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28 May 2011 - 12 Sep 2015
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December 7, 2013
TOPICS
POLITICS & SOCIETY
OLD MEN’S GUNS VS. CIVIL RIGHTS
Rami G. Khouri
We will know in the coming months whether the current “second chance” roadmap to constitutional reform in Egypt achieves that transition to democratic legitimacy that was mismanaged in the two years after the overthrow of the Hosni Mubarak regime. READ MORE
CAIRO: MEGACITY WITHOUT A MAYOR
Cairo Review
Mohamed Elshahed founded Cairobserver, Egypt’s first architecture and urbanism website. He speaks with Senior Editor Jonathan Guyer about the city's grit: which historic areas are at risk, what residents say about their own neighborhoods, and how the government reacts to endemic problems. READ MORE
BEST OF CAIROBSERVER
Cairo Review
Cairobserver is a webzine that leads a conversation about the Egyptian capital. It tells the stories of Cairo’s buildings and builders, residents and municipalities. As part of our Fall 2013 Special Report on the Future of the City, the Cairo Review curates some of the perceptive posts from CairObserver. READ MORE
WHAT EGYPT’S CONSTITUTION MUST ACHIEVE
Seifeldin Fawzy
Egypt’s military-backed roadmap—criticized by some activists and commentators as undemocratic by virtue of its inception following President Mohammed Morsi’s ouster on July 3—is in a crucial phase. The drafting of a new constitution for Egypt has the potential to put the country on the right course. READ MORE
EGYPT’S AL-AZHAR STEPS FORWARD
Ahmed Morsy, Nathan Brown
The downfall of Egypt’s elected Islamist president, Mohamed Morsi, in July 2013 has not resulted in the separation of religion and state in the country. Indeed, something quite different seems to be occurring: religion is being nationalized. READ MORE
EGYPTIANS LOVE THEIR COUNTRY, HATE THEIR GOVERNMENT
Magued Osman
Patriotism is a natural feeling, but can the same be said about the dislike of government?​READ MORE
THE GOOD NEWS OUT OF YEMEN
Nabeel Khoury
Yemen remains the only country to have gone through the Arab Uprisings with neither a descent into civil war nor an abrupt course reversal. The good news is that Yemenis from all factions and regions are still talking; the bad news is that a couple of large bumps on the road need to be dealt with before the political dialogue reaches fruition. READ MORE
KEEPING HOPE ALIVE
Laila El Baradei
At present, what is of major concern to the Egyptian citizen is a need to realize the January 25 demands for better quality of life, freedom, human dignity and social justice. READ MORE
FOREIGN POLICY BEGINS AT HOME: THE CASE FOR PUTTING AMERICA’S HOUSE IN ORDER
Neil Bhatiya
Neil Bhatiya analyzes an overcommitted, underperforming United States READ MORE
WHAT ARABS THINK
Rami G. Khouri
The Writing of a new Middle East narrative.READ MORE
CHONGQING’S CHALLENGE
Tom Miller
A Yangtze River boomtown reveals the dark side of China’s rapid urbanization. The skyline looks like another Hong Kong, with towering modern buildings and soaring bridges, but a closer look reveals worsening social stratification. By focusing on short-term economic gains, Chinese leaders risk creating divided cities with expansive slums and ghettoes of extreme wealth. READ MORE
REIMAGINING DETROIT
John Gallagher
The Motor City, once the world automobile capital, is now better known for urban decay. Public services are abysmal, crime rampant, and leadership absent. But a promising comeback may be in the works, thanks to civic-minded corporate executives, leaders of charitable foundations, and nonprofit neighborhood groups. READ MORE
QUEST FOR A NEW UTOPIA
Anthony M. Townsend
By the year 2100, our cities may be home to eight billion people, 80 percent of the projected global population. Much depends on how we navigate the intersection between urbanization and digital technology. Build the Smart City, but one street corner at a time. READ MORE
THE ARAB HOUSING PARADOX
David Sims
From Cairo to Casablanca and beyond, millions of Arabs live in munatiq ‘ashwa’ia, or random areas. Informal developments continue to expand in response to state failure and incapacity. Arab governments should stop focusing on hyper-modern schemes and start empowering the poor for the creation of formal, legal neighborhoods with affordable housing. READ MORE
MAD CARTOGRAPHERS
Robert Neuwirth
Government bulldozers flattened the Badia East squatter district in Lagos earlier this year. Suppose its nine thousand residents had drawn maps, kept records, and documented their community’s dynamism over the past thirty years. Would it have been quite so easy to evict them? READ MORE
OUR URBAN DREAM
Jaime Lerner
The former mayor of Curitiba says decisive battles for the quality of life are being fought in cities, with the future of the planet at stake. He calls for citizen participation on a global scale to overcome poverty, ignorance and environmental degradation. To innovate, he argues, is to begin. READ MORE
ORIENTAL HALL, ETC.
Cairo Review
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DAMAGE CONTROL
Rozina Ali
A political prisoner freed. An affidavit documenting police abuse. An audience with lawmakers. When Egyptians rose up in 2011, human rights campaigner Heba Morayef dared to hope that such incremental accomplishments were giving way to freedom and democracy. But the dream didn’t last for long. READ MORE
IS U.S. POLICY IN SYRIA CHANGING?
Rami G. Khouri
I was struck a few days ago when I read U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s statement in Riyadh, after talks with the Saudi Arabian leadership, that the United States had neither “the legal authority nor desire” to intervene in Syria.READ MORE
GEZI PARK’S SOCCER FANATICS
Sean David Hobbs
Protests in Gezi Park continue to be a powerful symbol against Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Erdogan’s Justice and Development Party. However, few outside of Turkey know that the “hooligan” soccer fans of Istanbul were instrumental in the first days of the Gezi Park occupation and protest. READ MORE
EGYPT’S LOSE-LOSE MENTALITY
Magued Osman
Will Egypt’s political scene remain as violent and hollow as it is now? Instead of searching for a framework within which both sides can emerge as winners (if only relatively), each faction is striving to ensure that the other loses everything, even at the cost of emerging themselves from the battle empty-handed. READ MORE
ANTIWAR MOVEMENT GRAPPLES WITH SYRIA
Danny Postel
What if progressives devoted just a fraction of the energy and effort that went into mobilizing against a U.S. military strike to the cause of bringing Syria’s nightmare to an end? READ MORE
THE REBIRTH OF SUDAN?
Hamid Eltgani Ali
Sudanese demonstrations, starting in the city of Niyala in Darfur and extending to engulf Wad-Madin and Khartoum, took most observers by surprise. Few countries came out in support of the uprising. This uprising has now become strong enough to be called Sudan’s Revolution. READ MORE
TUNISIA’S POLITICIANS PLAY ON
Fadil Aliriza
Recent headlines have heralded the demise of Tunisia’s governing Islamist party, Ennahda. In fact, this interpretation is misleading. Ennahda and its coalition partners committed to talks and an opposition-defined roadmap which enjoins the current government to resign three weeks from the beginning of discussions. READ MORE
BEAUTY OF THE PLEIADES
Turki Al-Faisal
Arabs have the greatest respect for the faith and culture of Iranians, as well as the indelible Persian contribution to the marvels of Islamic society. But like all worthwhile achievements, Persia’s greatest masterpieces were the product of cooperation and education, of learning from and with people of other backgrounds. READ MORE
THE GENERALS RULE EGYPT AGAIN
Rami G. Khouri
Egypt and its democratic aspirations have been grievously wounded by the swift and severe manner in which the armed forces evicted and jailed Morsi, arrested most of the leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood, killed hundreds of pro-Morsi demonstrators, and then started exerting pressure on the mass media to conform to the generals’ policies. READ MORE
CONTESTED SYRIAN IDENTITIES
Tarek Osman
Syria’s future will not depend on the actors that will dominate specific parts of the country in the medium term. Two other factors are more crucial: how the largest segments of the society will define Syria; and how that social view would affect sectarianism in the country. READ MORE
TUNISIA’S NEGLECTED CONSTITUTION
Robert Joyce
More than two and a half years since the revolution, Tunisia still lacks a new constitution—and no one seems to care. Although many agree on the document’s content, ongoing fights are keeping Tunisia in transition, free of the old regime but not yet able to focus on the reforms the country needs. READ MORE
THE LIMITS OF REFORM IN SAUDI ARABIA
Adam Coogle
The man who heads Saudi Arabia’s infamous religious police made headlines recently when he publicly acknowledged that “Islamic sharia does not have a text forbidding women driving.” For many Saudis, this statement signaled a possible sea change in attitudes among the country’s hard-line religious establishment, at least on that issue. READ MORE
BEYOND NEGOTIATION FETISHISM
Assaf Sharon
Breaking the Israeli-Palestinian impasse requires challenging the exclusivity of direct, bilateral talks. The fetishism of negotiations must be overcome, keeping in mind that negotiations are but a means to an end. READ MORE
CLEAR OPTIONS FOR THE MIDDLE EAST
Rami G. Khouri
It is easy in the Middle East these days to embrace one of the two opposite poles of political sentiments that define the region today—either romantic optimism or a despairing pessimism. As usual, a more accurate and nuanced picture of reality is to be found somewhere between those two extremes. READ MORE
THE COST OF SYRIAN REFUGEES
Nikita Malik
The cost of Syrian refugees is putting a tremendous strain on the Jordanian economy. In addition to increasing resentment within the tribal population, the presence of Syrian refugees has also provided a boost in support for the Muslim Brotherhood, Jordan’s best-organized opposition, thereby adding to the tension the Hashemite Kingdom faces. READ MORE
EGYPT'S CHOICE: CONSTITUTIONALISM OR IMBECILITY
Rami G. Khouri
An Egyptian court’s decision Monday to ban all activities in the country by the Muslim Brotherhood is the kind of foolish act that autocratic governments take when they do not know how to engage in a process of democratic pluralism and seek refuge in their mistaken sense of infallibility. READ MORE
WHAT WILL EGYPT MEAN FOR MOROCCO
Mohammed Masbah
Following the events of July 3 in Egypt, Morocco’s leading Islamist Justice and Development Party risks losing some of the advantages it gained following the constitutional amendment of July 2011—not to mention fears of marginalization within an already hostile political field. READ MORE
NO ALTERNATIVE BUT SUCCESS
Nasser Arrabyee
On Sunday, September 8, members of the Southern Separatist Movement (Hirak) returned to Yemen’s National Dialogue Conference (NDC) following a month-long boycott. Their return—following a series of meetings with Jamal Benomar, the UN Envoy to Yemen, about the possibility of a separate north-south dialogue conference to be held after the NDC and to involve other separatist factions (not all of whom are party to the dialogue)—shows that Yemen’s NDC has overcome its latest hurdle. READ MORE
BIG ISSUES REVOLVE AROUND TEHRAN
Rami G. Khouri
The Moscow-Washington tango that resulted in the Syrian chemical weapons agreement was a first class diplomatic show that will be analyzed by political scientists and pretzel makers for a generation. Every actor in the spectacle claims victory and national strategic benefits, as always occurs in successful diplomacy. READ MORE
WHAT NEXT FOR THE MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD
Abdullah Al-Arian
There is an eerie familiarity to the dire circumstances in which the Muslim Brotherhood currently finds itself. As in the 2011 uprising, the 1952 revolt by the Egyptian military’s Free Officers was supposed to usher in a new era of possibilities for the Egyptian people: independence, economic prosperity, and even representative democracy. READ MORE
DEITIES AND DEFENSE MINISTERS
Rami G. Khouri
Syria is the most dramatic moment of the Middle East today, but it is not the most consequential political development in the region today. That honor would have to go to the current attempt by the interim Egyptian government to ban the Muslim Brotherhood organization and its political party. READ MORE
IS SAUDI ARABIA STABLE?
Sada Debates
Saudi Arabia appears, on the surface, to have escaped the Arab Uprisings untouched. Five experts on Saudi Arabia discuss the kingdom's prospects for maintaining stability. READ MORE
SYRIA SHAKES LEBANON
Nabeel Khoury
It has become a cliché among Levant scholars that Lebanon is a microcosm of the Middle East, and therefore a key to understanding the region. True enough. In Lebanon, the impact of the Syrian war is shaking the very foundation of the Lebanese social contract. READ MORE
OVER THE BRINK
Heiko Wimmen
Geography and history dictate Lebanon’s inevitable entanglement in Syria’s civil war. Yet its own leaders are now pushing the country over the brink; they are gambling with the livelihood and safety of their people—with no regard or empathy. READ MORE
A HARD PROCESS TOWARDS COMMON VALUES DEMOCRACY
Rami G. Khouri
I suspect that what Egypt is experiencing now is not the end of Islamist politics, but the start of its first real test in the public political sphere that is still in the process of being born in Egypt and other Arab countries. READ MORE
TURKEY BEYOND ISLAMISM AND AUTHORITARIANISM
Ziya Meral
As protests spread and grew first in Istanbul, then in other parts of the country, we all struggled to conceptualize what we were witnessing. Many in Turkey opted for clear and neat narratives, which often left out other aspects of the protests and burdened events with legendary meanings ascribed onto them. READ MORE
TWO ISSUES AT STAKE IN SYRIA
Rami G. Khouri
It is quite stunning to experience for the sixth time in a decade a global debate about whether Western powers should use their military superiority to attack Arab countries in order to get those Arab countries to conform to “international norms.” READ MORE
EGYPT'S COPTS, BETWEEN MORSI AND THE MILITARY
Febe Armanios
On July 3, Coptic Pope Tawadros II appeared at a news conference alongside Egypt’s political and religious figure. He spoke briefly in support of President Muhamad Morsi’s ouster. It was the first time a Coptic pope had addressed Egyptians at an explicitly political forum, live on national television. READ MORE
FOUR COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS EGYPTIANS HAVE
Mahmoud Salem
It’s the golden age of rumors in Egypt, especially with the lack of “unbiased” news sources. Add that to the nationalistic wave in the country, misconceptions get viewed as fact. Very few people will attempt to clear those misconceptions without risking to antagonize others, but it is a risk I am willing to take. READ MORE
WHEN POLITICAL CLODS COLLIDE
Rami G. Khouri
Thursday of this week was a bad day in modern Arab history. The four leading Arab cities of recent eras—Baghdad, Damascus, Beirut and Cairo—simultaneously were all engulfed in bombings and urban warfare, mostly carried out with brutal savagery and cruelty against civilians in urban settings. READ MORE
THE TERRIBLE LESSON FROM EGYPT
Akram Belkaïd
It is important for us, as supporters of democratization in the Arab world, to take a stand against what is happening in Egypt. Like it or not, the Muslim Brotherhood is a key player in Egyptian political life. Killing people will not solve any problems, quite the contrary. The bloody assault against the Brotherhood protesters is a shame and a serious crime. READ MORE
BEFORE THE BLOODLETTING: A TOUR OF THE RABAA SIT-IN
Amy Austin Holmes
For the record, not everyone who took the bullets at Rabaa belonged to the Muslim Brotherhood. I visited the Rabaa Al-Adawiya sit-in the night before security forces besieged it. READ MORE
NASRALLAH’S “BRING IT ON!” MOMENT
Nabeel Khoury
The Secretary General of Hezbollah's speeches are always purposeful and addressed to specific audiences. On this occasion, he wanted to buck up his Shia supporters and warn Arab states and his internal Lebanese adversaries not to be encouraged by any Western initiatives to think they could defeat his party. READ MORE
KNOWLEDGE TRIUMPHS OVER THE KNUCKLEHEADS
Rami G. Khouri
The scholarship and serious popular literature on the Arab region in much of the Western world has improved vastly in the past few years, for the simple reason that authors have been forced to write about the realities of what ordinary Arab men and women have put on the global agenda. READ MORE
CONSTITUTIONALLY IMBALANCED
Maâti Monjib
Constitutional reform in Morocco appeared to give more power to the elected government and parliament. However, the palace has maintained a free hand to interpret the constitution and to keep the balance of power in the country in its favor. READ MORE
EGYPT MUST AVOID A ‘SPIRAL OF SILENCE’
Magued Osman
The mistake we appear to have fallen into—in the wake of Brotherhood rule—is the search for an enemy to whom we can assign all blame for previous mistakes thereby justifying otherwise unjustifiable exceptional procedures. Such a situation will lead to mistakes being committed that are just as grievous as those perpetrated by the Muslim Brotherhood. READ MORE
AL-QAEDA'S CRIMINALS AND THE REST OF US
Rami G. Khouri
What should we conclude about the dramatic American reaction to alleged Al-Qaeda threats in the past week? And is there a better way to analyze and respond to the threats that Al-Qaeda does represent?READ MORE
TUNISIA AND ‘THE EGYPTIAN MODEL’
Fadil Aliriza
Ever since the abrupt end of Muslim Brotherhood rule in Egypt, there has been endless speculation about whether the Islamists governing Tunisia would suffer the same fate. An examination of how the similarities and differences are emphasized by the various parties. READ MORE
PUBLIC ATTITUDES ON THE EVE OF MORSI’S FALL
Magued Osman
The degree of uncertainty that prevailed in Egypt’s political scene during the last ten days of June has certainly been unprecedented. The expectations of the political elite, both those occupying the seats of power and those standing on the front lines of the opposition, are wildly divergent. Everyone misread the popular reaction.READ MORE
THE WASHINGTON JERKOCRACY STRIKES AGAIN
Rami G. Khouri
I would love to know who the jerk is who wrote the White House’s press statement on the occasion of the inauguration earlier this week of the new Iranian President, Hassan Rowhani. I say this is the work of a jerk, or a band of war-addicted zealots in Washington, DC, because it seems designed to totally bury the opportunity that Rowhani represents to improve the wellbeing of Iranians and resolve Western-Iranian and Arab-Iranian tensions on a variety of important issues.READ MORE
ENNAHDA AND THE CHALLENGE OF POWER
Rory McCarthy
Tunisia’s Islamist movement Ennahda is facing its most serious crisis since coming to power. At the same time the threat of Salafi radicalism is deepening in a country long presumed to be an oasis of secularism in the Arab world.READ MORE
U.S. OPTIONS IN SYRIA, SCRUTINIZED
Nabeel Khoury
For action to be taken on Syria, it is not the options or the feasibility that are lacking; it’s the political will and the realization that action not taken now is simply an action deferred. As the problem grows, the U.S. will find itself compelled to act.READ MORE
A FALLING-OUT AMONG BROTHERS?
Raphaël Lefèvre
Whether in the street or in parliament, Islamist parties and movements have relied on one key strength for their successes in the immediate post-Arab Spring period—their cohesion and unity. But this could be endangered in the wake of Mohamed Morsi's ouster from the Egyptian presidency. READ MORE
WHAT DO WE LEARN FROM 45 YEARS OF NEGOTIATIONS?
Rami G. Khouri
Watching Monday night’s resumption of Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations in Washington, D.C., I thought back to the last 45 years during which I have closely following Arab-Israeli peace negotiations, and have personally known many of the main negotiators and aides on all sides. So here is what I suggest we keep in mind as this process resumes.READ MORE
JORDAN AND THE WIDER ARAB DILEMMA
Rami G. Khouri
Jordan reflects the dilemma that many Arab governments and countries have experienced for years—the economy continues to grow at a reasonable pace of around three percent, as do improvements to infrastructure and basic services, but daily economic pressures on citizens also persist, or worsen in some cases, leading to chronic frustrations that take on a political character. READ MORE
TIMELINE: IRAN'S NUCLEAR PROGRAM
Cairo Review
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WHAT WILL BECOME OF EGYPT?
Sada Debates
Following mass protests, Egypt’s military intervened on July 3 to remove President Mohamed Morsi from office, marking a dramatic turn in the country’s post-Mubarak transition. Four Egypt experts and Sada contributors weigh in on Egypt’s current predicament. READ MORE
TEXTS: THE UNITED STATES AND IRAN
Cairo Review
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THE DISPENSABLE NATION: AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY IN RETREAT
Jennifer Rowland
Jennifer Rowland parses the tale of a State Department insider. READ MORE
THE WAY OF THE KNIFE: THE CIA, A SECRET ARMY, AND A WAR AT THE ENDS OF THE EARTH
Joshua Hersh
Joshua Hersh investigates America’s shadow war. READ MORE
STUMBLING TO TEHRAN
Danny Postel
Danny Postel follows the Leveretts to Tehran. READ MORE
ROAD TO NOWHERE
John Limbert
Three decades of American hostility to Iran has resulted in a “satisfying purity of indignation” but little more. It is time for presidential leadership, starting with small and symbolic gestures, to prevent an armed conflict that will cause irreparable damage to both sides. READ MORE
HOUSE OF INJUSTICE
Abdulkarim Soroush
Reflecting on democracy, the Iranian philosopher argues: “In a tyrannical system, the first organ that stops functioning is the judicial heart, and that when our heart is so feeble, having a strong and robust body is little more than a naïve and ridiculous dream.” READ MORE
NUCLEAR NARRATIVES
Jonas Siegel, Saranaz Barforoush
Western media coverage emphasizes how Iran is a threat to global security but rarely explores the more complex contours of the dispute. Are journalists once again fueling a dangerous showdown in the Middle East? READ MORE
PIPELINE POLITICS
Reza Sanati
The deal for Iran to provide natural gas to Pakistan and India promised to bolster peace and prosperity in a volatile region. Instead, it became engulfed in a geopolitical struggle. READ MORE
THE LEADER
Nazila Fathi
Iran’s colorful presidents rivet the world’s attention, but the real power in the Islamic Republic rests with a politician-cleric who is hardly known outside the country: Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. His story explains today’s Iran. READ MORE
ROWHANI'S CHALLENGE
Nader Hashemi
Hassan Rowhani scored an impressive victory in Iran’s presidential election in June with the help of reformists, but can he alter the political trajectory of the country? The odds are not favorable. READ MORE
POWER OF ONE
Nazila Fathi
In 2003, Shirin Ebadi became the first Iranian and first Muslim woman to be awarded a Nobel Peace Prize. She has championed human rights in Iran for three decades, and was a founder of Iran’s women’s movement. Since the anti-freedom crackdown in 2009, she has traveled the globe to press the case for justice in the Islamic Republic. She speaks with journalist Nazila Fathi on Iran’s new president and the prospects for democracy in Iran. READ MORE
EGYPT’S PREDICAMENT
Nabil Fahmy
Two and a half years after the fall of President Hosni Mubarak, a year after the election of his successor, Mohammed Morsi, and after Morsi’s sudden ouster and the appointment of an interim president, Mansour Al-Adly, head of Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court, in July, the country is still searching for its identity. READ MORE
AN AMERICAN IN TEHRAN
Holly Dagres
As I was turning thirteen, I packed up everything I had to embark on a new life in Tehran with my Iranian mother and stepfather. In 1999, I left behind everyone and everything I knew in Los Angeles, including my American father. READ MORE
SPARE US THE INTELLECTUAL DISNEYLANDS
Rami G. Khouri
Egypt continues to mesmerize, and, it seems, for many people around the world, to mystify, as well, at least to judge by the many wild and definitive assertions we hear every day about the consequences of developments in Egypt.READ MORE
FIVE OPTIONS FOR IRAN’S NEW PRESIDENT
Seyed Hossein Mousavian
With President Obama calling for a diplomatic solution, and the election of Hassan Rowhani as Iran’s chief executive, a fresh approach to nuclear negotiations is possible. But if diplomacy fails, there’s an Iranian case for withdrawing from the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. READ MORE
IT IS 1789 IN EGYPT
Rami G. Khouri
I support enthusiastically the will of the Egyptian people, because in my book any citizenry that once worshipped cats and more recently removed two autocratic military and theocratic-thugocratic regimes is a citizenry defined by wisdom and sensibility. But we still do not know really what is the will of the Egyptian people, who are deeply divided, and lack the institutions of governance that would allow for an orderly affirmation of majority and minority views.READ MORE
THE ISLAMIC STATE IN CONTEXT
Tarek Osman
Over the past 1,352 years, since the death of Imam Ali (Prophet Mohammed’s cousin and the fourth “Rightly Guided Caliph”), not a single state that emerged in the Arab World has been Islamic. READ MORE
POPULAR LEGITIMACY ASSERTS ITSELF IN EGYPT
Rami G. Khouri
The dramatic developments in Egypt since June 30 will continue to unfold at a brisk pace and many outcomes are possible, but we can draw four main lessons from the events to date, related to the Muslim Brotherhood, the opposition, the armed forces, and the citizenry as a whole and its determination to complete the democratic transition that started in January 2011. READ MORE
MAKE YOUR CITIZENS HAPPY!
Laila El Baradei
Egyptians toppled the Hosni Mubarak regime in 2011 despite a solid economic growth rate. The lesson: politicians and policymakers must give due attention to the real needs and the expectations of vast numbers in the marginalized segments of the population. READ MORE
HISTORIC STREET POLITICS IN EGYPT, TURKEY AND BRAZIL
Rami G. Khouri
The fascinating simultaneous demonstrations and challenges to democratically elected regimes in Egypt, Turkey and Brazil this month suggest that we need to look for an explanation for something structural in newly democratized societies, rather than seeking cultural explanations. READ MORE
ARABS CAN WALK AND CHEW GUM
Rami G. Khouri
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EGYPTIANS ASSESS THEIR FUTURE
James Zogby
Two and a half years after demonstrations erupted in Tahrir Square leading to the downfall of the Mubarak government and one year into the presidency of Mohamed Morsi, we polled 5,029 Egyptians nationwide to assess: the public’s mood; their confidence in the country’s institutions; their satisfaction with the performance of the Morsi government; and their hopes for the future.READ MORE
ON RELIGION, POLITICS, AND DEMOCRATIC LEGITIMACY IN EGYPT
Amr Hamzawy
Since the 2011 January revolution that toppled Egypt’s former regime, the relationship between religion and politics has dominated debates in Egyptian society. The subsequent transitional phase inaugurated a difficult journey toward democracy, rule of law, a citizenship-based state, and power devolution. READ MORE
APOCALYPTIC WORDS FROM MEN IN HIDING
Rami G. Khouri
Former Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri’s broadside of sharp accusations against Hezbollah a few days ago is symptomatic of the entire Lebanese political scene and system—spirited, adversarial, apocalyptic, mostly accurate in its accusations, dire in its predictions, but probably insignificant in its practical, immediate consequences.​READ MORE
INSIGHTS INTO ARAB YOUTH TODAY
Rami G. Khouri
When I visited Cairo this week for the first time in nearly a year, the changed mood among young and old alike hit me in the face like the hot and dusty wind coming off the Egyptian desert. READ MORE
THREE HUNDRED DAYS OF PRESIDENT MORSI
Magued Osman
During Morsi’s first hundred days in office, Baseera conducted three opinion polls on presidential job approval ratings, in which Morsi enjoyed high approval. Seventy-eight percent of respondents approve of his performance, while only 15 percent disapprove. Seven percent weren’t sure. But since then, his ratings have dropped significantly.READ MORE
JORDAN AND TURKEY MIRROR THE CITIZEN-STATE CHALLENGE
Rami G. Khouri
The link between citizen and state is still being negotiated in almost every country in the region, even in those countries like Jordan and Turkey that have enjoyed relatively stability and improved living conditions for nearly a century or so.READ MORE
FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION: THE SECOND ARAB BATTLE
Rami G. Khouri
Recent history suggests that states that try to restrict their citizens’ ability to speak their mind peacefully and constructively are fighting a losing battle. READ MORE
OF IDENTITIES AND INSTITUTIONS
Ibrahim Hatlani
The Saudi version of religion has proven to be an effective weapon for the monarchy to rely upon in facing political and security crises, and the rulers have become highly adept at using religion and state clerics to expand their own influence. However recently, Salafi clerics have begun to fear a change to this long held agreement. READ MORE
THE NEW AND THE ORDINARY IN THE MIDDLE EAST
Rami G. Khouri
Every once in a while the Middle East region experiences a series of major and simultaneous developments in several different arenas, indicating that something important is taking place. We are passing through just such a moment this week.READ MORE
SALAFISTS ON THE MOVE
Rami G. Khouri
The sudden escalation of fighting in the north Lebanese city of Tripoli is troubling on two fronts and noteworthy on a third. The troubling dimensions are the chronic nature of urban warfare on Lebanon’s streets and the direct linkages between the Tripoli battles and the fighting in Qusayr, Syria. The noteworthy element is the growing role of Salafists.READ MORE
SALAFISM’S MARCH THROUGH NORTH AFRICA
Tarek Osman
“This is not the Tunisia we know,” the head of a respected Tunisian think tank told me as thousands of Salafists marched through the heart of Tunis’s old Medina, steps from one of its most exclusive restaurants, one that serves premium French wine under the watchful eye of a stern sommelier. READ MORE
CHINA ADDRESSES THE MIDDLE EAST
Rami G. Khouri
I would rather have the Chinese and Russians involved in seeking some kind of breakthrough in peace-making than merely sitting on the side and leaving the arena to the hapless Americans who have proven over the past 45 years that they enjoy neither the political impartiality nor the law-based constructive rigor needed to be a successful mediator in this conflict. READ MORE
THE BATTLE OVER EGYPT’S JUDICIARY
Nathan Brown
Egypt’s elected Islamists have locked horns in a struggle with the judiciary that veers between full confrontation and guarded accommodation. READ MORE
AMERICA AND A CHANGING MIDDLE EAST
William J. Burns
I’ve learned a few things about the Middle East during my own checkered thirty-one year career in the Foreign Service. It seems to me that a workable, long-term American strategy has three inter-connected elements: support for democratic change, economic opportunity, and regional peace and security. READ MORE
NEW SPOTLIGHT ON EGYPTIAN JEWS
Maha El-Kady
The ordeal of the film "Jews of Egypt" has raised many concerns about freedom of expression in Egypt and also revived a debate about the rights of Egyptian Jews. READ MORE
FREE FLOW OF INFORMATION
Magued Osman
The issue of free flow of information must not be seen as an intellectual luxury in a time of growing challenges facing Egypt. Rather, the issue should be tackled as a component of a package of new orientations for building a modern state.READ MORE
DROP THE FAILED APPROACHES AND TRY NEW IDEAS
Rami G. Khouri
Much as I support any opportunity to restart Palestinian-Israeli peace negotiations, I doubt that we will make any progress on this front if we stick to the approach that has repeatedly failed and now seems to be replaying itself. READ MORE
ARAB TRANSITIONS ARE SLOW FOR GOOD REASONS
Rami G. Khouri
As various countries across the Arab world navigate difficult transitions from former dictatorships to new forms of governance, much remains unclear in terms of exactly how much citizen participation and government accountability will prevail. READ MORE
TIMELINE: PALESTINE REFUGEES
Cairo Review
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OUT OF EGYPT
Tarek Osman
Egypt’s 2011 uprising has triggered an emigration wave, which could have perilous social and economic outcomes. READ MORE
THE SCRAMBLE FOR CITIZENS: DUAL NATIONALITY AND STATE COMPETITION FOR IMMIGRANTS
Kelsey Norman
Kelsey Norman deconstructs the story of dual citizens. READ MORE
IRANIANS IN AMERICA
Chris Ulack
They fled a revolution in the Middle East, to experience discriminatory policies and stereotyping in the WestREAD MORE
OUR VIETNAMESE HEARTS
Andrew Lam
Those who fled the Fall of Saigon in 1975 were refugees traumatized by wars and bound by old ways of life. In the United States, they built new lives in a country known for its fabulous fantasies, high-tech wizardry, and individualistic ambition. For many, the homeland is a destination, but no longer their destiny. READ MORE
KUWAIT'S HISTORIC CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE
Rami G. Khouri
I am mesmerized by the continuing political developments in Kuwait—and to a lesser extent in other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries—where thousands of citizens of a wealthy, paternalistic and generous Gulf oil-producing country continue to protest against the government on a variety of issues anchored in rights, rather than material needs.READ MORE
NOSTALGIA AND NAIVETE—WATCHING ARGO AS AN IRANIAN AMERICAN
Holly Dagres
My reaction to last year’s blockbuster hit, and now multiple Oscar-winner, Argo was probably different than most people. Watching those Americans trapped in Tehran, bizarrely enough, evoked memories of my adolescence.​READ MORE
CONGO STORIES
Sarah Kenyon Lischer
Conflict and population displacement in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is portrayed as impossibly complex. There are four competing accounts, depending on which side is telling the story. Interpretation of history will always be contested. A more inclusive narrative can clear the way to constructive solutions. READ MORE
GUESTS AND HOSTS
Dawn Chatty
Iraqis have confounded Western expectations of refugee behavior. They did not leave their country en masse during the U.S.-led invasion in 2003. Later when they fled sectarian violence, they refused to huddle in refugee camps. Arab traditions underpin a humane approach to asylum policy in the Middle East. READ MORE
THE SINAI CONNECTION
Lina Attalah
Thousands of African migrants have fallen prey to human traffickers in Egypt. Their tragic stories unfold a tale of a desert border region's isolation and neglect, and a resulting descent into lawlessness. READ MORE
ENGAGING THE HAITIAN DIASPORA
Tatiana Wah
Some 70 percent of Haiti's skilled workers live outside the country. Tapping this important resource for economic development requires a better understanding of why they left and how they can effectively contribute to their homeland. READ MORE
THE NEVER-ENDING PALESTINE TRAGEDY
Karen Koning AbuZayd
Despite the grim obstacles and prospects, Palestine refugees refuse to give up. Giving them justice is essential for Middle East peace. READ MORE
“TO LIVE, NOT TO DIE”
Sheera Frenkel
Ali Hamouda is pumping gas in northern Jordan. Yasmin Khaled is sipping green tea chai at a trendy Amman café. Salma Farouk is languishing in a refugee camp in Turkey. Here are stories of the Syrian refugees. READ MORE
STRUGGLE OF THE MIDDLE EAST REFUGEES
António Guterres
The displacement of millions of Syrians is merely the latest such crisis in the region. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees argues that the world must provide political solutions, not only humanitarian aid. READ MORE
LAND OF IMMIGRATION
Mark J. Miller
READ MORE
ORIENTAL HALL, ETC.
Nadeen Shaker
READ MORE
DIARY OF A BDS ACTIVIST
Aaron T. Rose
READ MORE
REFUGEES AND RESEARCHERS
Maha El-Kady
READ MORE
SOLACE AT THE STATE’S EXPENSE
Magued Osman
Even if Egypt were a very rich country—the richest country in the world—is it morally permissible that condolences published in newspapers by officials are financed from the money paid by taxpayers? READ MORE
AMERICA'S NEW FACE
Cairo Review
San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro is a leading voice for the humane treatment of undocumented migrants in the debate over U.S. immigration reform. He speaks with Cairo Review Managing Editor Scott MacLeod on being the grandson of a Mexican immigrant, why illegal aliens should be offered a path to citizenship, and how the rising clout of Hispanic voters forced Republicans to "change their tune" on the issue. READ MORE
PAINFULLY FOLLOWING IRAN IN THE U.S. MEDIA
Rami G. Khouri
One of the most annoying aspects of spending time in the United States, is to follow the news coverage of Iran in the mainstream American media. Well, calling it “news” coverage is a bit of a stretch, because the mainstream American media is not really reporting news about Iran, but rather repackaged ideological attacks and threats that emanate primarily from the American and Israeli governments.​READ MORE
UNITING FOR TUNISIA?
Monica Marks, Omar Belhaj Salah
Recent polls place Nidaa Tounes—a self-proclaimed “modernist” party founded in the summer of 2012—nearly neck and neck with Ennahda, Tunisia’s ruling Islamist party.READ MORE
THE DAWN OF DEMOCRACY
Hüseyin Avni Botsali
Egyptian people and political forces are in need of hammering-out a new national covenant. A social contract that will unite all segments of the society, empower the people, give them the long needed safeguards for freedom, dignity, justice, and ultimately, the motivation to build a prosperous future by reviving the economy through accountable, transparent governance. READ MORE
AMERICA AND THE MIDDLE EAST – II
Rami G. Khouri
A foreign power like the United States cannot devise a new policy on, say, Iran, Arab democratization, or terrorism, without also reassessing its stance on other key issues like Israeli colonization, or using drones as assassination machines.READ MORE
PLAGUED BY INSECURITIES
Monica Marks
While fragmentation of state power has increased freedom of political and religious expression in Tunisia, it has also generated a certain amount of instability and criminality which reflect the state’s weakness and inability to implement the rule of law. READ MORE
AMERICA AND THE MIDDLE EAST – I
Rami G. Khouri
It is also worth viewing Obama’s trip to the Middle East from the perspective of the Middle East itself, where perceptions of the United States and its actions in the region are very mixed, and largely negative.READ MORE
JUDGE ISLAMISTS BY PERFORMANCE, NOT PIETY
Rami G. Khouri
Are Islamist groups gaining or losing popularity in different Arab countries? Are Islamists of all varieties better at governing with a legitimate electoral mandate, or better at being opposition groups that only serve their narrow constituencies with a variety of social services and organized piety? READ MORE
HUGO CHÁVEZ & THE MIDDLE EAST: WHICH SIDE WAS HE ON?
Danny Postel
There’s a less discussed dimension of the Chávez legacy to examine: his relations with the countries of the Middle East and North Africa, a story whose significance became more salient with the onset of the momentous changes the region has been undergoing over the last few years. READ MORE
UPGRADING URBAN EGYPT
Mohamed Elshahed
The state has turned a blind eye and because of the lack of accountability and the current political uncertainty no long or short term solutions to such fundamental infrastructural problems have been initiated. READ MORE
THE DIPLOMATIC SERIAL FAILURES
Rami G. Khouri
Understandably, Middle East circles these days increasingly speculate about whether President Obama will explore opportunities for re-launching peace negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians. Less understandable is why a leading American publication should turn for advice on this issue from former diplomat Dennis Ross. READ MORE
U.S. POLICY ON SYRIA IS NAÏVE AND COUNTER-PRODUCTIVE
Rami G. Khouri
At the start of my current trip in the United States, the single question that dominates Mideast-watchers here in the New World is what to do about Syria, and whether or not the United States should provide military assistance to the opposition groups fighting to topple the regime of President Bashar Assad. READ MORE
THE ROYALS’ NEW RULES: BACKSLIDING IN BAHRAIN
Amy Austin Holmes
The Al Khalifas of Bahrain, the Sunni family which has lorded over the Shia-majority population since 1783, has a long history of thwarting revolutionary uprisings. They’ve recently added five new tactics to their repertoire. READ MORE
EGYPT’S OPPOSITION NEEDS UNITY—AND LEADERSHIP
Seifeldin Fawzy
Where is the Giuseppe Garibaldi, Simón Bolívar, or Mustapha Kamel of the January 25 Revolution? The lack of an outright leader has badly harmed the opposition movement’s ability to impact politics. READ MORE
ARABS SEEK CITIZENSHIP AND STATEHOOD
Rami G. Khouri
Beneath the surface reality of turbulence that occasionally reaches violence or stalemate is a much more complex, time-consuming and hopeful trend.READ MORE
THE REFUGEE FACTOR
Kai Kverme
The waves of Syrian refugees seeking a safe haven have further exacerbated the division among the Christian parties in Lebanon.READ MORE
TIMELINE: CHINA SINCE 1898
Cairo Review
READ MORE
RESTLESS EMPIRE: CHINA AND THE WORLD SINCE 1750
Ira Hubert
Ira Hubert studies the meaning of Chinese history since 1750. READ MORE
THE EXTRAORDINARY FALL OF BO XILAI
Anne Henochowicz
Anne Henochowicz investigates a murder in Chongqing READ MORE
TOWARD A NEW AMERICAN POLICY
Daniel C. Kurtzer
The United States should develop a new, comprehensive policy and a sustained strategy for advancing the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. Amid growing skepticism about and opposition to Washington’s policy in the Middle East, a serious effort can have a transformative effect on U.S. standing and credibility. READ MORE
TIBET’S VOICE OF REALISM
Pico Iyer
The 14th Dalai Lama may be a Buddhist spiritual figure, but pragmatism is all that truly matters for him. He is a doctor of the mind, determined to locate the source of suffering and come up with a practical cure. As the author observed while traveling with him in Japan, it is a message that resonates far beyond Tibet and China. READ MORE
LIVE, FROM BEIJING!
Ying Zhu
Gone are the days when China Central Television broadcast nothing but party propaganda. It is a modern media empire, operationally autonomous and fending off competition from a rising number of rival domestic channels. Now, like Qatar’s Al Jazeera, it is taking on the world. CCTV is a channel to watch. READ MORE
RULE OF THE PRINCELINGS
Cheng Li
Xi Jinping received a strong mandate to govern during the 18th Party Congress of the Communist Party of China in November. Accelerating economic reform is clearly on his agenda. But how far will he move the country from authoritarianism to democracy? READ MORE
WAITING FOR THE NEXT ACT
Dorinda Elliott
Orville Schell, the Arthur Ross Director of the Center on U.S.-China Relations at the Asia Society in New York, has been studying and writing about China for more than fifty years. He speaks with Dorinda Elliott about the recent leadership transition, prospects for constitutionalism, dangers of nationalism, need for greater Washington-Beijing cooperation, and this next phase of Chinese history. READ MORE
ORIENTAL HALL, ETC.
Stephen Kalin, Fritz Lodge
READ MORE
THE MISSION OF MIDDLE EAST STUDIES
Owain Lawson
READ MORE
REMAKING ARAB CIVIL SOCIETY
Rami G. Khouri
One of the profound developments now taking place in the ongoing Arab uprisings and transformations is the breakdown of the neat categories we have long used to understand and analyze political life. It's time to rethink terms like “civil society."READ MORE
THE RISE OF SYRIA'S KURDS
Heiko Wimmen , Müzehher Selcuk
Since the summer of 2012, the beleaguered Syrian regime has all but abandoned areas predominantly inhabited by Kurdish populations. Meanwhile, the Democratic Union Party, a Syrian Kurdish group, is gaining ground politically and militarily.READ MORE
THE GANGLAND POLICIES OF CERTAIN 'EXCEPTIONAL' NATIONS
Rami G. Khouri
For anyone who wonders why so many people around the world criticize American and Israeli foreign policy and militarism, this has been a valuable learning week. I refer to the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearings on Chuck Hagel’s nomination to be the next U.S. Secretary of Defense, and the twin Israeli attacks against military targets in Syria.READ MORE
UNHAPPY ARABIA
Ibrahim Hatlani
Activists are increasingly speaking out on topics of reform and rights in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, each with their own interpretation of the necessary course.READ MORE
MUBARAK’S RETRIAL AND ERROR
Tarek Osman
The decision by a court this week to overturn President Mubarak’s—and former Interior Minister Habib El-Adly’s—life sentences and retry them will stir up new confrontations. Mubarak’s fate will be the finale of the dramatic story of the first Egyptian Republic.READ MORE
TWO YEARS ON: TUNISIA’S SOCIAL PACT
Rami G. Khouri
The populist-driven revolution in Tunisia has opened political space for everyone in the country to compete for a share in power and governance, and to reach consensus on the new constitution and other historic changes.READ MORE
ALL UNIONIZED AND NOWHERE TO GO
Joel Beinin
Almost a thousand new unions independent of ETUF have been established since the January 25, 2011 uprising. But workers have not been a strong factor in the post-Mubarak national political arena.READ MORE
JORDAN AT A CROSSROADS
Rami G. Khouri
I am convinced that if you want to visit only one country to gain insights into the many forces that are shaping our region, Jordan is the country to visit. READ MORE
ARAB WORLD LESSONS FROM 2012
Rami G. Khouri
The year 2012 will be remembered as an important milestone in the development of the modern Arab World, because it has started to reveal the underlying but long-hidden strengths and weaknesses of Arab societies and states.READ MORE
AFTER BATTLES COME SYRIA'S ECONOMIC CHOICES
Omar Dahi
The political opposition has estimated rebuilding costs at about $60 billion, but they have yet to specify exactly how and where the money will be spent. READ MORE
CRITICAL LESSONS FROM EGYPT'S CONSTITUTIONAL REFERENDUM
Rami G. Khouri
The first round of the constitutional referendum last week was a perfect microcosm of everything Egyptian -- it was majestic in scale, profound in meaning and consequence, erratic and messy in implementation, unpredictable in outcome, and entertaining in every respect. READ MORE
WHY HAMAS
Wasseem El-Sarraj
After the war, over dinner, I’d used the word hurriya (freedom)—but before I could finish a girl working at one of the large international NGO’s interrupted me: “Don’t say that: you will remind us we are under occupation.” It’s a stunning statement that reveals the delicate balance in Gaza.READ MORE
THE SECOND ANNIVERSARY OF THE ARAB UPRISINGS
Rami G. Khouri
In the next few days we will mark the second anniversary of the start of the Arab uprisings, when Mohammad Bouazizi set himself on fire in Tunisia on December 17, 2010. The balance sheet of change in the Arab world over these two years has been epic and historic, but often turbulent and even chaotic, as citizens continue to shape new governance systems that respect rather than demean them.READ MORE
EGYPT SUPPRESSES WORKERS’ VOICES
Erin Radford
On the heels of the hotly contested decree granting the Egyptian president unlimited authority, President Morsi also amended the nation’s 1976 trade union law, further raising concerns for Egypt’s democratic transition.READ MORE
MORSI’S CONSTITUTIONAL REFERENDUM: THE STATE OF PLAY
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
On December 1, President Morsi issued executive order no. 397/2012, calling for a referendum on the new constitution’s final draft, which had been passed by the Constituent Assembly only the day before. A primer on the referendum slated for December 15.READ MORE
AMATEURS TAKE OVER IN EGYPT
Rami G. Khouri
Unlike Nelson Mandela who spent decades in jail and then showed his compassion, flexibility and statesmanship when he became the president of South Africa, Morsi is unable at this stage to act as the magnanimous leader of all Egyptians.READ MORE
THE ALLURE OF GUNS AND LAWS
Rami G. Khouri
Armed revolution, international legality, or home-grown constitutionalism? These three options for national change are simultaneously being used this week in the three Arab countries that arguably have had the most impact on the Middle East region in the last century—Syria, Egypt and Palestine. READ MORE
EGYPT'S FIVE BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT
Rami G. Khouri
The dramatic events in Egypt over the past few days following President Mohammad Morsi’s unilateral decree giving him unchallenged political authority should not surprise or frighten anyone. In fact, the continuing developments can be seen as a positive stage in the country’s historic political transition from autocracy to democracy. READ MORE
THE STATE OF KUWAIT
Mariwan Hama
On November 5, Kuwait’s emir, Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad Al Sabah, confirmed that he would go ahead with the changes he made in the Kuwait’s electoral law this past October 19. This amendment to the electoral law ahead of the December 1 parliamentary elections is likely to escalate the political crisis in Kuwait.READ MORE
GAZA'S FRAGILE UNITY
Jared Malsin
The 2011 uprisings placed Hamas in the awkward position of attempting to align itself with a wave of popular revolts while simultaneously clamping down on protests in Gaza. But despite the domestic crackdown, Hamas managed to emerge from 2011 in a stronger regional position.READ MORE
NEW ORLEANS, MARCHING ON
Anne Gisleson
From Katrina to Isaac, hurricanes have brought death and destruction. Two years ago came another calamity: the BP Deepwater Horizon Disaster. Adding insult to injury, citizens no longer have a daily newspaper to inform on their troubles. The story of how a great American city wrangles the void.READ MORE
STILL MIGHTIER THAN THE SWORD

Jonathan Guyer
The demise of the American newspaper seemed to be the death knell for an All-American tradition: the editorial cartoon. But a spirited new generation of cartoonists is taking its irreverence online. Rest assured: the Republic remains in safe hands!READ MORE
A DEEP, DEEP SLEEP
Tom Kutsch
In the film The Dark Knight Rises, Batman once again saves Gotham City from ruin but at the ostensible cost of the superhero’s own life. It is a parable that explores fear and anxiety in the Age of Terror and forces Americans to confront truths about the violence in their land. READ MORE
ISLAMOPHOBES
Moustafa Bayoumi
For much of the U.S., the September 11 attacks transformed Muslim Americans from an invisible minority to a shadowy people to be feared. During the Obama presidency, civil rights conditions for the community have gone from bad to worse. The popular climate has become uglier. Something has changed in America.READ MORE
LOST IN THE MIDDLE EAST
Amaney A. Jamal
Washington’s response to the Arab Spring is to bolster secularists as a bulwark against the rise of Islamists. But the policy undermines the struggle for democracy. For a sounder approach, America should develop policies that address the sentiments and grievances of the man on the street.READ MORE
TEXTS: ADDRESSES BY PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA ON THE MIDDLE EAST (2009-2012)
Cairo Review
Compiled by Jonathan Guyer READ MORE
ISLAMOPHOBIA AND THE POLITICS OF EMPIRE
Matthew Duss
Matthew Duss ponders the problem of Orientalism in WashingtonREAD MORE
SYRIA: THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF ASSAD
Lara Setrakian
Lara Setrakian examines the rise and fall of Bashar Al-AssadREAD MORE
AMERICANS ADRIFT: THE CRISIS OF VALUES IN THE LAND OF OPPORTUNITY
Maggie Severns
Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy. By Christopher Hayes. Crown, 2012. 304 pp. READ MORE
REMEMBERING MEDHAT
Nabil Fahmy
I had the good fortune to work with a man of great skill and quality of character who was an exemplary diplomat: Medhat Haroun, American University in Cairo's provost, who passed away on October 18. READ MORE
SAILBOAT DIPLOMACY
Stephen Kalin
The wake from a larger vessel rocked the felucca, a traditional Egyptian sailboat, heaving it against the pontoon it was docked beside. As water entered the hull, the two Americans aboard pictured their mission of personal diplomacy sinking along with their second-hand boat. READ MORE
CHOMSKY IN TAHRIR
Madeline B. Welsh
Two hours beforehand, a crowd was already pressing the gate outside Ewart Hall on the Tahrir Square campus of the American University in Cairo. When American linguist and author Noam Chomsky arrived on stage, the packed audience of twelve hundred rose in a thunderous standing ovation. READ MORE
ORIENTAL HALL, ETC.
Stephen Kalin, Madeline B. Welsh
READ MORE
ELECTIONS, AMERICAN-STYLE
Madeline B. Welsh
Cairo was dark when U.S. Representative Patricia Schroeder stepped off the plane in Egypt. Very dark. It was the beginning of the 1973 Middle East war, Israeli forces had reached Kilometer 101, and the capital was under a blackout. READ MORE
U.S. AID AND EGYPT: IT'S COMPLICATED
Thalia Beaty
In examining U.S. assistance to Egypt, the United States will need to confront some uncomfortable truths about the militarization and inflexibility of American foreign policy in Egypt. READ MORE
STILL FIGHTING THE LAST WAR? EGYPT'S JUDGES AFTER THE REVOLUTION
Nathan Brown
Reformist judges may be finding themselves better equipped to fight with yesteryear’s Mubarak than with this year’s more complicated rivals, and the struggles over the coming years are likely to feature a different set of issues—or perhaps, more accurately, unexpected iterations of the older concerns over autonomy and authority. READ MORE
BAHRAIN: HUMAN RIGHTS AND POLITICAL WRONGS
Toby C. Jones
The Bahraini government is certainly interested in pushing a more progressive image abroad, but the truth at home is that authorities remain committed to pursuing a hardline political agenda that invariably involves sustained suppression of activists. READ MORE
MORSI'S MESSAGE TO AMERICA
Jonathan Guyer
Even as the goodwill won by Obama’s Cairo University speech has dissipated, the level of engagement pursued early in his term suggested a reevaluation of how America does business in the Middle East. Morsi deserves his own chance to win America’s goodwill, and he’ll have that very opportunity at the UN General Assembly.READ MORE
NEW ARAB REALITIES
Rami G. Khouri
We can already identify a series of genuinely historic, new and meaningful developments in many of the Arab states in transformation, after 21 months of the Arab uprisings. READ MORE
FIGHTING CENSORSHIP
Ahmed Aboul Enein
READ MORE
THE NEW LINEUP
Rania Al Malky
Choosing Generals, Brothers, Remnants, or LiberalsREAD MORE
THE FALL OF HOSNI MUBARAK
Tarek Osman
How a Failure to Lead Brought Down the Leader READ MORE
“FREEDOM, FREEDOM, COME, EMBRACE US”
Mona Prince
An Egyptian’s Account of Her RevolutionREAD MORE
TEXTS: EGYPT’S POLITICAL TRANSITION
Maha El-Kady
Texts from the revolutionREAD MORE
A BAHA’I LITMUS TEST FOR EGYPT
Dwight Bashir
Could Egypt’s treatment of its Baha’is predict the future of its January 25 revolution?READ MORE
ORIENTAL HALL, ETC.
Madeline B. Welsh
READ MORE
WITNESS TO AN ELECTION, AND TO HISTORY
Thomas Plofchan
Ayman Mohammed Abdel Sabour is a lawyer from Alexandria and a member of the I Am Egyptian Association for Development and Human Rights. It is a warm spring evening, and we are both official observers for the 2012 Egyptian presidential election. He and I are in the Nile Delta city of Damanhour, standing in the city’s cultural center where votes from polling stations in two of the Behera governorate’s fifteen districts are being aggregated. There are a few journalists here as well, watching a team of senior judges tally the figures under military protection. READ MORE
REVOLUTION 2.0
Wendell Steavenson
Wendell Steavenson searches for Wael GhonimREAD MORE
WHAT TO LEARN—OR NOT—FROM EARLY DRAFTS OF HISTORY
Issandr El Amrani
The Arab Uprising: The Unfinished Revolutions of the New Middle East. By Marc Lynch; The Invisible Arab: The Promise and Peril of the Arab Revolution. By Marwan Bishara; The Arab Awakening: Islam and the New Middle East. By Tariq Ramadan. READ MORE
TIMELINE: EGYPT’S POLITICAL TRANSITION
Cairo Review
Compiled by Ghazala IrshadREAD MORE
THE SECOND EGYPTIAN REPUBLIC
Tarek Osman
The January 25 revolution brought down the first, military-dominated Egyptian republic established after the 1952 officers’ coup. A new era of youth-driven dynamism has begun, pointing to a more open, efficient, and civic political system that should foster vigorous, healthy debate in the governing of the country. READ MORE
BROTHER PRESIDENT
Shadi Hamid
Mohammed Morsi was a pedestrian politician until recently, little known outside the circles of the Muslim Brotherhood. Today, he is the first democratically elected president in Egyptian history. An inside look at Morsi’s rise to power, and what to expect from the first Islamist to lead the Arab’s world’s most populous and important country. READ MORE
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