sentry post at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier outside Parliament, while running clashes broke out in several side streets near the legislature and the capital's main Syntagma Square.
Nearby, groups of hooded, masked protesters tore chunks of marble off building fronts with hammers and crowbars and smashed windows and bank signs. Scuffles also broke out among rioters and demonstrators trying to prevent youths from destroying storefronts and banks along the march route.
Vendors sold swimming goggles to rioters, who used them to ward off the tear gas.
Thousands of people watched the skirmishes, some standing on kiosk roofs to get a better view. Trash was strewn around the streets, and some protesters set clumps of it on fire.
In Greece's second city of Thessaloniki, protesters smashed the facades of about 10 shops that defied the strike and remained open, as well as five banks and cash machines. Police fired tear gas and threw stun grenades.
All sectors — from dentists, hospital doctors and lawyers to shop owners, tax office workers, pharmacists, teachers and dock workers — walked off the job before a parliamentary vote Thursday on new austerity measures which include new taxes and the suspension of tens of thousands of civil servants.
Flights were grounded in the morning but some resumed at noon after air traffic controllers scaled back their strike plan from 48 hours to 12. Dozens of domestic and international flights were still canceled. Ferries remained tied up in port, while public transport workers staged work stoppages but kept buses, trolleys and the Athens subway system running to help protesters.
In Parliament, Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos told lawmakers that Greeks had no choice but to accept the hardship.
"We have to explain to all these indignant people who see their lives changing that what the country is experiencing is not the worst stage of the crisis," he said. "It is an anguished and necessary effort to avoid the ultimate, deepest and harshest level of the crisis. The difference between a difficult situation and a catastrophe is immense."
About 3,000 police deployed in central Athens, shutting down two subway stations near parliament as protest marches began. Protesters banged drums and chanted slogans against the government and Greece's international creditors who have pressured the country to push through rounds of tax hikes and spending cuts.
"We just can't take it any more. There is desperation, anger and bitterness," said Nikos Anastasopoulos, head of a workers' union for an Athens municipality.
Other municipal workers said they had no option but to take to the streets.
"We can't make ends meet for our families," said protester Eleni Voulieri. "We've lost our salaries, we've lost everything and we're in danger of losing our jobs."
Demonstrations during a similar 48-hour strike in June left the center of Athens convulsed by violence as rioters clashed with police on both days while deputies voted on another austerity package inside Parliament.
Piles of garbage festered on Athens street corners despite Tuesday's government order to garbage crews to end their 17-day strike. Earlier in the week, private crews removed some trash from along the planned demonstration routes, but mounds remained on side streets, along some of the march routes and in city neighborhoods.
1 2 Next Page »

© 2011 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
42 Comments
Have Your Say
Email Story
Send to a Friend
Share This
Tell Your Friends
Tweet This
Tweet This
More
Share It
1 2 Next »
See all 42 Comments
by formerusmcsgt1 October 19, 2011 9:36 PM EDT
Piles of garbage festered on Athens street corners despite Tuesday's government order to garbage crews to end their 17-day strike.
---
Should be plenty ripe by now.....
Reply to this comment
by Dreadnut October 19, 2011 4:54 PM EDT
1. recession
2. denial of recession
3. acknowledgement of recession
4. stimulus
5. failure of stimulus
6. denial of failure of stimulus
7. acknowledgement of failure of stimulus
8. bailout requested
9. bailout approved with conditions
10. conditions implemented
11. protests and rioting over conditions implemented
12. default on bailout
13. goto number 8
Reply to this comment
by ddaryl1 October 19, 2011 2:30 PM EDT
Our capitalist markets and government allowed our jobs to be sent over seas to communist China and allows those companies to sell us goods made in communist China.

So what is the problem again ?

http://www.teapartynation.com/profiles/blogs/call-for-a-strike-of-american-small-businesses-against-the

That is the problem
Reply to this comment
by louiville12 October 19, 2011 3:10 PM EDT
China exports jobs to Vietnam so would that be "Our communist markets and governments"
by fxp111 October 19, 2011 1:47 PM EDT
The Greek people were sold a bill of goods by their politicians. Didn't anyone explain that they were eventually going to have to pay the price for living beyond their means? I guess they are now collectively going through the stages of grief this being anger and denial. What about the banks and lending institutions that should have known better and cut off the borrowing spigot much sooner? It seems the World had lost all sense of reality this past decade.
Reply to this comment
by KnowerseekerReturns October 19, 2011 2:02 PM EDT
First, as lay citizens (are you one?), do any of us in any country really know how our government keeps their books? Second, yes, you hit upon something: Those who hold sway over the world -- whether government entities or private -- should have a responsibility to do their best to keep the world thriving. Once upon a time, such men (and women) believed that. This wouldn't have happened if Greek politicians believed in being responsible.
by askagain October 20, 2011 12:41 AM EDT
The people themselves share some of the blame. Demanding too much of the government and society certainly helped shape Greece's economic problems. The government may have overestimated its ability to provide too many benefits. At any rate, Greece is at the mercy of other European governments. They will not bailout Greece unless Greece offers a way to curb its spending.
by Brokennews October 19, 2011 12:46 PM EDT
SPARTANS!! What is your profession!!??




"Gee, I don't really have one!"

"Yeah! I haven't worked in years!"

"Profession???........Is that like a job?"

"Couch crushing! Does that count?"

"Competitive sleeper!!"
Reply to this comment
by Danize October 19, 2011 1:37 PM EDT
What a f=-+*&ing moron you are...
by KnowerseekerReturns October 19, 2011 1:40 PM EDT
Dumbazz, didn't you read the article?

"The measures to be voted on come after more than a year and a half of repeated spending cuts and tax increases. They include new tax hikes, further pension and salary cuts, the suspension on reduced pay of 30,000 public servants and the suspension of collective labor contracts."
by jaxsterling October 19, 2011 11:10 AM EDT
The Communist, Marxist, Socialist, Hippies, Lazy, Unions, ect....they are now embolden when you have a leader of the free World who subscribes to these groups and was once and still is a Leftist Radical....the world burns. Time to clean out all Communist in the United States. Starting with the Occupiers. They should all be in Jail, breaking laws and not getting permits. Why are some groups allowed to follow laws and others arent.
Reply to this comment
by nikoskay October 19, 2011 1:05 PM EDT
Wonder who shoved a bug up your capitalist a$$??
by TellitTrue October 19, 2011 1:09 PM EDT
@nikoskay, wonder why you're so interested in his a$$??
See all 5 Replies
by johnpatrick1 October 19, 2011 11:09 AM EDT
Capitalistic excees....we shall see the same very soon in the streets of the Citadel of Corrupt Capitalism....AMERICA...GET READY.
Reply to this comment
by vsmit October 19, 2011 11:37 AM EDT
You are looking at a preview of the USA after 8 years of Obama.

GET READY!!
by KnowerseekerReturns October 19, 2011 1:42 PM EDT
vsmit, more like 16 years + (Bush and Obama + Clinton) of off-shoring jobs and the fat cats getting fatter.
by Brokennews October 19, 2011 10:56 AM EDT
Greece just needs some corporate sponsorship!

Like a Football stadium!



"Greece, brought to you by Proctor & Gamble!"

Or

"Kraft Foods presents Greece, the Cheesy Country!"
Reply to this comment
by Goofer-Buddy October 19, 2011 11:10 AM EDT
I thought they had a Stadium.....
by KnowerseekerReturns October 19, 2011 1:43 PM EDT
You know, I can't tell if you're in favor of corporate rulership or against.
by dynamited777 October 19, 2011 10:49 AM EDT
Gotta love the reporters attempt to discredit the demands of the people by labeling them communists. This is what happens when fascist highjack a democracy and begin to extract the wealth of the people the chosen few. People thought with the fall of the USSR there would be no revolutions in 'stable' democracies, think again. The rating agencies are downgrading bonds in our depression in order to extract one or two percentage points above the deflationary rate of 0% set by central banks to continue the cash flow to the 1%. If you don't know what comes next, check out the story line from 1933.
Reply to this comment
by vsmit October 19, 2011 11:39 AM EDT
The "demands of the people" is what got Greece in this mess. They don't want to pay taxes (sounds like us in the USA), they want government jobs, health care and education (sounds like the USA) and they expect the gravy train to go on forever (sounds like the USA).
by TellitTrue October 19, 2011 1:06 PM EDT
Gotta love the brain-dead people who watch socialism fail again and again, only to continue to insist the U.S. go down the same path. Greece is bankrupt BECAUSE they gave in to the "demands of the people." While their country circles the drain and its leadership desperately tries to avoid total collapse, the spoiled union workers take to the streets to protest any attempt to reduce their benefits. A few more years of Obama, and we'll be there.
by rational_1 October 19, 2011 10:49 AM EDT
Typical lefties probably expected the government to subsidize the cost of the gasoline for their gasoline bombs. Poor silly Greek socialists upset that the Germans are no longer willing to subsidize their nanny state.
Reply to this comment
by KnowerseekerReturns October 19, 2011 1:48 PM EDT
Whether it's little or much, *people* just want a fair share of the pie. Hard work, regardless of field, should be what counts, not "you gotta have money to make money". No aristocrats!
by ddaryl1 October 19, 2011 2:28 PM EDT
lets see our capitalist markets and government allowed our jobs to be sent over seas to communist China and allows those companies to sell us goods made in communist China.

So what is the problem again ?
1 2 Next »
See all 42 Comments
Log in or create an account to post a comment.
SUBMIT
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. By using this Web site you agree to accept our Terms of Service. Click here to read the Rules of Engagement.
Del.icio.us
Facebook
Stumbleupon
Newsvine
Yahoo bookmarks
Mixx
Digg
Reddit
Google Bookmarks
Twitter
LinkedIn
Popular Now in World
32 PHOTOS
Bhutan prepares for a royal wedding
11 PHOTOS
Day in pictures
25 PHOTOS
In Royal Circles
After toddler is left to die, China disquieted
GRAPHIC VIDEO: Chinese girl hit by truck, ignored by passers-by
Schalit free in Israel-Palestinian prisoner swap
Austrian women allege mass rapes at foster home
Rare Viking burial site found in Scotland
Israelis 'shocked' at Egypt TV Schalit interview
Violence erupts amid massive Greece strike
23 women convicted of child pornography in Sweden
Cockpit error sent 737 into Pacific nose dive
Netanyahu issues warning to freed Palestinians
Pakistan U.N. Ambassador: Don't scapegoat us
Libyans close to total victory over Gadhafi forces
Backpack drone a "magic bullet" for U.S. troops?
No letup as Thai authorities battle against flood
NATO "very close" to ending Libya bombing
South Pole evacuee undergoes medical tests
Iceland volcano threatens ash cloud sequel
Latest CBS News Headlines
Terror threat closes UK embassy in Kuwait
NATO kills 115 militants in east Afghanistan fight
Philippines won't retaliate against rebel attack
Government rests case in courthouse takeover trial
Popular CBS News Stories
on Facebook
After toddler is left to die, China disquieted
Sheriff: Missing Ohio monkey believed eaten
Ohio sheriff: Only one monkey remains missing
Some sales from Bieber's new CD to go to charity
Dangerous animals escape Ohio preserve
Most Discussed Stories
on CBS News
Ohio sheriff: Only one monkey remains missing
Police: 3 exotic animals still loose in Ohio
Sheriff: Missing Ohio monkey believed eaten
Shoot to kill: Ohio cops hunt escaped animals
Steve Jobs amassed $6B fortune
Most Popular on CBS News
Stories
More »
01
Sheriff: Missing Ohio monkey believed eaten
02
Amazing video shows quantum levitation in action
03
Ohio sheriff: Only one monkey remains missing
04
Medicare costs to offset Social Security hike
05
Dangerous animals escape Ohio preserve
Videos
More »
01
GRAPHIC VIDEO: Chinese girl hit by truck, ignored by passers-by
02
Redemption song
03
Evening News Online, 10.19.11
12345
More »
CBS News on Facebook

Copyright © 2011 CBS Interactive Inc. All rights reserved.


CBSNews.com
Site Map
Video Site Map
Mobile/WAP Site
Help
Contact Us
CBS Bios
Careers
Internships
Development Programs
Topics
China
United Nations
Social Security
North Korea
Terrorism
Capital Punishment
Immigration
Gay Marriage
Disaster in Japan
Foreclosures
Debt Crisis
Massacre in Norway
Election 2012
Marijuana
Rupert Murdoch
9/11: Ten Years Later
Follow Us
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Email Newsletters
YouTube
CBS Mobile
CBS News Mobile
CBS News for Android
The CBS News app for Android smartphones offers breaking headlines and video as well as the latest from The Early Show, 60 Minutes and more.
Learn more...
Visit other CBS Interactive sites:
Privacy Policy
Terms of Use
Mobile User Agreement
About CBS
Advertise
CBSNEWS.COMCBS EVENING NEWSTHE EARLY SHOW48 HOURS60 MINUTESSUNDAY MORNINGFACE THE NATIONUP TO THE MINUTE
VIDEOU.S.WORLDPOLITICSENTERTAINMENTHEALTHWATCHMONEYWATCHTECHSPORTSOPINIONPHOTOSPopularStrange NewsRecipesBlogsPuzzlesCBS News on TwitterNewslettersPodcastsWidgetsCBS News Bios
.Sheriff: Missing Ohio monkey believed eaten
.Reports: French first lady gives birth to girl
.Mo. senator lost 50 pounds with Twitter's help
.Obama: I married Michelle to help my gene pool
.Halloween costumes in a flash
.Judge revokes Lindsay Lohan's probation
12 PHOTOSView Gallery ».20 PHOTOSView Gallery ».10 PHOTOSView Gallery ».20 PHOTOSView Gallery ».11 PHOTOSView Gallery ».