MAYJUNFEB
03
201220132016
13 captures
03 Jun 2013 - 06 Nov 2020
About this capture
Русский
Azərbaycan
English
العربية
فارسی
3 June 2013, 09:26 (GMT+05:00)
Sign up
Login
News
Business
Analysis
Trend Photo
Viewpoint
Trend Terminal
Home
Middle East & Turkey
Arabic region

Muslim Brotherhood vows to ‘flood’ Jordan’s streets to press reform demands
Tweet
5 September 2012, 02:48 (GMT+05:00)
See Also:
Minister: Jordan, Azerbaijan to develop joint project in tourism field
Azerbaijan, Morocco discuss prospects of cultural cooperation
Jordan plans major exercises with 18 countries
Iraq, Jordan to announce tender for oil pipeline construction
Turkey to establish free trade zones in Jordan
Iraq, Jordan to announce tender for oil pipeline construction
Friends of Syria meet in Jordan
Queen Noor of Jordan: Nizami Ganjavi’s writings remain relevant today
E-mail.
Print.
The Jordanian Muslim Brotherhood vowed late Tuesday to "flood" the streets with thousands of protestors in the country's largest ever anti-government rally, warning Amman that it faces its "final chance" to usher in democratic reforms, DPA reported.

In a press statement, the Islamist movement announced that it was planning to hold an anti-government rally this month featuring the participation of at least 50,000 protestors. That would make it the single-largest demonstration in Jordan since the launch of the country's 21-month-old protest movement.

"For months decision-makers have refused to listen to the people's demands, so now we must speak in a louder voice," said Zaki Bani Rsheid, deputy head of the Jordanian Muslim Brotherhood.

The protest threat came as the Islamist movement launched the so-called Higher Council for Reform - a body led by senior Islamist leaders designed to "save" Jordan from economic, social and political crises they claim are "threatening national security."

In its first statement, the nascent council criticised on Tuesday authorities for raising prices of basic commodities and issuing an "undemocratic" elections law, urging Amman to "listen to the people's demands ... before its too late."

The threats come amid rising tensions between Amman and the Muslim Brotherhood - Jordan's largest political force, which is spearheading a nationwide boycott of upcoming parliamentary elections.

The Islamist movement and a majority of Jordanian political forces are urging citizens to forgo the polls, slated to be held in December under an electoral system they claim favours tribal regime loyalists over political parties.

Amman contends that the Brotherhood is pushing to "scale back" the King's constitutional powers, accusing the Islamist movement of seeking to "form a new political regime in Jordan."

A central demand of Jordan's peaceful protest movement, a coalition of Islamists, leftists, independents and tribal activists, is the transfer of the King's constitutional authority to form governments to the people.
Follow @TRENDNewsAgency
MOST READ
Iran presidential candidate Gharazi vows to fight inflation, unemployment
Uzbekistan, Oman discuss bilateral cooperation in economic sphere
Russia to sell 10 MIG-fighter jets to Syria
House of Representatives former member: Azerbaijan, U.S. to continue strengthening bilateral relations (PHOTO)
Georgian interior minister discusses visa regime liberalization with European Commissioners
Can AKP pass "the exam" on Taksim Square?
Ahmadinejad’s brother alerts about Jalili saying he is on the same track with current Iran president
Azerbaijani human rights activist condemns inappropriate use of force against demonstrators in Germany and Turkey
Back to top
About us
Products and services
Follow us
Leadership | Contacts | Company news | Expert Council | Partners
Online access | Business news | Politics | Oil and Gas | Transport | Finances | Analytical | Iran Economy
© 2013 Trend News Agency ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Information of Trend News Agency is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a public offer to buy/sell any securities or make any other investment.
Terms of Use
HomeAzerbaijanSouth CaucasusIranCentral AsiaMiddle East & TurkeyWorld News