FEBSEPOCT
11
201220152016
74 captures
14 Nov 2011 - 14 Sep 2015
About this capture
September 11, 2015
ERIN BIEL
Erin Biel is a third year at Yale University, where she is double majoring in Global Affairs (with an International Security focus) and Ethnicity, Race & Migration. She is currently spending a semester abroad at the American University in Cairo.  In addition to writing for Yale’s international affairs publication, The Yale Globalist, Biel researches and writes for the Cairo Review and freelances for Egyptian newspapers.

To most around the world who watched the events of the Jan. 25 Revolution in Egypt unfold, the images of Tahrir Square protesters fleeing flanks of riot police, tear gas, and armored tanks served as vivid depictions of the egregious violence experienced directly by those on the ground. However, for those on the ground, other vivid images began to illustrate the Revolution: cartoons. READ MORE
A curious image is displayed on a wall outside the American University in Cairo’s Tahrir Square campus. Inconspicuous at first glance, the red and white chess board is more than a game. The pawns are grouped together at one end, and an upside-down king is flanked by bishops, knights, and castles at the other. An apt metaphor, to many revolutionaries, of how a ruler was toppled yet strongmen remained in power. READ MORE
Carlos Latuff has penned some of the most acerbic political cartoons of the Egyptian revolution. One of them shows a shoe hurtling toward Hosni Mubarak, such use of footwear being one of the gravest personal insults in Arab culture. Another iconic image portrays Egypt’s longtime ruler as a diminutive figure, dangled from his collar by Khalid Said, the young Egyptian whose death in police custody fueled the January 25 uprising. Latuff’s cartoons are ubiquitous in Egypt, adorning everything from blog sites and Tahrir Square t-shirts to the front pages of Cairo dailies. Yet, the cartoonist is not an Egyptian, but slings his ink-tipped arrows from a studio in far away Brazil, his native country. READ MORE
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A WORLD OF FOOD
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