131 captures
20 Apr 2011 - 25 Mar 2021
About this capture
July 24, 2012
ESSAYS
THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT NOW
William B. Quandt
How President Obama can get peacemaking back on track READ MORE
THE STRUGGLE FOR MIDDLE EAST DEMOCRACY
Shadi Hamid
Why the Arab street finally revolted READ MORE
NEGOTIATING PEACE IN SUDAN
Princeton N. Lyman
An American perspective READ MORE
REFLECTIONS ON ARAB RENAISSANCE
Ahmed Zewail
A call for education reformREAD MORE
ARAB SPRING SEEN FROM TEHRAN
Trita Parsi , Reza Marashi
The geopolitical contest for the region’s hearts and minds READ MORE
GOVERNING A WORLD WITH HIV AND AIDS
Alex de Waal
The pandemic is not out of the danger zone, but apocalyptic predictions about the collapse of armies, state crises, and a vicious interaction between HIV/AIDS and violent conflict -- especially in Africa -- have not come to pass. Careful analysis gives far less cause for pessimism than many imagined would be possible even half a decade ago.READ MORE
BRAZIL AND THE MIDDLE EAST
Celso Amorim
President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silvaa made the region a foreign policy focus in pursuit of greater South-South cooperation. An insider’s look at how the Brasília sees Arab democratization, Arab-Israeli peace, the nuclear standoff with Iran and trade and investment promotion.READ MORE
THE CLIMATE CHANGE CHALLENGE
Mostafa K. Tolba
The results of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Cancun proved once again that nations are not serious about addressing the danger posed by global warming. Non-stop consultations between developed and developing countries must achieve tangible and effective compromises before the follow-up conference in Durban in November.READ MORE
GREAT GAMES, LOCAL RULES
Alexander Cooley
The big-power competition in Central Asia is not quite what it seems. More intriguing is how the region’s governments play the U.S., China and Russia off one another for political and economic gain.READ MORE
NELSON MANDELA’S LEGACY
John Carlin
What the world must learn from one of our greatest leaders READ MORE
AN EMERGING NEW WORLD ORDER
Pravin Gordhan
How the rise of developing economies–exemplified by BRICS– is changing the old way of doing business READ MORE
FREE SPEECH IN THE AGE OF TWITTER
Jillian C. York
The microblogging service has become the digital tool of choice for political and social activists. But more important than Twitter’s protest-friendly architecture is the commitment of company executives to uncensored expression.READ MORE
THE REVOLUTION WILL BE TWEETED
Rasha A. Abdulla
There is no doubt that social networking helped bring Egyptians to Tahrir Square for the country’s January 25 revolution. But, equally important, services like Facebook and Twitter also prepared the ground by providing a model of horizontal communication and democratic participation.​READ MORE
EGYPT'S SEARCH FOR TRUTH
Michael Wahid Hanna
The effort to hold the former regime of President Hosni Mubarak to account is off to a poor start. But as the experiences of other nations in transition have shown, establishing a credible record of past abuses is essential to forming a democratic culture.READ MORE
THE ERDOĞAN EFFECT: TURKEY, EGYPT AND THE FUTURE OF THE MIDDLE EAST
Nuh Yilmaz, Kadir Ustun
Turkey has adopted a pro-active foreign policy in support of democracy in the Middle East. Together with a democratic and economically strong Egypt, Turkey can help Arab countries forge an integrated regional order.READ MORE
JOINING HEZBOLLAH
Nicholas Blanford
The militant Lebanese Shia group believes that the psychological makeup of individual fighters, rather than their weapons, is the key to their battlefield triumphs. An inside glimpse at how the Iranian-backed party sustains its war against Israel.READ MORE
AN ONLINE SYMPOSIUM ON TURKISH FOREIGN POLICY
Cairo Review
Reflecting on Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu’s exclusive interview with The Cairo Review of Global Affairs, five leading analysts discuss whether Ankara’s regional approach is meeting the challenges of a Middle East in transformation.​READ MORE
LOSING EGYPT
Steven A. Cook
Washington’s policy of ‘authoritarian stability’ worked for thirty years in the Middle East. Strategic relations with Hosni Mubarak helped enable the U.S. to become the predominant power in the region. But domestic opposition groups used these ties as a cudgel in their struggle against dictatorship. With the fall of Mubarak, future U.S. cooperation with Egypt must overcome a legacy of mistrust. READ MORE
ERDOĞAN'S DECADE
Hugh Pope
Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has changed the political face of Turkey, with significant results to show for it—a booming domestic economy and enhanced international prestige. The jury is still out on whether he has the political will to address shortcomings on Kurdish rights, the Armenian genocide question, the future of Cyprus, and the rule of law, and thus elevate Turkey into a truly global player. READ MORE
THE TURKISH MODEL
Mustafa Akyol
In the past eighty years, Turkish society has not become as secularized as Mustafa Kemal Atatürk envisioned. But rather than choosing a radical or violent path, Turkey’s Islamists have become champions of democracy. This is a lesson in how to be modern and Muslim at the same time. READ MORE
ANKARA LOOKS EAST
Aslı Aydıntaşbaş
After the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, the Turkish Republic oriented itself toward Europe to catch up with 'contemporary civilization.' But in the last ten years, Turkey has sought to play a more active role in the Middle East. The dramatic policy shift now stands to yield substantial strategic, political, and economic dividends following the Arab Spring. READ MORE
EDUCATING TURKS
Ebru İlhan
Turkey’s Justice and Development Party has targeted education reform as a priority—to stimulate economic growth as well as to promote conservative Islamic values. But, so far, the party has not cut loose from the authoritarian Republican legacy within the education system as much Turks had expected.READ MORE
DEMOCRACY'S GROWING PAINS
Ashraf Khalil
As Egyptians prepare to vote in the first presidential election since the end of Hosni Mubarak’s regime, the old aphorism comes to mind: “Every nation has the government it deserves.” Egypt seems to be getting the presidential election it deserves—one reflecting the social and institutional weaknesses that have plagued the country for too long. There is confusion, suspicion, polarization. Conspiracy theories abound. And there is the mounting anxiety over the economy and public security. Increasingly, it seems, nervous citizens are pining for the stability—or at least the predictability—of Mubarak’s three decades in power. READ MORE
KNOWLEDGE WITHOUT BORDERS
Michael M. Crow, William B. Dabars
American research universities are the envy of the world, but they must adapt if they are to create kno wledge that responds to the ‘grand challenges’ of our epoch. Only an amalgamation of transdisciplinary, transinstitutional, and transnational frameworks has the potential to advance broader social and economic outcomes.READ MORE
ENERGY JUSTICE
Clark A. Miller
In the coming fifty years, choices will be made about what kinds of energy systems to build for the future, where to build them, and how to distribute their benefits, costs, and risks. These choices will help determine which countries and communities flourish and which deteriorate. The fight is on. READ MORE
QUEST FOR WATER
Farouk El-Baz
The Middle East is among the driest areas on Earth. Actually, it has plenty of water but much of it lies underground and unexplored. Go vernments in the region must undertake serious efforts to map ground water basins and aquifers and develop regulations for their use.READ MORE
INDIA'S NUCLEAR POWER PROBLEM
Monamie Bhadra
The Indian government launched an ambitious plan to expand atomic energy output seven-fold by the year 2022. But a surprising grassroots movement has sprung up to challenge the program. Rather than focusing on worries about cataclysmic accidents, it is emphasizing citizen rights and government accountability.​READ MORE
DRONE WARS
Michael Burnam-Fink
Meet the Predator, the unmanned attack aircraft that is defining warfare in the post-Cold War era. Initially deemed useless by the Pentagon and Central Intelligence Agency, it has become America’s weapon of choice in the War on Terror. With the creation of a new military bureaucr acy dependent on identifying and striking new enemies, will Predator missions ever end?READ MORE
TO THINK, TO WRITE, TO PUBLISH
Lee Gutkind, David Guston , Gwen Ottinger
Global challenges related to technology demand attention to their social and ethical aspects and not only their tec hnical ones. but Science and Innovation Policy is not easy to get across to the gener al public. A solution: communicating policy through the genre of creative nonfiction.READ MORE
SCIENCE UNDER SIEGE
Matthew Harsh
Political unrest after a disputed presidential election in Kenya left some eleven hundred people dead and three hundred thousand other homeless. But the turmoil also inflicted damage on the country’s knowledge system—the universities and research institutes that generate economic progress and are a key to strengthening democracy against ethnic-based politics.READ MORE
POLICY MAKERS VERSUS PEOPLE
Netra Chhetri , Gary M. Grossman
Conventional wisdom says that the issue of climate change is too complex and technical for ordinary people to grasp but a project called World Wide Views on Global Warming brought together four thousand citizens in thirty-eight countries who demonstrated a keen ability to debate the topic and make policy recommendations​READ MORE
The Decline of American Influence
Big Questions for President Morsi
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