38 captures
17 Feb 2011 - 03 Sep 2020
About this capture
 
Home
Business
Business Home
Technology
Economy
Media
Business Traveller
DealZone
Entrepreneurial
World
World Home
US
India Insight
FaithWorld
World Video
Reuters Investigates
Decoder
Euro Zone
China
Japan
Russia
UK
Tech
Technology Home
MediaFile
Science
Tech Video
Tech Tonic
Money
Money Home
Analyst Research
Alerts
Watchlist
Portfolio
Stock Screener
Fund Screener
Mark Miller
Linda Stern
John Wasik
James Saft
Personal Finance Video
Money Clip
Investing 201
Opinion
Opinion Home
Chrystia Freeland
Felix Salmon
David Rohde
Bernd Debusmann
Nader Mousavizadeh
David Cay Johnston
Bethany McLean
Edward Hadas
Hugo Dixon
Ian Bremmer
Mohamed El-Erian
Lawrence Summers
Susan Glasser
The Great Debate
Geraldine Fabrikant
Jack & Suzy Welch
Breakingviews
Equities
Credit
Private Equity
M&A;
Macro & Markets
Politics
Breakingviews Video
Sports
Football
Cricket
Rugby
Formula One
Tennis
Golf
Olympics
Left Field
Life
Lifestyle Home
Health
Arts
Entertainment
Oddly Enough
Lifestyle Video
Pictures
Pictures Home
Reuters Photographers
Full Focus
Video
Reuters TV
Reuters News
ARTICLE
SLIDESHOW
Follow Reuters
READ
  1. Family, fans, stars to mourn Whitney Houston |
    1:22pm GMT
  2. Greek cabinet tackles austerity, rescue hopes rise |
    1:20pm GMT
  3. Italian police seize $6 trillion of fake U.S. bonds |
    17 Feb 2012
  4. Syrian forces fire on anti-Assad crowd in capital |
    2:22pm GMT
  5. Student jailed for "extensive" Facebook hack
    17 Feb 2012
DISCUSSED
17
Greek lawmakers pass austerity bill as Athens burns
9
Greek leaders blow chance of quick E.U. bailout approval
5
Hopes rise for Greek deal, but anger grows in euro zone
WATCHED
Bomb-proof bins for London streets Thu, Feb 16 2012
Guards mystery in Greek art theft5:14am GMT
Dutch prince buried in avalanche, condition critical Fri, Feb 17 2012
Protester killed in Bahrain "Day of Rage" - witnesses
Tweet
Link this
Share this
Email
Print
RELATED NEWS
Yemeni police block protesters' march on palace
Sun, Feb 13 2011
Yemeni police block protesters' march on palace
Sun, Feb 13 2011
Analysis - Bahrain protests to add to pressure on government
Sun, Feb 13 2011
Analysis: Bahrain protests to add to pressure on government
Sun, Feb 13 2011
Egypt military rulers under pressure from protesters
Sat, Feb 12 2011
RELATED TOPICS
World »
Egypt »
Bahrain »
1 of 4. Bahrain youths demonstrate in front of the police in Manama, February 14, 2011. S
Credit: Reuters/Hamad I Mohammed
By Frederik Richter
MANAMA | Mon Feb 14, 2011 7:07pm GMT
MANAMA (Reuters) - Police in Bahrain fired teargas and rubber bullets to break up pro-reform demonstrations on Monday and one protester was killed, witnesses said, in a "Day of Rage" stimulated by popular upheaval in Egypt and Tunisia.
Helicopters circled over the Gulf Arab state's capital Manama, where protesters had been due to gather but which remained quiet as security forces patrolled Shi'ite areas. More than 20 people were hurt, one of them critically, in clashes in Shi'ite villages that ring the capital, witnesses said.
Bahrain, where a Sunni Muslim family rules over a Shi'ite majority, offered cash payouts in the run-up to the protest, a move apparently designed to prevent Shi'ite discontent from boiling over as "people power" revolts spread in the Arab world.
Two witnesses at a Manama hospital said a 22-year-old protester from Daih village died from bullet wounds in his back, and another was in critical condition with a fractured skull.
In the village of Diraz, authorities dispersed with teargas about 100 Shi'ite protesters who had squared off with police, demanding more political rights. Another 10 were injured in Nuweidrat by police firing teargas and rubber bullets at protesters calling for the release of Shi'ite detainees.
"There were 2,000 sitting in the street voicing their demands when police started firing," 24-year-old Kamel said.
"We don't want to overthrow the ruling family, we just want to have our say," said Ali Jassem, married to a daughter of Sheikh Issa Qassem, a powerful Shi'ite cleric.
Diplomats say Bahrain's demonstrations, organised on Facebook and Twitter, would gauge whether a larger base of Shi'ites can be drawn to the streets.
"We call on all Bahraini people -- men, women, boys and girls -- to share in our rallies in a peaceful and civilised way to guarantee a stable and promising future for ourselves and our children," activists said in a statement on Twitter.
"We would like to stress that February 14 is only the beginning. The road may be long and the rallies may continue for days and weeks, but if a people one day chooses life, then destiny will respond."
Analysts say large-scale unrest in Bahrain could embolden marginalised Shi'ites in nearby Saudi Arabia, the world's biggest oil exporter.
There was no immediate comment from Bahraini authorities.
NEW CONSTITUTION DEMANDED
Protest organisers said they sought a new constitution, to be drawn up a committee including both Sunnis and Shi'ites.
They want an elected prime minister, the release of "all political prisoners," and a probe of torture allegations.
Bahrain is a small oil-producer whose Shi'ite population has long complained of discrimination by the ruling Sunni al-Khalifa family, well before uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt emboldened activists throughout the region.
While tension pervaded Shi'ite villages, in Manama government supporters honked car horns and waved Bahraini flags to celebrate the 10th anniversary of a national charter introduced after unrest in the 1990s.
The cost of insuring Bahrain's 5-year sovereign debt widened by 10 basis points on Monday, according to Markit, in a sign investors were worried about stability.
King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa, trying to take the steam out of protests, said he would give 1,000 dinars (1,650 pounds) to each local family, and the government has indicated that it may free minors arrested under a security crackdown last year.
Non-OPEC Bahrain, which unlike Gulf Arab peers has little spare cash to use for social problems, has also said it would spend an extra $417 million (259 million pounds) on social items, including food subsidies, reversing attempts to prepare the public for cuts.
WORLD
EGYPT
BAHRAIN
Tweet this
Link this
Share this
Digg this
Email
Reprints
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

 
Back to top
Reuters.com
Business
Markets
World
Politics
Technology
Opinion
Money
Pictures
Videos
Site Index
Mobile
Reuters Toolbar
Legal
Bankruptcy Law
California Legal
New York Legal
Securities Law
Support & Contact
Support
Corrections
Advertise With Us
Connect with Reuters
Twitter  
Facebook  
LinkedIn  
RSS  
Newsletters
About
Privacy Policy
Terms of Use
Copyright
Our Flagship financial information platform incorporating Reuters Insider
An ultra-low latency infrastructure for electronic trading and data distribution
A connected approach to governance, risk and compliance
Our next generation legal research platform
Our global tax workstation
Thomsonreuters.com
About Thomson Reuters
Investor Relations
Careers
Contact Us
 
Thomson Reuters is the world's largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news, business news, technology news, headline news, small business news, news alerts, personal finance, stock market, and mutual funds information available on Reuters.com, video, mobile, and interactive television platforms. Thomson Reuters journalists are subject to an Editorial Handbook which requires fair presentation and disclosure of relevant interests.
NYSE and AMEX quotes delayed by at least 20 minutes. Nasdaq delayed by at least 15 minutes. For a complete list of exchanges and delays, please click here.
Financial Regulatory ForumMacroscopeSummitsSummit NotebookBusiness VideoThe Freeland File
MarketsMarkets HomeUK MarketsGlobal Market DataIndicesDealsM&A;QuotesFXpertCurrenciesCommoditiesFundsFundsHubAnalyst Research
FacebookTwitterRSSYouTube