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September 11, 2015
LAUREN E. BOHN
Lauren E. Bohn is the assistant editor of the Cairo Review and a 2010-2011 Fulbright fellow in Egypt. A multimedia journalist, she graduated summa cum laude from New York University in May 2009 as a John W. Withers Memorial Award recipient and Presidential Scholar. She earned her master’s degree from Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, where she received Chicago’s Association for Women Journalists 2010 award for outstanding young female journalist. Her multimedia work has been published by CNN, TIME, Foreign Policy, The New York Times, Salon, Global Post, Christian Science Monitor, Huffington Post, and Ms. Magazine, among others.
FOREIGN POLICY, INTERRUPTED
To respond to a stark gender disparity in foreign affairs, a new non-profit works to get more women miked, quoted, and bylined. READ MORE
GLOBAL MUSLIMS IN THE POST-OSAMA ERA
Best selling author and Mind/Body pundit Deepak Chopra has deemed him a “Muslim Gandhi” for his calls for a pacifist antidote to the often inaccurate Islamist extremist discourse that emerged post 9/11, and he has been widely sought in the American Media for his American- Muslim perspective. In his new book Islamic Pacifism: Global Muslims in the Post-Osama Era, Arsalan Iftikhar, an international human rights lawyer by trade and founder of themuslimguy.com charts out a new global movement based on peaceful coexistence that is firmly rooted within the framework of modern Islam. Iftikhar talked to the Cairo Review about how the Arab Spring has affected his mission and how Obama is getting it wrong. READ MORE
WILLIAM B. QUANDT ON THE PEACE PROCESS: “AT A DEAD END”
Despite the intense focus on the uprisings across the Middle East, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict continues to command diplomatic attention. Later this month, the United Nations General Assembly is slated to vote on Palestinian statehood. William B. Quandt, author of Peace Process: American Diplomacy and the Arab–Israeli Conflict Since 1967, spoke to the Cairo Review on the outlook for progress. READ MORE
WOMEN AND THE ARAB SPRING
Egyptian women were on the front lines of the protests that brought down President Hosni Mubarak. The Arab Spring has not expressly rallied for the advancement of women’s rights, though many have said that the empowerment they felt during the demonstrations should be used to effect change for women themselves. Now, however, many women are worried they are being sidelined in the formation of a new Egypt as the country's de facto ruling body, the military, charts a framework for transition. Isobel Coleman, senior fellow for U.S. foreign policy at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, talked to the Cairo Review about the days ahead for women in Egypt. READ MORE
A SPECIAL REPORT: INSIDE AL-ASSAD'S SYRIA TODAY
Yazan is one of legions of Syrians who have internalized the paranoia that has been the hallmark of life under the Baath Party regime. The vast network of Syria's security agencies, the feared mukhabarat, has turned Syria into a kingdom of silence. READ MORE
GALAL AMIN: THE PEOPLE VS. THE ARMY
Egyptian author Galal Amin's new book is certainly timely. “Egypt in the Era of Hosni Mubarak, 1981-2011” chronicles the corruption and misrule that led to Egypt’s January 25 revolution. Amin, a professor at the American University in Cairo, spoke to the Cairo Review after his book launch. READ MORE
A UNIVERSITY AND A REVOLUTION
Three young Egyptians talk about their roles in the revolution READ MORE
LISA ANDERSON’S WORLD VIEW
Upon entering the office of the American University in Cairo President Lisa Anderson, you’ll admire the beautiful colored globe prominently displayed on a table. But dozens of globes? There’s a collection of smaller globes on a bookshelf. There are bowls of tiny globes (key chains, actually) on a coffee table. Globes, globes, everywhere. READ MORE
ISLAM AND GENDER
Butler is harsh on the tendency in the West, especially among feminists, to categorically condemn the veil. “Negotiating questions of sexuality and gender is not always done according to the same language you find in the U.S. or in France,” she explains. READ MORE
OLD FUNNY SONG
Vendors in Tahrir Square have been doing a brisk business selling T-shirts of various colorful designs that usually have “January 25” emblazoned on the front. Certainly the first day of the Egyptian revolution, when tens of thousands initially gathered in Cairo’s central square, was a milestone. Now, with the television cameras largely gone and souvenir stands taking over, the revolution might appear to be over. Egyptians know better, perhaps none more than Hossam El-Hamalawy. READ MORE
Arabs Watch as Lebanon Navigates a Crucial Moment
No Exit: The Politics of Garbage in Lebanon
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A WORLD OF FOOD
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