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February 15, 2012
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EGYPT ELECTIONS: REFORM AND DEVELOPMENT PARTY
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

The Reform and Development Party falls on the liberal side of the spectrum. Starting as a splinter from the Democratic Front in 2009, it was not allowed to register officially until May 2011, but remained active in the interim. The party has so far remained aloof concerning alliances, joining neither the Democratic Alliance nor the Egypt Bloc.

The Reform and Development Party, a relative newcomer to Egypt’s political scene, was launched in January 2009 by Anwar Tal’at Esma’t Sadat, a nephew of former President Anwar Sadat, after he defected from the Democratic Front Party. The Political Parties Committee rejected his application for legal status in July 2010. Rather than appealing the decision, Sadat started lobbying for a complete overhaul of the committee’s structure to prevent it from functioning as an instrument of the National Democratic Party (NDP) and custodian of the regime’s interests. The party was legalized on May 21, 2011 after the 2011 uprising. In June 2011, the Reform and Development Party merged with the Our Egypt party led by Ramy Lakkah, and Lakkah became the party’s new president.
Political Issues:
- Fostering unity among Egyptians and encouraging the engagement of all citizens in the political process
- Creating an independent supervisory committee to ensure free and fair elections
- Establishing oversight mechanisms to monitor corruption in governing institutions
- Establishing a clear separation between the religious and political realms
Socio-economic Issues:
- Promoting economic development through free-market policies
- Increasing the economic opportunities available to all citizens, while alleviating poverty and injustice
- Supporting small-scale development projects and microfinance initiatives that benefit local communities
Foreign Policy Issues:
- Opposing the normalization of diplomatic and economic relations with Israel
Major Party Figures:
Ramy Lakkah: President
Anwar Tal’at Esma’t Sadat: Vice President
Website:
http://www.rdpegypt.org/
http://www.facebook.com/rdpegypt (Facebook)
From Guide to Egypt’s Transition, Carnegie Endowment for International Peacehttp://egyptelections.carnegieendowment.org/2010/09/16/the-reform-and-development-party

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing cooperation between nations and promoting active international engagement by the United States. Founded in 1910, its work is nonpartisan and dedicated to achieving practical results.

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